Become a MacRumors Supporter for $25/year with no ads, private forums, and more!

MacRumors

macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
54,613
16,748



Illustration app Procreate today updated its Procreate Pocket iPhone app to version 2.0, which developer Savage describes as "reengineered from the ground up" and "an entirely new app." Procreate Pocket 2 is powered by Silica-M, the same graphics engine that powers Procreate for iPad, as well as Apple's own Metal technology.

procreate-pocket-2.jpg

Savage says that with the upgraded technology boost in version 2.0, Procreate Pocket can now create canvases with rich P3 color depth, and users can choose from 136 hand-made brushes that include pencils, inks, wet painting, and digital-only abstract effects. Procreate Pocket also now includes "almost every Procreate feature from iPad," like ColorDrop, QuickLine, Perspective Guides, Layer Masks, custom brush creation, and more.

The developer specifically optimized Procreate Pocket 2 for iPhone X users, with features that take advantage of 3D Touch and haptic feedback.
"We literally threw the Procreate Pocket 1.0 codebase away and started fresh. Every pixel and every line of code is new, and we're so happy to finally bring Silica-M to our iPhone users," said James Cuda, CEO and co-founder of Savage.
The app is also gaining two new features not yet available on iPad, including Brush Set export and import, allowing artists to easily share their creations through online marketplaces or expand their own libraries with thousands of custom brushes from other users. The second addition is a 30 second time-lapse export, which uses a custom built algorithm to remove non-essential frames from any time-lapse and offers a shortened version that can easily be shared on social media.


Procreate Pocket 2 is available today on the iOS App Store as a free update for existing users, and those who haven't downloaded the app yet can do so for $4.99 [Direct Link].

Article Link: 'Procreate Pocket' Gets Major 2.0 Update With New Interface, Hundreds of Handcrafted Brushes, and More
 

Sheza

macrumors 68020
Aug 14, 2010
2,045
1,748
I mean, the app looks brilliant.

But I can't see how I would want to do any drawing on an iPhone with no Pencil support.
 
  • Like
Reactions: kazmac and max2

BrettArchibald

macrumors regular
Jul 31, 2007
116
642
I can't see how I would want to do any drawing on an iPhone with no Pencil support.

Good job you can use one of the many other stylus available.

I think the (obvious) point he meant is the ability to use a fine-tipped stylus, like, you know, a pencil, and not the other useless fat chunky crayons that are out there...

Or just learn to draw with your finger. It’s not that hard.

Why do people always have to counter with an argumentative contradictory rebuttal on how that person is somehow wrong, when someone gives their own opinion on something. Jeez...
There's a reason traditional artists tend to use the traditional equipment they do, as opposed to just dipping their fingers in paint and dragging their fingers all over a canvas... That's because finger-painting offers a LOT less control over what you can do.
I agree with the OP: if you are going to do painting on an iPhone, then it would be infinitely more preferable to do so with an Apple Pencil than with just your finger.
 
Last edited:

sneak3

macrumors 6502a
Oct 14, 2011
534
80
I hardly believe the paintings showed in the ad where done in the iphone haha
Doable but very pita.
 

TiggrToo

macrumors 68040
Aug 24, 2017
3,481
7,651
Out there...way out there
I hardly believe the paintings showed in the ad where done in the iphone haha
Doable but very pita.

I once thought much the same until I came across a video showing someone recreating the Mona Lisa in Microsoft Paint!


It's not the tool, it's the artist. Growing up I knew an artist with almost no fingers (just stubs) who painted British pub signs for a living.
 

CarlJ

Contributor
Feb 23, 2004
5,645
9,877
San Diego, CA, USA
But I can't see how I would want to do any drawing on an iPhone with no Pencil support.
I would expect it's not so much the iPhone being an artist's preferred platform, but more a matter of making use of what you have with you - if you're sitting in a waiting room for 15 minutes, you can work a bit more on that drawing you've been doing in spare minutes, or you can... uh, stare at the TV on the wall. Or, perhaps a teenager at school during lunchtime. Or someone sitting in a coffee shop for a bit.

As far as needing a finer point for detail work - yes, this is a problem. However, these sorts of drawing apps almost always let you zoom in on various parts, which gives sort of the equivalent of a finer point (Procreate also has an iPad version, and I suspect you can move pictures between the two). Again, it's not ideal, but if you have your phone in your pocket and you don't bring a sketchbook and pens/pencils everywhere you go...
 

Keane16

macrumors 6502a
Dec 8, 2007
810
671
I think the (obvious) point he meant is the ability to use a fine-tipped stylus, like, you know, a pencil, and not the other useless fat chunky crayons that are out there...

There are fine tipped stylus available too. Look harder. Wanting Pencil support is one thing, whining "I can't see how I would want to do any drawing on an iPhone with no Pencil support." is just lame. Plenty of people have created wonderful art using 3rd party stylus.
 

chucker23n1

macrumors 603
Dec 7, 2014
6,082
7,720
Or just learn to draw with your finger. It’s not that hard.

:rolleyes:

Is that how you feel about any tool? Just use your fist instead of a hammer? Just whistle instead of learning to play the flute?

Arguably, stylus support really shines on larger surfaces like those of an iPad Pro (or a Cintiq, a Surface Studio, etc.). But that doesn’t mean it’d be completely worthless on iPhone.

Apple probably doesn’t do it for a variety of reasons, such as making the display manufacturing process more complex for limited benefit, and wanting to sell more iPad Pros.
 
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.