Problems with the Mac promised land

Discussion in 'macOS' started by GNice, Dec 5, 2007.

  1. GNice macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2007
    #1
    Interesting article. I'm a recent switcher and I've been fortunate that my experience with my iMac (and Leopard upgrade) have been very, very good. But I think the author is dead on. If you "promise" something, you need to be prepared to deliver...or suffer the consequences.

    http://www.news.com/8301-13579_3-9829091-37.html
     
  2. aristobrat macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2005
    #2
    I like the ending:

     
  3. Sky Blue Guest

    Sky Blue

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2005
  4. Draddy macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2007
    #4
    that was a great article..

    also, I didn't know 10.5 was such a huge change..

    http://www.news.com/5208-13579_3-0.html?forumID=1&threadID=33456&messageID=339589&start=-1

     
  5. Mlobo01 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2003
    Location:
    Weehawken New Jersey
    #5
    I read most of the article, and it seems full of naivete, I think that Cnet has always had a tinge of malignancy towards Apple, the author states:"...Im not one of these fans...or people who act like a cult member...I act more like a customer..." Thats not saying much since the whole article is very subjective, even the author's tone is peppered with malaise, The author shows a state of unrest and envy when he writes"Apple better be prepared to pay the consequences...I flamed at Apple for releasing the OS early..."A clear sign that he overestimates his importance, who is he and why should Apple wait? for when he says so? The only say so regarding Apple is Steve Jobs and Co. The bottom line regarding software is that we underestimate it's complexity, I have been writing articles since Jaguar and there have been always issues. Sometimes we Apple folk may seem like a cult but I prefer to see us as a close family of computer users, saying that we are a cult is feeling like an exile or feelings of inferiority(not my concern)whatever the author's peeves or short comings are(including his writings) its up to him to upgrade or shop responsibly. The legal detail in the installation box never mentions "promise" and by accepting the installation we accept all of its nuances and BUGS, what else to do? We as computer users whether Apple or PC need to start implementing better upgrading habits or use a more precise and methodical way to test OSs before they get installed in our main HD, also we need to start backing up data, why do we have Time Machine? it springs from a bad habit!...more since Im at work...
     
  6. Mlobo01 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2003
    Location:
    Weehawken New Jersey
    #6
    more since Im at work...

    I have learned since Jaguar that its productive to install any new OS on an external HD, boot from it, fix the bugs etc and when its acceptable you may install it on your main HD or computer, We have been through these same issues time and time again. When Jaguar came out it was the same heep of criers, specially from the cespool of cnet, when Panther came out cnet and co cried out the same old song, Im sure that if you search the cnet articles they will appear very similar, anyway how does that affect us? It shows that we need to be more diligent in our upgrading, more diligent in how we treat software and really think what is the value of upgrading systems, This notion has been taken up by Intel when they decided that instead of developing raw gigahertz power they where better off with a chip that consumes less power and has a scientific harmony with the rest of the machinery that governs it. in brief long-term planning outweighs instant muscle. My experience with Leopard has been great, I've learned a couple of things regarding fixes and hints but it also shows how the power of hype and how a tight commercial strategy impacts society, if the author of the article meant to say"have you ever seen an Apple commercial?" alluding to its high brow hue, then the answer is: Yes, we do remember it and retain it in our core, look at the 1984 commercial, do you remember any Dell commercial or Vista, or XP or W95? the answer is NO, Apple knows that by appealing to a higher form of advertising it can charm even the hardest of hards, Apple has an ideology and a style, Microsoft has no theme no style no unity of thought, look at its higher management (Ballmer, Gates, who are very similar to Eisner in orientation) Its hard to go against Style, and I can see why people may mistake their ads as "promises"
    well there advertising "Just works"....more soon
     

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