purchasing new camera

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by emjaycee18, Aug 7, 2011.

  1. emjaycee18 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2010
    #1
    I'm looking to buy a new camera, specifically the Sony DSCHX100V/B. I've found mixed posts as to whether or not iPhoto, iMovie, and Quicktime supports the video formats from this camera (or a lot of HD formats). Does any one know or have experience imports videos from their camera, specifically in AVCHD 60i/60p. The camera also records in MP4 / MPEG-4 AVC(H.264), I'm guessing that there definitely is support to import these formats, but the quality isn't as good.

    Any info is much appreciated.
     
  2. musique macrumors regular

    musique

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2009
    #2
    From what I understand, some of the newer video editing software like Premiere Pro and FCP X can let you edit H.264 directly. However, it's not recommended because it's a display format, not an editing format. You'd be better served to convert the H.264 video to an format better suited for editing (like ProRes 244 or ProRes LT).

    I'm just starting to use Premiere Pro and it tries to do this in the background. In FCS it did the conversion when you brought the video in for initial use.

    And I think AVCHD can be brought into iMovie. I know that Premiere Pro and Final Cut can bring it in too.

    Good luck.
     
  3. VirtualRain macrumors 603

    VirtualRain

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2008
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    #3
    I notice in a quick search that this camera doesn't support a RAW image capture format for stills. If you're serious about the still photo capabilities, that's something you might want to consider.

    As for video... Besides what Musique has to say, you might want to check with the folks that hang out in the video forum.
     
  4. emjaycee18, Aug 8, 2011
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2011

    emjaycee18 thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2010
  5. emjaycee18 thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2010
    #5
    I'm an extreme novice when it comes to photography. What are the advantages of RAW format over that of jpeg?

    Ideally I'm just looking to by a high end point and shoot because my wife is expecting. I don't know enough about cameras to use a DSLR, so I was hoping that a nice point and shoot would generate some quality photos. I'm not going to be doing a ton of editing; some cropping, minor enhancements, and coloration are pretty much what my limits are.
     
  6. VirtualRain macrumors 603

    VirtualRain

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2008
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    #6
    RAW is the native output from the Camera before any in-camera adjustments and compression is applied. It give you maximum quality and flexibility to make adjustments. It's certainly not essential... you can take perfectly great photos without RAW support, but it's something you might wish you had later on if you get deeper into photography and tweaking your photos.

    Something to consider... for about the same budget, you can get a Canon T3 Digital SLR camera. Even on fully auto, this camera would probably provide better images than a high-end point and shoot... and it would provide you with so many more options down the road. Just a thought.
     
  7. h1r0ll3r macrumors 68040

    h1r0ll3r

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2009
    Location:
    Maryland
    #7
    Might wanna take a look at the Canon S95 if you just want a really high end P&S. Or if you're willing to spend a smidge more, check out the Canon G12 as well.

    For those prices, you might be able to get an older DSLR as well however, considering your needs, I think either of the above mentioned cameras would work just fine for you. I hear the S95 in particular gets a lot of nice reviews.

    RAW files simply allow you to do more post processing to the photo. The JPG is simply an image. You would still be able to do some minor editing of the photo but nothing near to what you can do with a RAW file. RAW files are generally larger in size than JPG's so you'll need to keep that in mind.
     
  8. Maxpilot macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2009
    Location:
    Midwest
    #8
    The best camera is the one you have with you. I stopped carrying a large DSLR around a long time ago. I can fit my camera in my pocket.

    You are wanting a pocket size camera that take good video. I have the Sony DSC-HX5V that takes wonderful 1080i HD video in AVCHD format. In iMovie, I do an Archive from Camera, then do an Import from the Archive to build my movie projects. The reason I do that in that order is when you do an archive first, it saves everything from you camera, including the still photos. Import the movies from archive in full size. Search for Steve Mullen on Google for more iMovie editing tips.
     

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