Protecting Information no MBP 2015 15"

newyorkcity

macrumors member
Original poster
Sep 19, 2012
33
0
I just got a brand new MBP and before I set it up what is the best way to protect my data on it? Some people say Firevault 2, but is this a good option or is there better options? Does it slow the computer down any? Anything else I should consider?
 

yjchua95

macrumors 604
Apr 23, 2011
6,725
230
GVA, KUL, MEL (current), ZQN
I just got a brand new MBP and before I set it up what is the best way to protect my data on it? Some people say Firevault 2, but is this a good option or is there better options? Does it slow the computer down any? Anything else I should consider?
FileVault doesn't slow down the computer. FV2 uses XTA-AES-128 and AES-256, and these two are practically uncrackable. It'd still take millions (if not thousands) of years for all the most powerful computers in the world combined to crack these two.

Afaik, there isn't anything better than AES as of yet.
 

mlsusa

macrumors regular
Sep 17, 2012
148
11
Don't forget your password and make sure you have your recovery in a safe place. If you forget your password and can't find or get to your recovery key, nothing can be done by Apple to help you unlock the drive and you're data is inaccessible. Apple not having other options to unlock the drive is by design and part of keeping your data secure.

Not so much a disadvantage, more like something you shouldn't take lightly.
 

newyorkcity

macrumors member
Original poster
Sep 19, 2012
33
0
Don't forget your password and make sure you have your recovery in a safe place. If you forget your password and can't find or get to your recovery key, nothing can be done by Apple to help you unlock the drive and you're data is inaccessible. Apple not having other options to unlock the drive is by design and part of keeping your data secure.

Not so much a disadvantage, more like something you shouldn't take lightly.
sounds great! thanks!
 

Mr. Retrofire

macrumors 603
Mar 2, 2010
5,040
451
www.emiliana.cl/en
FileVault doesn't slow down the computer. FV2 uses XTA-AES-128 and AES-256, and these two are practically uncrackable. It'd still take millions (if not thousands) of years for all the most powerful computers in the world combined to crack these two.
This is only true regarding brute force attacks. Mathematical attacks break encryption algorithms faster (RC4, MD5, SHA-1 are already broken). The usual weak passwords play also a big role.