Publishers and Their Imprints

Discussion in 'iPad' started by Epicurus, Mar 31, 2010.

  1. Epicurus macrumors 6502

    Epicurus

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2005
    Location:
    Minneapolis, MN
    #1
    I've been trying to get my head around the publishing business in preparation for getting my iPad. Apple signed some deals with some publishers, but it is hard to tell what that really means without taking a look at the larger corporate structures. Even then, just because a particular press signs a deal doesn't mean all their back catalog will appear in the store overnight. The best anyone can hope for is a positive indication for the future. Some of these companies are onboard with Apple to some degree, others have only made vague pronouncements about ebooks in general. My hope is that by better understanding the structure at work here, I can get a better picture of how the iBookstore content might evolve in the months to come.

    Random House
    Random House Publishing Group
    Ballantine Books
    Bantam
    Delacorte
    DelRey
    Dial Press
    Modern Library​
    Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
    Alfred A. Knopf
    Anchor Books
    Doubleday
    Everyman's Library
    Pantheon Books
    Vintage​
    Random House Information Group
    Fodor's Travel
    Princeton Review
    Sylvan Learning​
    Crown Publishing Group
    Billboard
    Crown
    Three Rivers Press​

    Pearson PLC
    The Penguin Group - Launch partner with Apple
    Avery
    Dutton
    Plume
    Puffin
    Penguin
    Penguin Putnam
    Viking​
    Pearson Education
    Addison-Wesley
    Prentice Hall
    Pearson Scott Foresman​
    Financial Times
    The Economist​

    Thomson Reuters Publishing
    Reuters
    Westlaw
    FindLaw
    Physician's Desk Reference
    Arden Shakespeare
    Web of Science
    EndNote
    Derwent World Patent Index
    Thomson Scientific​

    O'Reilly Media - Offers DRM free EPUB books already
    Microsoft Press
    No Starch Press
    Paraglyph Press
    PC Publishing
    Pragmatic Bookshelf
    Rocky Nook
    SitePoint​

    John Wiley & Sons
    Betty Crocker
    Blackwell
    Cliff Notes
    For Dummies
    Frommer's
    WROX
    Webster's New World​

    Simon & Schuster - Launch partner with Apple
    Atria
    Free Press
    Howard Books
    Pocket Books
    Scribner
    Touchstone and Fireside Group​

    McGraw-Hill
    McGraw-Hill Higher Education
    Glencoe/McGraw-Hill
    Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
    McGraw-Hill Professional
    Wright Group/McGraw-Hill​

    Hachette Book Group - Launch partner with Apple
    Springboard Press
    Little, Brown and Company
    Back Bay Books
    Orbit Press​

    Springer Science+Business Media
    Springer-Verlag
    Birkhauser-Verlag
    Apress
    Kluwer​

    Taylor & Francis Group
    Routledge
    CRC Press
    Marcel Dekker
    Institute of Physics​

    Perseus Books Group
    DaCapo
    Basic Books
    Vanguard Press​

    Harper Collins - Launch partner with Apple
    Avon
    Ecco
    Harper Perennial​

    W. W. Norton
    Norton Critical Editions
    Pegasus Books
    Pushcart Books​

    Macmillan Publishers - Launch partner with Apple
    Nature (journal)
    Pan Macmillan​

    Elsevier
    Academic Press
    Pergamon Press​

    Houghton Mifflin
    Harcourt​

    Dover Publishing

    W. H. Freeman

    World Scientific Publishing

    --

    And then there are the University presses, most of which are independently run.

    University of Chicago Press
    MIT Press
    Oxford University Press
    Cambridge University Press
    Princeton University Press
     
  2. Slava macrumors member

    Slava

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2006
    #2
    Thank you for posting this, it's pretty useful info.
     
  3. Squeak825 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2007
    #3
    Your McGraw-Hill one is wrong.

    Harcourt is part of Houghton Mifflin.

    McGraw-Hill has the following imprints:
    McGraw-Hill Higher Education
    Glencoe/McGraw-Hill
    Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
    McGraw-Hill Professional
    Wright Group/McGraw-Hill
     
  4. talkingnewmedia macrumors regular

    talkingnewmedia

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2009
    Location:
    Chicago
    #4
    One of the problems is that the word "partner" can mean different things.

    For instance, HarperCollins, Hachette, Penguin, Macmillan and Simon & Shuster have all signed deals to appear in iBookstore, while Random House has not. On the other hand, Penguin is fully committed to the iPad but has said they they want to create individual apps for books. They are all "partners" (except for Random House).

    Another point: the "deal". Some web sites have been reporting that these publishers have signed "deals", when all they really mean is that they have "committed" to selling through the iPad.

    My guess is that those waiting for the textbook publishers may be disappointed: there is so much profit in textbook publishing that few of the big players -- like McGraw-Hill and Pearson -- will not want to do anything that will effect their profits. That means they will either price their books very high in iBookstore, or else create expensive apps.
     
  5. Squeak825 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2007
    #5
    You are right.....McGraw-Hill and Pearson will not sell through the iBookstore and give 30% of the revenue to APPL.

    Apps will be free in which you type in a redemption code that you buy offline to get your books.
     
  6. Epicurus thread starter macrumors 6502

    Epicurus

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2005
    Location:
    Minneapolis, MN
    #6
    Thanks. I missed the 2007 merger. I've updated the first post.

    With respect to Apple's "partnerships" with these publishers, every indication I've gotten from what little has been said in public is that the names Apple flashed at the initial announcement had at least agreed to take a look at the iPad and offer something for it. Any one of these publishers has tens of thousands of books in the catalog, and nobody really expects any significant fraction of that number to be in the iBookstore on day one. The Kindle has been at this for years and it is still missing some of my favorite books...

    The one thing I learned from trying to put together that list is that publishers are not exactly working in a streamlined corporate structure. Imprints and divisions are sold from one group to another every year or so, with partial ownership deals popping up all over the place. When Apple spoke about the work the Kindle did in paving the way for the iPad, they weren't kidding. I can't imagine the trouble Amazon had to go through to get their initial ebook offerings.

    And as for textbooks, they are moving to ebooks faster than anybody, but they are targeting a subscription model. This lets them dump the print publishing costs (physical production and shipping) and kill the used book market in one move. Having a custom app gets their content on the iPad and avoids the iBookstore EPUB download issue. I frankly hate this proposition, but that's how it'll be starting out. It won't be until every college student has an iPad and access to equally compelling alternative reference material (EPUB, web, or other) that "textbook" prices will normalize. But that's a long way off yet.
     

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