Push vs Pull Email?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by TimJim, Jul 20, 2007.

  1. TimJim macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    May 15, 2007
    #1
    i have the Motorola Q which is a windows mobile phone. I downloaded the app off Yahoo called Yahoo Go. When i run the app i can check my mail along with other things. When I clicked Options under Mail, it gave me an option to turn on push email and turn off pull email and vice-versa.

    My question is whats the difference between the two, and since that app on my phone isent running all the time, will one of the settings cause the app to be running all the time in turn losing me more battery time?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. RojoLeo macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2007
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    #2
    With push e-mail, it basically sends a small, invisible text message to your device telling it to pull your email, thus giving it the appearance of pushing the e-mail to the device automatically. This is also true for Exchange push mail on Windows mobile devices. And yes, the text messages count against your limit - make sure you have unlimited text or your bill will be quite high.

    And yes, it will eat into your battery life.
     
  3. yg17 macrumors G5

    yg17

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2004
    Location:
    St. Louis, MO
    #3
    Not entirely true. Exchange DOES NOT use text messages, so you don't get charged. Exchange isn't really "push" on Windows Mobile devices, rather your phone sends out a small ping to the server every few seconds, and if you have new e-mail, the server responds back with your message. It's not push, but it only takes a couple seconds from the time a message is sent to when you get it on your phone
     
  4. RojoLeo macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2007
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    #4
    I'm sorry, but that's not entirely correct either. Perhaps different phones handle this their own way, but here's my experience:

    I administer a Windows 2003 environment with Exchange. I use a Verizon XV6700 Pocket PC phone with Windows Mobile 5 to connect to the server. Verizon showed hundreds of text messages on the account, while there's were only two dozen or so actual text messages transmitted in that first month.

    Every communication between the Exchange server and the device was recorded as a text message.
     
  5. yg17 macrumors G5

    yg17

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2004
    Location:
    St. Louis, MO
    #5
    Then something is weird on your end. I have a Windows Mobile phone, use direct push, do not have a text plan, and don't get charged a thing

    http://mobiko.blogs.com/mutant/2006/11/microsoft_direc.html


    The image on that page explains it. If Verizon's charging you, they're screwing you over.

    The fact that I can remove my SIM card and use DirectPush over my phone's WiFi connection means that it doesn't use SMS.
     
  6. RojoLeo macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2007
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    #6
    Don't be so quick to assume. We're both right.

    I did some more research and it seems as though Exchange's method of direct push to mobile devices changed with SP2 for Exchange.

    It's discussed lightly here.
     
  7. yg17 macrumors G5

    yg17

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2004
    Location:
    St. Louis, MO
    #7
    Ahhh...OK then ;)

    The non-SMS implementation is much better :D
     
  8. zflauaus macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2004
    #8
    It used to use text messages, but now it doesn't. Back in the days of WinMob 2003, Verizon had a texting pack (PDA SMS 2000) that was basically to cover all the notifications to pull the email down to your phone. This was also extended into WinMob 5 until the MSFP (Microsoft Security and Features Pack) and Exchange 2003 SP2 were released so you can now get true push email on your phone if it can take it.

    The plan is still around, but you have to dive very, very deep into Verizon's system to get it as it is not officially supported anymore and it has been taken off people's accounts without their consent.
     

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