question about Leopard!

Discussion in 'macOS' started by gregdrummeraz, Mar 4, 2008.

  1. gregdrummeraz macrumors 6502

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    Glendale, az
    #1
    Is Leopard 32 or 64 bit? How could I find out if this differs?

    Thanks,
    Greg
     
  2. Amdahl macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2004
    #2
    The core OS is 64-bit on 64-bit CPUs, 32-bit on 32-bit CPUs. Most (99%) apps are 32-bit.
     
  3. gregdrummeraz thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #3



    I have a 2.2Ghz core 2 duo. that would be 64bit os right?

    :rolleyes:

    can it take 4GB of ram and utilize it?
     
  4. DoFoT9 macrumors P6

    DoFoT9

    Joined:
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    Singapore
    #4
    oh yes the santa rosa platforms and the platform before that (whatever that was called) can utilize 4gb of RAM. from my knowledge only the core duo (my lapy) cannot address that much.. so yea...

    i think santa rosa can go higher than 4gb?? not quite sure thers a thread floating around somewhere
     
  5. gregdrummeraz thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #5



    what is santa rosa for?:D



    thanks for the info! btw!
     
  6. gregdrummeraz thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #6
    :confused: also! I am a drummer also. for ten years. :rolleyes: love it! finally getting places!:cool:
     
  7. TheStu macrumors 65816

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    Carlisle, PA
    #7
    Santa Rosa is the intel codename for the chipset in the newest MacBooks and MacBook Pros. For the enduser of these machines it means that the RAM limit went from 3GB (in the first Core 2 Duos) to 4GB (in the newest ones). This could be construed as an artificial limit since some have said that Santa Rosa actually supports 8GB of RAM.

    However, whether or not Santa Rosa supports 8GB of RAM is moot as of this writing. The MacBooks and MacBook Pros only have 2 RAM slots, and the highest capacity laptop RAM sticks sold are only 2 GB. So, 2*2GB=4GB.

    As far as the 32/64bit question. That really doesn't matter. Take Tiger (10.4) for example, which was a 32bit OS. I have used PowerMacs with Tiger and 8GB of RAM on them, and all 8GB was available to the OS. OS X handles the 32/64bit situation differently than Windows.
     
  8. DoFoT9 macrumors P6

    DoFoT9

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    Location:
    Singapore
    #8
    lol santa rosa is the codename given to the chipset.. its getting confusing ther is waaaay to much stuff to remember.

    for all of you people :p

    the MBP's only currently support 4gb of RAM. (as explained in here http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=447947 )

    and here *a lil bit confuddling and nerdy*

    not just yet :(... but maybe soon!!
     
  9. Amdahl macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2004
    #9
    Actually, they are much the same (Windows & OS X). 32-bit Windows OS can access more than 4GB as well. 32-bit Intel CPUs support 36-bit addressing, known by the CPU feature PAE. The trick is that a 32-bit app can't access more than 2GB or 3GB (boot option) on Windows at once. It has to flip between memory ranges instead, and only access one of them at any given instant.
     
  10. gregdrummeraz thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Glendale, az
    #10



    what!!!!!?!?!?!???:confused::rolleyes:
     

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