Question about Objective-C practices

Discussion in 'Mac Programming' started by danielTechno, Nov 8, 2011.

  1. danielTechno macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2011
    #1
    Hello MacRumors users,
    This is my first thread on MacRumors here asking a question.

    Currently I'm a beginner programmer which know VB.net and Java, and interested to be professional in iPhone programming so I've started learning and I got a question.

    I've done some videos on Lynda.com on Objective c topic such as collections, variables, memory management and so on and I'm willing to focus on more subjects later on but my question is:
    I feel that listening to videos and writing the code is not enough, so I need some practices. Do anyone know a website which give some projects ideas to do to let me just practice? (Keep in mind I'm learning console application, later on I'll master iPhone programming)

    Also if you have any advice, please write it below.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Mac_Max macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2004
    #2
    Not really specific to Objective C per se but you might want to try implementing various projects you've already done in VB.net in Objective C. Another good exercise is to implement some of the Gang of Four design patterns in Objective C on your own and then looking up the "correct" solution online. Whenever I learn a new language or toolkit I tend to employ those strategies.
     
  3. chown33 macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    #3
    1. Project Euler.
    The problems are concisely stated, and it's not hard to find other people's programs, so you can easily check your work.

    This gives you practice in understanding problems, breaking things down, exploring algorithms, and writing programs from scratch.

    2. Basic computer games.
    First, learn the simple BASIC language the games are written in. Then use that knowledge to reverse-engineer how each game works. Then rewrite the game in Objective-C, using simple C scanf() and printf() for player I/O, if needed.

    This gives you practice in understanding existing programs, written by others, in an uncomplicated language that may be hard to unravel. It also gives you practice in going from code to concept then back to code.

    All the above skills are useful, and will be reused over and over again.
     

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