Question about constant CPU use for my Mid-2012 Macbook Pro 13in.

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Chtibi, Apr 25, 2013.

  1. Chtibi macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2013
    #1
    Hi Mac Rumors. I have a 13inch Macbook Pro from mid 2012. I have been running a java program overnight and during the day when I'm not using my laptop. So, my laptop's on pretty much 24/7. I have a picture of everything closed down except XRG and the Activity Monitor. I was wondering if I'd be causing any damage by running this overnight or having my Macbook at a constant usage such as pictured. Thank you.

    EDIT: I just looked at my XRG again. my uptime is actually 8 days.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. simsaladimbamba

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    #2
  3. justperry macrumors 604

    justperry

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    #3
    But you could use more RAM, you have 4 GB only and there are quite a few page outs.
     
  4. Chtibi thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Apr 25, 2013
    #4
    What about having it run for most of the day. I read that post but even if it's not at the top degree wouldn't constant use at a mid-high level would be bad? It gets kinda warm.

    Yeah I know, I was thinking of upgrading to 8 gigs. I'll do that in the near future.
     
  5. simsaladimbamba

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    #5
    Those temperatures are fine for prolonged usage, if it would be over 100° C all the time, it might damage components in some years.

    As the guide I linked to explains, those temperatures are well under the actual limit of the CPU.
     
  6. justperry macrumors 604

    justperry

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    #6
    FYI, your CPU is only using 20% of it's capacity, it may seem to you that it is 65% but some/many processes use all cores.
     
  7. thundersteele macrumors 68030

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    #7
    It's a bit more than 20% in practice, since single thread processes can benefit from turbo boost.
     

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