problem with sharpness

Discussion in 'macOS' started by osin, Jun 15, 2008.

  1. osin macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2008
    Location:
    New Jersey
    #1
    I just started using Mac for the first time and noticed that fonts on all websites I visit aren't sharp as they use to be under the windows os. I'm using Safari and Firefox and same problem exist in both browsers. But when I run internet explorer thru vmware fusion everything seem to be alright.

    are there any options to change it?
     
  2. TuffLuffJimmy macrumors G3

    TuffLuffJimmy

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2007
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #2
    The fonts in OS X are aliased unlike in Windows. So the fonts in OS X look more like they would when they are printed, thus they don't look as sharp.
     
  3. The General macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2006
    #3
    The problem you are having is that you prefer a font rendering technology that is inferior.

    In Mac OS X, font's are anti-aliased with sub-pixel smoothing. It doesn't get any more accurate, nor does it get any clearer. You're just used to blocky nasty fonts in Windows.

    After a few weeks of Mac OS X, you'll be used to it and seeing the fonts in Windows will make you want to vomit.
     
  4. osin thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2008
    Location:
    New Jersey
  5. Killyp macrumors 68040

    Killyp

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2006
    #5
    No, there is no way of making OS X more like Windows.

    You will get used to it, and technically it's better to work with than the fonts in Windows - less information for your brain to process. With non-antialiased fonts, your brain has to 'decode' the lettering, wheras antialiased font is what your brain is used to seeing (printed text).
     
  6. The General macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2006
    #6
    You don't want to change it. That would be taking a step back in technology, image quality, and readability. I made three sample lines in Photoshop.

    The one on the left is totally aliased. This is how Windows renders fonts.

    The middle line is using anti-aliasing. It's crap. I'd rather have the one on the left.

    The one on the right is using sub-pixel smoothing. This is how Mac OS X renders fonts. It's the best way to render fonts.

    [​IMG]

    This is what they actually look like on screen (if you have a monitor with RGB pixels instead of BGR):

    [​IMG]

    The one on the right is the clear winner. It has three times the horizontal resolution.
     
  7. osin thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2008
    Location:
    New Jersey
    #7
    I totally understand that now and examples look great :)

    just my eyes do not want adjust that fast ;)
     
  8. The General macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2006
    #8
    Just give it a week or so and you'll be so used to it that you'll hate PCs just for their fonts. :)
     
  9. Verdanice macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2007
    #9
    I agree OS X does a better job with font rendering overall, but.... Windows has been using ClearType for ages. It hasn't been aliased (at least without the ClearType option) since pre-XP, I don't think.
     
  10. alphaod macrumors Core

    alphaod

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    Location:
    NYC
    #10
    Just turn on ClearView in Windows (Antialiasing)

    Your eyes will adjust faster.
     
  11. phoobo macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2008
    #11
    OS X fonts on laptops a physical problem for many users

    The font rendering problem was introduced with OS X, and Apple has so far not indicated a willingness to provide a more ergonomic option. A certain number of people struggle with the OS X renderings (particularly on laptop screens; I have not found this to be a problem on an iMac), and experience eye fatigue and headaches. Some people will not be able to get used to this no matter how hard they try.


    You can see a very intelligent forum on this topic here:
    http://www.atpm.com/12.01/paradigm.shtml?reload

    The solution, for the meantime, is to use Windows programs on the Mac for font-intensive work, or long hours of writing.
     

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