Production Mac

Discussion in 'PowerPC Macs' started by eyoungren, Aug 13, 2015.

  1. eyoungren macrumors P6

    eyoungren

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2011
    Location:
    Phoenix • 85037
    #1
    Looking through some of my photos and ran across this one (attached).

    This was a couple of years ago. The G5 at work had either a logicboard or CPU failure (I've yet to determine which one it was) so my 17" PowerBook G4 DLSD filled in for three weeks as a production machine. Rolled right in and the 17" screen made things bearable.

    Not the first time I've done this. My old TiBook/400 served as a production machine for over a year before my boss bought the G5.

    IMG_0891.JPG
     
  2. Possumgal macrumors member

    Possumgal

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2015
    Location:
    N. Central Arkansas
    #2
    Don't suppose your boss reimbursed you for having to use your own equipment, did he?
     
  3. eyoungren thread starter macrumors P6

    eyoungren

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2011
    Location:
    Phoenix • 85037
    #3
    LOL. No. Not the way it works around here. :D

    Although I do allright by other means.

    The failure of the G5 meant he had to upgrade me (finally) to a MacPro. He let me keep the 'dead' G5 and wasn't aware that it only cost me $60 to swap out the logicboard and CPUs until I needed to bring the Mac back for my coworker. He reimbursed me the $60 then though. Our agreement now is that I get the G5 back free when he finally gets around to getting a new MacPro for me (and this one I am typing on goes to my coworker). That was over two years ago we agreed to that.

    He was annoyed that I didn't tell him about what I had done later on with the G5 - but had I done that I wouldn't have a MacPro right now at work. :D

    So, like I said - I have ways.
     
  4. Possumgal macrumors member

    Possumgal

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2015
    Location:
    N. Central Arkansas
    #4
    Gotta do what you gotta do. I've worked for a small paper, I know how it works. Or doesn't. In my case the paper was for sale, so they let everything go to pot.
     
  5. tevion5 macrumors 68000

    tevion5

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2011
    Location:
    Ireland
  6. eyoungren thread starter macrumors P6

    eyoungren

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2011
    Location:
    Phoenix • 85037
    #6
    Yeah I get hear you.

    My first job was a daily. Gannet owned and run. Gannet test lab facility for digital press. Dedicated IT department.

    So, right away I had some preconceptions about newspapers. Then I moved to Arizona and ran into family owned weeklies. All of a sudden I was my own IT person and there was (and is) never any budget for anything. Things get bought/replaced only when the consequence of not doing so will adversely affect profits.

    So you have to choose your timing…
     
  7. eyoungren thread starter macrumors P6

    eyoungren

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2011
    Location:
    Phoenix • 85037
    #7
    That's actually just that Apple webpage that was up when Steve first died. Just a printout of the image on 11x17" paper.

    I like it though. :D Thanks!
     
  8. bunnspecial macrumors 603

    bunnspecial

    Joined:
    May 3, 2014
    Location:
    Kentucky
    #8
    Our local newspaper is sort of in-between the two extremes-it's still 6 days a week-5 days in the afternoon and then Sunday morning. Most weekdays, you can tell that they're scraping to even fill up 8 pages(two sheets) for the main section. It wouldn't surprise me if they go to 3 or 4 days a week within the next year or two.

    It was a big deal a year and a half ago when their 50-year old press broke down and they finally had to conclude that it wasn't economical to keep printing onsite. The paper is now printed by the Gannet-owned Courier Journal an hour up the road in Louisville.
     
  9. eyoungren thread starter macrumors P6

    eyoungren

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2011
    Location:
    Phoenix • 85037
    #9
    Newsprint is dying.

    A lot of papers have tried to make the leap to web and a lot of majors did that a long time ago - which is why we have aggravating pay walls online. But the smaller shops (like us) have to depend on other companies to get us there - like townnews.com, which services thousands of small papers across the country.

    But our advertising on line while steady is stagnant (I get maybe one web ad every three or four months and it's just an update) and there are only so many spots. We have increased our content, but our main product is the actual printed newspaper.

    No one has yet cracked the code of getting people to pay for news content online in a way that can support a small business. Larger businesses, or websites that were started as online content to begin with have the market.

    This is the third family owned newspaper I have worked for. I am just hoping that by the time the place folds (it will) both my kids will be either in college or graduating from college. Of the three I have worked for, one was sold to a company when the owner retired. His kids refused to take on the business. The same is going to happen here as not one of the three grandchildren of the owner is interested.

    Two years ago they made me manager and shortly after that we stopped printing our own paper. We have a Goss Community 300, 4-station press downstairs that has sat idle for two years and is slowly being parted out. As I type this I have a reminder of my hometown paper that my dad sent me. An article and a photo of a forklift tearing down that paper's press for scrap. It's all online now.

    But we only had two options two years ago. Continue printing our own paper and give our customers subpar printing on an old press that had limited color options or send PDFs to the local big-time printer and be able to offer the customer a lot more with better quality.

    Upgrading the press would have been upwards of $100,000 and would have only put us at the bottom technology-wise. So, the owner, who bought this place in the mid-50s (the press came from TRW's book printing division) was forced to go with the local printer. He's a print man so this gauls him, but there's no way the company could have afforded to upgrade the press.

    I consider this to have been the first nail in the coffin. What's been protecting us is the fact that we print the legals for two citys (Glendale and Peoria, AZ) and are considered to be the community newspapers for those cities.

    Just hoping I've got another decade.
     

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