PowerPC in Space

Discussion in 'PowerPC Macs' started by Ih8reno, Dec 8, 2014.

  1. repentix macrumors regular

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    May 26, 2013
    #3
    It's nice to hear that PowerPC''s are seen as reliable enough for important missions like that one.
     
  2. PowerMac G4 MDD macrumors 68000

    PowerMac G4 MDD

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    #4
    Wow, that made the rest of my day! Did you all know that the Xbox 360 has a PowerPC processor? So does the Wii. As for the Wii U, it has some branched-off evolution of PPC processor, but it still counts.
     
  3. bunnspecial macrumors 603

    bunnspecial

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  4. jbarley macrumors 68030

    jbarley

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  5. velocityg4 macrumors 68040

    velocityg4

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    #8
    I wonder if it's because they started planning for this back in 2004. As I understand it NASA sticks with whatever computer tech is available when planning begins. Due to the amount of testing, debugging, reinforcing, &c which needs to be done. It would wreak havoc in planning if something changed.

    Although faster G4 chips were available. Perhaps they weren't seen as reliable or were too power hungry.
     
  6. jbarley macrumors 68030

    jbarley

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    #9
    This exactly the explanation I got in regards to the Mars Rover.
    Both for the hardware and software.
     
  7. PowerMac G4 MDD macrumors 68000

    PowerMac G4 MDD

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    #10
    They don't need super fast processors to run these things, and I guess they wanted something robust. It said they also enhanced the components so they would be more resilient to shock and such.
     
  8. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

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    #11
    The Hubble Space Telescope when launched didn't have any onboard CPU. It was upgraded on one of the first few service missions to contain a radiation hardened Intell 486 so that is could process images taken. It's still up there, orbiting around and computing data at lovely 1990's pace.
     
  9. orestes1984 macrumors 65816

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    Australia
    #12
    A lot of NASA's hardware is early 486 vintage, simply because it works and it processes what it needs to do. These systems don't have high overheads and are often very task specific so they don't need extra overheads for the nuances of pretty graphics or games of solitaire they just need to work.

    There are some older missile silos and such littered across the American countryside that are running off even older technology like teletype terminals and such with the most expandability being a 5.25" magnetic disk.

    They are task specific, mission critical machines, they're not a computer as you or I know it.
     
  10. cocacolakid macrumors 65816

    cocacolakid

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    #13
    OP, I meant to post the other day how much I enjoyed that article. Thank you.
     
  11. Ih8reno thread starter macrumors 65816

    Ih8reno

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    Aug 10, 2012
    #14
    My pleasure
     

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