Problem podcasting with Blue Snowball

Discussion in 'Digital Audio' started by cdmcmahon, Aug 22, 2010.

  1. cdmcmahon macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2010
    #1
    So I recently began to record a podcast with a friend and we use a Plantronics .Audio 655 headset and Blue Snowball microphone for my and his voice, respectively. He uses the Blue Snowball microphone on its 1st setting (a cardiod directional recording pattern).

    However, even as such, the microphone picks my voice up from time to time, such that I get an echo on the track that sounds bad and has to be manually deleted afterward.

    Sometimes a sound gate can get this and remove it, but not always.

    My question is whether there is something I can do with software to alleviate the problem (I am currently using Garageband, but I am interested in upgrading to middle-of-the-road software), or it is solely a hardware thing.

    Our set up consistes of us sitting in a room about 3 to 4 feet apart.
     
  2. Aniday macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2009
    #2
    Because you're sitting 3 feet apart.


    Play with recording volume settings and how close you talk in the mic. Chances are the mic is just too sensitive for how far you are away apart. And maybe direct your voice away from his mic.
     
  3. cdmcmahon thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2010
    #3
    I know it's because we're that close, and I guess I was wondering if there's anyway within the realm of software to modify that, but I'm guessing that's not the case : - (.
     
  4. Aniday macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2009
    #4
    All the software to fix it is already in Garageband. Like I said, play with recording volumes and the simple noise reducer plug ins. The Voice Enhancer is a nice way to get rid of quiet noises in the background. Stuff like that.
     
  5. cdmcmahon thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2010
    #5
    Thanks for the help.
     
  6. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2002
    Location:
    toronto
    #6
    it all starts with mic placement. Anything after that is a band-aid.
     
  7. tranzmute macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2010
    Location:
    Crewe
    #7
    I wish I could add some epic solution to this problem but zimv20 said it all.

    I doesn't matter what mic you use, unless you get your placement right, your are in for a world of hurt....(OK slight exaggeration)

    You may....(and this is a very loose may..) get some benefit from a reflection filter, but I would have a go at making one as opposed to laying doen cash, in case its a bust.

    Best of luck

    Tranzmute
     

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