Questions about Apple Card

mavericks7913

Suspended
Original poster
May 17, 2014
812
281
1. Do they provide a physical form of Apple card?

2. Am I able to use Apple Card WITHOUT my bank account like Citibank? Or will it be better to drop my Citibank instead of Apple Card?

3. Any disadvantages compared to Citi bank?
 

timeconsumer

macrumors 68000
Aug 1, 2008
1,773
1,476
Portland
1. Do they provide a physical form of Apple card?

2. Am I able to use Apple Card WITHOUT my bank account like Citibank? Or will it be better to drop my Citibank instead of Apple Card?

3. Any disadvantages compared to Citi bank?
1. Yes, you'll get a physical card for when you can't use Apple Pay.
2. It's a credit card so you don't need a bank account. However, you'll want to have a bank account so you can make online payments to the card.
3. The Apple Card is a credit card, not a bank account. If you're looking for a comparable cash back credit card from Citi, check out the Citi Double Cash card.
 

coldwaves

macrumors 6502
May 30, 2011
359
151
1. Do they provide a physical form of Apple card?

2. Am I able to use Apple Card WITHOUT my bank account like Citibank? Or will it be better to drop my Citibank instead of Apple Card?

3. Any disadvantages compared to Citi bank?
1) Yes, Apple will give you a physical card. You can use it in places where Apple Pay is not available. However, the card has no numbers printed on it. So if you need to use the card for online purchase, you have to look for that number in your phone. The card information is stored in your wallet app.

2. Apple Card is just a credit card. You can use it the same way as other credit card.

3. It is 3% cash back for Apple purchase, 2% for purchase made for Apple Pay, and 1% for everything else. Citi has a double cash that is 2% for everything. In terms of cash back, Citi Double Cash probably has advantage (unless you buy a lot from Apple). But Apple card may have some security benefits and better integration with your Phone. Well, you don't have to have just one card. You can have both if you want.
 
  • Like
Reactions: timeconsumer

now i see it

macrumors 603
Jan 2, 2002
5,342
10,795
The "huge" disadvantage of the physical Card is that the card number ISNT printed on the card. Nor is the expiration date or cv code.

While this may possibly enhance security, it requires you to either memorize all that information or ALWAYS have your iPhone with you when needing to make a credit card purchase that requires entering the cc info.

The beauty of a plastic normal traditional credit card is that you don't need to carry anything else with you. All you need is the card. With the Card, that's not guaranteed.
If someone were to only get one credit card, the Card (IMO) would be a poor choice. It seems more like a major liability to me, locking a credit card to your iPhone .

Apple is spending billions of dollars trying to diversify away from being as dependent on iPhone sales as they've been by starting all these new services. They're attempting to do that at OUR expense by trying to monopolize everything in our digital life.

If people were smart, they'd follow Apple's example and diversify AWAY from Apple services. Don't be their patsy.
 
Last edited:

noobinator

macrumors 604
Jun 19, 2009
6,613
5,725
Pasadena, CA
The "huge" disadvantage of the physical Card is that the card number ISNT printed on the card. Nor is the expiration date or cv code.

While this may possibly enhance security, it requires you to either memorize all that information or ALWAYS have your iPhone with you when needing to make a credit card purchase over the phone.

The beauty of a plastic normal traditional credit card is that you don't need to carry anything else with you. All you need is the card. With the Card, that's not guaranteed.
If someone were to only get one credit card, the Card (IMO) would be a poor choice.
How many people make credit card purchases over the phone in 2019? I haven’t done this in probably more than a decade.
 
  • Like
Reactions: javen and rugmankc

ftaok

macrumors 603
Jan 23, 2002
6,201
1,221
East Coast
Keeping Citibank means both debit card and bank account.
Do you understand the difference between a credit card and a debit card? The Apple Card is a credit card.

You would only need to "keep your Citibank" of you need a debit card and a bank account.

You're question is too open ended and probably unique to your own personal situation. Only you can answer that question for yourself.
 
  • Like
Reactions: TheAppleFairy

Chundles

macrumors G4
Jul 4, 2005
11,978
422
Credit Cards and Bank Accounts are different.

Credit Cards: buy things and pay later.
Bank Accounts: Provide debit cards to buy things and pay now, also storing money you earn.

You don’t need a bank account to have a credit card however you can’t have your salary paid into a credit card or save money for retirement etc.
 

parseckadet

macrumors 65816
Dec 13, 2010
1,143
665
Denver, CO
The "huge" disadvantage of the physical Card is that the card number ISNT printed on the card. Nor is the expiration date or cv code.

While this may possibly enhance security, it requires you to either memorize all that information or ALWAYS have your iPhone with you when needing to make a credit card purchase that requires entering the cc info.
How is this not true for any other credit card? Just replace the word "iPhone" with the word "wallet." Honestly, when I'm buying something online, which is the only time I need those details, I'm far more likely to have my phone nearby than my wallet with the credit card in it.
How many people make credit card purchases over the phone in 2019? I haven’t done this in probably more than a decade.
Over the phone, more often than you would imagine. I end up having to give that information to doctor and dentist offices fairly regularly. But I use it far more often when buying something online. Just about every website wants that info. The only ones that don't are those that support ApplePay online, which are few and far between.
 
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.