Question about OSX (Why so easy)?

Discussion in 'macOS' started by sup3r1or, Sep 9, 2010.

  1. sup3r1or macrumors regular

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    #1
    Please do not get the wrong idea with this post.

    I was wondering today, I know OSX is not windows that you need to crack and have licence key, but whats oSX defence agains copying? Or they simply do not care?

    I heard that each Snow Leopard is locked for each computer, however 2 days ago I downloading Retail ISO from Bittorrent which I installed and it works like a charm, why is that?

    Why I did that is simple, my OSX Install DVD (Genuine) broke because my MBP drive scratched the hell out of it. I'm waiting for replacement, it has been 5 days and I still didnt get anything. Just bought a new HDD so I needed a system to do my work. I was thinking once I get my real DVD back I will re-install the system, but since this downloaded one working fine and updating, do I really have to go through all the fuss of reinstalling again?
     
  2. Xavier macrumors 68020

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    #2
    Downloading a copy of Mac OS X and installing it instead of buying a copy is illegal.
     
  3. Hellhammer Moderator

    Hellhammer

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    #3
    No it's not. OP has license for Snow Leopard, that's all he needs. Whether you downloaded it from a torrent, borrowed your mate's disc or bought it from the store, it doesn't matter. The license is all you need.

    OS X comes with every Mac so there is no much point on investing for anti-piracy system. It always causes extra hassle and people gets angry. Besides, people who want it for free would get it for free anyway. It takes me less time to crack Windows 7 than enter the serial.
     
  4. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #4
    The system disk included with your computer is locked to the type of mac you bought, i.e., MBP system disks won't work for an iMac.

    Retail OSX doesn't care what type of mac you have. The only thing you don't get is iLife.

    Personally, while the torrent version got you going, I'd call apple for a replacement of the system disk. Its always handy to have them around.
     
  5. sup3r1or thread starter macrumors regular

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    #5
    I see, thanks for the info guys.

    I do own iLife anyway already it came with my mac that cd is still working. I called to Apple they said it is on the way but that was like 3 days ago and I still didnt get anything.

    Anyway only thing I want to know even if I installed this Snow Leopard that I got from BT, I DO NOT have to format and install again when my disc arrived right? I mean there is no differences in systems right?

    I had problem with a lot of disc permissions were incorrect but I think this has nothing to do with copy I got?
     
  6. Hellhammer Moderator

    Hellhammer

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    #6
    If they are both retail, then there shouldn't be differences. Permissions errors are common, there is nothing wrong with the disc
     
  7. rprebel macrumors 6502

    rprebel

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    #7
    There's always the chance that the copy you got off BT has some malicious code. If it were me, I'd reinstall when the disc arrives in the mail.

    Odds are, you're fine. If that's good enough for you, then enjoy your SL.
     
  8. snberk103 macrumors 603

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    #8
    Just a word of warning. The only known malware for OS X are a couple of trojans that come along with Photoshop and iWork downloaded from non-Apple sources. While OS X from BT, as far as I know, has yet to have a trojan attached - it is always possible. To be absolutely safe reformat and reinstall when the disk from Apple arrives. Or, if you aren't paranoid pay attention to the Mac news sites for a few weeks to see if anyone else is reporting trojans attached to OS X from non-Apple sources.

    As long as you have a legal license for OS X (current version) then I believe you are complying with the intention of the license.
     
  9. MonkeyET macrumors 6502

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    #9
    The concept of honesty can be hard to handle.:)
     
  10. mzlin macrumors member

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    #10
    simple answer

    Apple makes its profits off hardware. Software is seen as part of the hardware experience. Apple can afford not to copy protect its software as it's making most of its profit from the hardware sales anyway. However, if Microsoft didn't copy protect Windows it would lose a huge chunk of revenue to unlicensed installations.

    Microsoft was quite a bit more lax about going after cracked versions early in the history of Windows and Office. Back then I think they understood that a large part of their popularity among amateur enthusiasts and internationally had to do with its effective zero cost. Once Microsoft became permanently dominant, then it made sense to end this unofficial demo program.
     
  11. sup3r1or thread starter macrumors regular

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    #11

    Trojans for OSX? Arent trojans supposed to be designed only for windows?
    Actually is there any point to install Antivirus for OSX, to be honest I think it depends on your behaviour. I used to be a windows user for 10 years and got virus only twice. Suppose if you not stupid enough to open files with no icons that have a name like document.doc.exe; last 2 years I stopped using antivirus only had a copy to check suspicious files. I know that LIMEWIRE is full of that crap.
     
  12. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #12
    Viruses for OSX don't exist, only for windows and MS office. Malicious programs that can wreak havoc on your mac can and do exist.

    The architecture of OSX hampers viruses, but if you install an application that has a trojan, you'll be inadvertently install the malware.
     
  13. calderone macrumors 68040

    calderone

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    #13
    To give an example of malicious code, it is easy to place scripts that run on login. Of course, those could do many things. Push your external IP, open ports on your machine, delete system files, delete personal files etc etc.

    Those could be placed in the disc image you used. Unlikely, but possible. To be sure, compare the hash of the disc image with the hash of the official disc.
     
  14. mulo macrumors 68020

    mulo

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    #14
    how do you do that?
     
  15. MisterMe macrumors G4

    MisterMe

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    #15
    You miss a fundamental point. If you install a pirated copy of MacOS X, then you have absolutely no guarantee that you have installed MacOS X. You don't recruit bank officers from the county jail and you don't install install operating systems from unknown sources.
     
  16. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #16
    +1

    Given the incredibly low price of Snow Leopard, its a no brainer to that route.
     
  17. MonkeyET macrumors 6502

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    #17
    What about feeling good that you are purchasing a product, which in turn maintains the going-concern of the said company? Put aside feelings of what and how much profit a company makes. If you don't want it, don't buy it. If you do, the price is stated. The decision is yours. Is the effort in trying to find a way to get a "free" copy worthwhile considering all the additional hunting, fixing, and worrying?
     
  18. snberk103 macrumors 603

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    #18
    Trojans are programs that do bad things that you install yourself. Usually they are either hidden along side other programs, or you install them because you think they do something else entirely. But, you need to install a trojan yourself - so the OS assumes you know what you are doing. You have given your permission to the installation. Viruses and worms try to install themselves without your permission. This is a simplified and generalized explanation.
    There are some good reasons to install an AV. One day someone is going to be successful in writing a virus for OS X. If you have data that is important to you, then an AV might protect you. If you are lucky enough to be exposed to the virus after the AV app has been able to update itself for the new virus you will be able to gloat. If you are exposed before the AV app gets it's signature your data may be toast.

    If you routinely download programs from, um, less than official sites on the web - you are exposing yourself to malware. You could just avoid the few known problem programs.... since it's likely you'll download any new trojans before the AV signatures are updated.

    If you routine accept and send on MS documents. Sometimes a Windows user is infected, sends an infected file to a Mac user - who is not infected, but then sends the infection on to other Windows users. Having an AV in this case is just being a nice person - you can help to mitigate some Windows malware infections by having an AV.
     
  19. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #19
    An antivirus app can't protect you from a virus that doesn't yet exist, because it doesn't know what to look for. Unless a virus definition already exists for that virus in the AV software, it won't detect it. So if you're unlucky enough to be the very first Mac OS X user who encounters a virus in the wild, no AV software will protect you.

    Mac Virus/Malware Info
     
  20. snberk103 macrumors 603

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    #20
    Originally Posted by snberk103
    There are some good reasons to install an AV. One day someone is going to be successful in writing a virus for OS X. If you have data that is important to you, then an AV might protect you.

    Actually, if you read the very next sentence I wrote you will see that I said that..... although in a more round-about way, admittedly. :)
     

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