Question to owners of iMacs

Discussion in 'iMac' started by Trusteft, Jun 5, 2017.

  1. Trusteft macrumors 6502

    Trusteft

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2014
    #1
    without a user replaceable hdd/ssd.
    What happens when something goes wrong and you either need to replace the drive or send the computer for repairs, if it is even under warranty at that point. What happens with all the files you have on the drive which you might not want to risk sharing with others. Be it financial, personal, whatever.

    As I see it there is only one solution, never repair the computer, destroy it when it goes bad. Or am I missing something?

    Yes you can have all those files on an external drive, but some times something might have been left behind or whatever.
     
  2. redheeler macrumors 603

    redheeler

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2014
    #2
    Simply turn on FileVault encryption and stop worrying.
     
  3. keysofanxiety macrumors 604

    keysofanxiety

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2011
    #3
    It's always been the same with iMacs though. Since 1998 the HDD is not deemed to be user replaceable or upgradable.

    Sure, it's fluctuated between how easy it is. But this isn't a new problem. If the drive fails, you need to replace the drive or sell/dispose of the machine.
     
  4. dwig macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2015
    Location:
    Key West FL
    #4
    The "safety" issue is the same with tablets and phones. Disk encryption is one good answer.

    With iMacs, cloning the HD/SSD to an external drive on a regular basis gives you another alternative. If the internal fails you can boot from the clone drive. If that clone is a TB drive, performance will generally be quite decent for most uses.
     
  5. Trusteft thread starter macrumors 6502

    Trusteft

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2014
    #5
    So this way even if someone removes the drive, they can't access it? What if they use other type of computer?

    My issue is not how to replace the drive (although that's an issue on itself), but how to be certain if I send the computer for repairs that some technician won't just copy/use my files.

    I have a tablet, if it goes down and I have any important files on its memory (ie not on the sd card) then I will simply get rid of the tablet, ie destroy it. Its cost isn't worth the trouble.
    Phone, I don't care, I don't keep important/business files on it.

    As I mentioned, backing up files is not the issue. Blocking access to the drive I can't replace is.
    If I have to choose between not sending the system for repairs in case a third party gains access to the files, and sending it knowing that they won't be able to, that's what matters.
     
  6. BrianBaughn macrumors 601

    BrianBaughn

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2011
    Location:
    Baltimore, Maryland
    #6
    Now that you know about FileVault I suggest you research it yourself. That's the way I usually proceed.

    Alternately, you can ask the same question here again and wait for fragmented answers from people you don't know!
     
  7. redheeler macrumors 603

    redheeler

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2014
    #7
    Someone would need your password to decrypt and read the contents of the drive no matter what computer they put it in. That's how FileVault (and most other drive encryption software) works.
     
  8. zone23 macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    May 10, 2012
    #8
    Does FileVault slow down the machine at all? Also if the SSD is soldered to the motherboard I wouldn't think you have to worry too much about someone removing it and reading the contents.
     
  9. Trusteft thread starter macrumors 6502

    Trusteft

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2014
    #9
    Or perhaps someone will answer and not provide an answer.
    --- Post Merged, Jun 9, 2017 ---
    Thank you very much.

    Also thank you to those who tried to help.
    --- Post Merged, Jun 9, 2017 ---
    A quick look at wiki says something about 20-30% slow down which seems a lot. Too much actually. Either that's wrong or I misunderstood.
     
  10. CWallace macrumors 603

    CWallace

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    #10
    The initial encryption process will impact drive performance, but once that is done, the overhead should be pretty minimal.
     
  11. MichaelDT macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2012
    #11
    When did they start soldering iMac SSDs to the lobo, I believe they are slotted blades.
     
  12. zone23 macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    May 10, 2012
    #12
    Probably, I was actually thinking about the MacBooks when I typed that.. my bad.
     

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