PS3 Hard Drive to iMac Hard Drive

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by AGuzik360, May 10, 2009.

  1. AGuzik360 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 10, 2009
    Location:
    Minnesota
    #1
    So heres the dilemma. I have a Sony HDR-CX12 which I have been saving the video and picture files to my 60 GB PS3 Hard Drive. I have tried copying those files back to the Sony Pro Duo 8GB memory card...then putting the card back in the camcorder and connecting it to my iMac so I can import, edit, and mess around with them in iMovie. Problem is they show up but as a mts file that iMovie won't let me import. Now the real cracker is that when should I shoot video and then without saving it to my PS3 but instead hooking it up with the iMac it seems to be able to import just fine. Can someone please tell me how to get those files back to the original state they were in when I first shot them. I have about 50 GB of video saved on my PS3. I did download VoltaicHD and tried a few clips but it seems that anything longer than a few minutes is gonna take days to convert and export. Not to mention that I'm getting error messages from VoltaicHD (a questionable $35 spent but figured that if it would convert all those files it would be worth it) Also I've been reading that converting these files with Voltaic is gonna make these files turn huge. (1 hour of HD video is about 8 GB so if it makes them even 2x or 3x bigger we're talking about my terrabyte filling up in no time) Any ideas...I don't mind buying software if it works. Thanks
     
  2. spinnerlys Guest

    spinnerlys

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2008
    Location:
    forlod bygningen
    #2
    With HD footage, that you want to edit, you have to take into account HDD space. Your footage is highly compresses, and unsuitable for editing, so iMovie needs a more spacious file.


    Normal DV footage, which is only HD, takes 12GB per hour, so 24GB (8GBx3) wouldn't be that much.
    HDDs are cheap nowadays and should be no problem.

    Be glad you didn't shoot in HDV, it takes 1GB per minute.

    So use Volltaic for the 50GB amount of files.

    http://forums.macrumors.com/archive/index.php/t-339335.html

    http://www.google.com/cse?cx=011016...e:forums.macrumors.com&hl=en&as_qdr=all&meta=
     
  3. arjen92 macrumors 65816

    arjen92

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2008
    Location:
    Below sea level
    #3
    On what do you base that. I've read that HDV1 even smaller is than normal DV.
    DV is 25 Mbps and HDV1 19.2 Mbps.
    (besides, if hdv would be so much bigger than DV, how comes you can record the same length HDV (1 hour) as DV (1 hour) on the same tape?)

    And you don't need to convert HDV to edit it. So it saves much more space.
     
  4. TheNightPhoenix macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2005
    #4

    You are correct but... The OP is using iMovie,
    It converts HDV into Apple Intermediate.
    I think that is where the confusion has come from.
     
  5. spinnerlys Guest

    spinnerlys

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2008
    Location:
    forlod bygningen
    #5
    @ arjen92:

    I based it on experience.

    HDV records a MPEG-2 stream onto the tape, and yes, you're right, the data rate is between 19.7 Mbit/s (720p) and 25 Mbit/s (1080i).

    When I used FCP to capture the footage, I used the HDV preset, but don't remember which codec was used, but most likely AIC (Apple Intermediate Codec).
    As MPEG-2 is unsuitable for editing, the codec I used has saved the HDV stream as something more suitable and more spacey (AIC).

    As MPEG-2 uses GOP (Group Of Pictures), the video is saved in a lossy format.
    Editing with lossy formats is not recommended, so FCP converted it AIC, so that every frame is stored and not every 15th or so with GOP MPEG-2.


    That's why one minute of HDV footage encoded to AIC takes up 1GB.
    DV footage takes up 204 MB per minute, so it's a fifth of HDV.
    As DV resolution is also a fifth of 1080i resolution, it's logical to have such numbers.



    PAL DV: 720*576 = 414.720 pixel - 204 MB/min
    HDV 1080i: 1920*1080 = 2.073.6000 - 1 GB/min
     

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