Questions about France (Studying/Living)

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by it5five, Jul 5, 2007.

  1. it5five macrumors 65816

    it5five

    Joined:
    May 31, 2006
    Location:
    New York
    #1
    I plan on studying/living in France after I get my bachelors degree in the US, and I have a few questions.

    The French have a Licence/Maîtrise/Doctorat system, and it appears that it is similar to the Bachelors/Masters/Doctorate system in the US, but I just want to know if a Licence is the French equivalent to to the Bachelors, or if I will have to do some extra studies before I can move onto the Maîtrise.

    Also, if I study at a normal French university, such as the Sorbonne in Paris, can I expect to pay as much as a normal French student (which is almost nothing), or would I be expected to pay more since I am a foreign student?

    And, last question, is it difficult to immigrate and eventually become a citizen of France? I know nobody on here is an immigration expert, but will it be easier if I have (hopefully) been studying and obtaining degrees in France for quite a few years? If anyone on here has been a US citizen and moved to France, any advice would be great.

    Thanks.
     
  2. R.Youden macrumors 68020

    R.Youden

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2005
    #2
    One word of warning: It is full of French people.....]

    Only joking. I think you are right in your assessment of the French academic structure. If you get a top degree / PhD from any university or country then it will be very well respected so I wouldn't worry about that too much.

    Not sure about the immigration system though. I am sure the French government has a website somewhere.
     
  3. jng macrumors 65816

    jng

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2007
    Location:
    Germany
    #3
    No to the first and hell yes to the second? One of my best friends lives in Paris now and short of marrying a Frenchman, hard to get a work visa and citizenship.

    You'd also have to bette define immigrate actually. To obtain permanent residency varies from country to country and I'm sure it'd be easily to get a visa to get your education, after which you'd be stuck on a tourist visa. In terms of just getting into the country, pretty easy though.
     
  4. it5five thread starter macrumors 65816

    it5five

    Joined:
    May 31, 2006
    Location:
    New York
    #4
    I have researched the whole student visa thing, and it seems pretty easy. I just need to get into a university in France. It is incredibly easy for French students to get into universities there (high school diploma is only requirement), and it seems almost as easy for foreigners. If I do get in, I also pay exactly what the French students do, which is close to nothing.

    After I am done with school there, I can take a job with a French company, and turn my student visa into a long-term work visa. Then get a visa that allows me to stay for 10 years. Then, after all of that, I can apply for citizenship.

    It appears that the easiest way to become French is to get in with a student visa, because you can work with your student visa (though only 19.5 hours during school and full time, 35 hours, when school is out).
     
  5. jng macrumors 65816

    jng

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2007
    Location:
    Germany
    #5
    Don't underestimate that. Check with specific Universities what their requirements are for foreigners. And American does have the best universities so if you want to study in France, you better study at the best schools, for example, Sciences Po in Paris.

    French labor laws are really strict. It's very difficult to fire people so firms hire for the really long term, which means they're very selective in hiring. You have to be rather specialized to increase your chances of finding a jobt here, because the French are ahead of you in the job line, as are other EU citizens, including Germans, etc.

    You don't really "become" French with a student visa. You can go there, yes. A friend of mine tried getting a part time job while in school. No luck because a native Frenchman's french is always better than his and also because of labor laws (hire the french first, foreigners afterward).

    Don't expect to be able to find income yearround, esp. at first.

    Not trying to discourage you, just trying to point out potential (and probable) difficulties you'll face.
     
  6. it5five thread starter macrumors 65816

    it5five

    Joined:
    May 31, 2006
    Location:
    New York
    #6
    I know. I meant that it seemed like the easiest way to get my foot in the door is with the student visa. It takes forever to actually become a citizen.

    It'll be hard, but it is a few years down the road, so I should have enough savings by then to cover me through the difficult times.
     

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