Protectors, ND filters and Circular Polarizers

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by flosseR, Aug 27, 2009.

  1. flosseR macrumors 6502a

    flosseR

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2009
    Location:
    the cold dark north
    #1
    Right, I have protectors on 3 of my lenses because when I started in Photography I was told to get them by a Pro photographer. But I am considering now of buying a couple of NDx4 filters for my bigger (ring size) lenses at 72 and 77mm. Circular polarizers are expensive but are they worth it? I want the NDx4 filters for bright sunlight shots.

    What filters do you use (the screw in type, not the ND Grad systems which are too burdensome for me).

    //FR
     
  2. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Location:
    Northern/Central VA
    #2
    While a CPL blocks light, it also affects the light differently than a straight ND filter- you should figure out if you want polarization or if it'll hurt your images if your question is ND or CPL- because a CPL will polarize one plane of reflection at a time and deepen sky colors, if you're shooting multi-faceted surfaces or running water, you'll get different results with one versus the other.

    I use a Lee Gelsnap with square filters because then I only need one for all my lenses up to I think 83mm and the ND set with 3 filters wasn't all that expensive, but I don't find them cumbersome, and find not having to deal with glass filters in the field is a plus.
     
  3. Doylem macrumors 68040

    Doylem

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2006
    Location:
    Wherever I hang my hat...
    #3
    One problem with a circular grey-grad filter is that you can't move it up and down (to control where the 'grad' takes effect). I use a rectangular grey grad instead...
     
  4. Joe King macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Location:
    Dublin, Ireland
    #4
    I use Hoya Pro1 filters - ND and CPL. Nice and thin, which is useful for avoiding vignetting on my wide-angle Sigma 10-20mm.

    Rather than going to the expense of buying both 72 and 77mm filters, invest in a 72 to 77mm adapter ring for your 72mm lens and then you only need to buy 77mm filters.

    Regarding grad filters, you don't always have to use the filter holder; you can simply hold it in front of the lens with your hand (assuming of course you are not using it on long exposures).
     
  5. dazey macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2005
    #5
    I don't believe in the clear filters. If you really want to protect a front element use a hood on it and a screw in one.

    As the other poster, I have a couple of 77mm ND filters (hoya pro) and a B+W kaisman circular polariser and then adaptors to fit it on smaller threads.
     
  6. flosseR thread starter macrumors 6502a

    flosseR

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2009
    Location:
    the cold dark north
    #6
    ask and you will never guess what you get. :) I didnt even think as simple as using a step up ring, i thought much more complicated :) and expensive.... I just sent a mail to a local shop for a square snap on as well.. thanks for input guys.

    One more thing, I read somewhere that UV filters can actually "harm" a picture... anyone care to explain in which way that is? they just block UV light from say water reflections, right?

    //FR
     
  7. Cliff3 macrumors 65816

    Cliff3

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2007
    Location:
    SF Bay Area
    #7
    I use both ND and CPL filters. As noted above, they each have their own applications. I also have graduated ND filters that fit into a square Cokin P holder, but I don't use them all that much. I second the recommendation to standardize on a filter size and use a step-up ring to avoid buying multiple filters. In line with that approach, you can also buy inexpensive screw-in lens hoods since your bayonet hood isn't going to fit over that step-up ring. You will need to be mindful of vignetting on wide angle lenses if you start stacking too much stuff on the end of the lens.

    As far as brands go, I am partial to B+W. My thin profile 77mm CPL is from Nikon, as is the drop-in CPL for my 300 f2.8.
     
  8. Phrasikleia macrumors 601

    Phrasikleia

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2008
    Location:
    Over there------->
    #8
    A CPL will give you some control over reflections, allowing you to increase or reduce them. It will also help with shooting in harsh light, since it can tone down the highlights. An ND simply allows you to use longer shutter speeds. I use both, sometimes in combination for artistic effects.
     

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