Question on First Gen. MBP Fan

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Casey01, Nov 8, 2011.

  1. Casey01 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    #1
    Does the first generation MacBook Pro (MacBook Pro 1,1 Model A1260) have sealed bearing fans. The reason I ask this is because my left fan started making a strange noise last Sunday. I just replaced the fans about 2 months ago, so they can't be wearing down and breaking just yet.

    I've been told putting sewing machine oil in there were lessen the noise.

    Here's a video of what I'm talking about.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hh6SEQ98pmg
     
  2. Queen6 macrumors 603

    Queen6

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2008
    Location:
    Enjoying Better Things
    #2
    I have a 2008 4.1 MBP; I also use SMC fan control, set the fans to max (6K) and then suck out the dust with a vacuum cleaner from the exhaust. I do this once a year or when the fans start making noise, the MBP is on 24/7 only restarted for OS X updates. So far I have never had to replace either of the fans.

    My right fan was making exactly the same noise recently, with reduced RPM, positive pressure from the vacuum will help to dislodge any dust/debris, max RPM and suction will pull it out. Don't be tempted to use compressed air, the PSI is far too high and will break the fragile fan blades. My MBP has seen a couple of years or so in the Middle East and now the Tropics, so dust & humidity have and are an issue. Last time I cleaned it a ton of dust from Qatar was sucked out, not only less noise the machine now runs cooler, as I guess the heat-sync`s were also chocked with dust.
     
  3. Casey01 thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    #3
    I thought using a vacuum would cause static electricity to build up.

    Also I'm afraid to rev it up that high. I feel like it would cause more problems. (I'm not saying that because of the sound, that's just how I feel)

    Speaking of the sound. As of right now it is either non-existent or barely audible.

    MacBooks, they're bipolar I tell ya.
     
  4. Queen6, Nov 9, 2011
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2011

    Queen6 macrumors 603

    Queen6

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2008
    Location:
    Enjoying Better Things
    #4
    The fans will be fine they are designed to run at these speeds, and you only need to use the max RPM while you are cleaning. Many have tried "tinned air" only to find that the pressure is too high and it breaks the fragile fan blades. A house hold vacuum doesn't generate such force.

    If the fans noise is inaudible, just leave well alone, if you move the machine and it comes back you know you have something floating around inside. Cleaning out the dust also helps keeping the temp down, ambient temperature is always in the high-side here in the tropics and these older machines can get toasty. As my 4.1 MBP is on 24/7 I frequently run the fans up to max, as it should help to stop the build up of dust, so far it has worked for me as I have never had to open up the MBP to clean it, or replace the fans.

    Realistically the fans are designed to out last the life of the system, unfortunately, dust, hair and whatever else tends to interfere. oh and steer clear of the oil as mixed with dust = grinding paste :)
     
  5. MagicBoy macrumors 68040

    MagicBoy

    Joined:
    May 28, 2006
    Location:
    Manchester, UK
    #5
    Both fans failed on my 2006 MBP 1,1.

    The right one was replaced under warranty by an Apple tech when the logic board was changed as it was squeaking, the left outright failed at about 4 years old which I replaced with a used part from eBay. It will run OK on one fan which it ran at 3500+rpm to keep the temps under control.

    Unfortunately when I checked new fans were not cheap - around £40.
     

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