Questions for Web Designers?

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by 76ShovelHead, Jul 18, 2010.

  1. 76ShovelHead macrumors 6502a

    76ShovelHead

    Joined:
    May 30, 2010
    Location:
    Florida
    #1
    I am Web Design student, and being taught to Design websites with Dreamweaver, creating tables. More and more i read that using Dreamweaver, being a WYSIWYG editor, how its unprofessional, mediocre and a turn off to potential clients, and that more and more fellow Web Designers "look down" on ones who use such programs instead of raw code. I create really nice, graphically pleasing Intranet pages in my home, but am i going about being a web designer all wrong? I do use a mixture of Coda and PageSpinner for quickly editing the date an text, But my whole "Building" and "Designing" is based off Fireworks graphics/buttons and Dreamweaver tables. What do you use? is my "Idea" of Web Designing an Illusion? I appreciate your feedback:(
     
  2. Eric-PTEK macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2009
    #2
    IMO, bull.

    Your customers have no idea how a web site works, to them its all fairy dust and magic.

    You sell a product, an end result which meets their needs. So long as the route your take to design the product does not hinder their future needs and long term vision then who cares if you write the code on toilet paper.

    We sell a vision, and end result, if someone cares how I get there then most likely they will turn out to be the customer from hell. They are hiring someone else because they are not the expert, you will be the expert, if they tell you how to do your job then time to find a new customer.

    We do web and application development. Mostly the app side, yes we do graphical web pages but not in house. Our designer uses Photoshop/Fireworks, etc and I'll put those designs up against anyone. It is the person doing the work, not the tools used to get there.
     
  3. kasakka macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2008
    #3
    The problem with most WYSIWYG editors is that they don't churn out very neat code, though they are getting better. There's nothing wrong with using them, as long as you also know how to do the same things by hand with nothing but a text editor. I guess the "looking down" part comes from seeing people who only use WYSIWYG editors claim to be professional web designers yet they don't know the languages they're working in properly.

    I prefer working with Textmate since it has many features that make it easier to write code or markup.
     
  4. snickelfritz macrumors 65816

    snickelfritz

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2003
    Location:
    Tucson AZ
    #4
    DreamWeaver CS5 puts out some pretty clean code.
    Most hand-coders would be doing well to match it.

    Personally, if a client tried to tell me what tools (or technologies) to use, I'd show them the door.
    There is nothing more irritating than a would-be-know-it-all ignoramus.
     
  5. 76ShovelHead thread starter macrumors 6502a

    76ShovelHead

    Joined:
    May 30, 2010
    Location:
    Florida
    #5
    thanks

    thanks for all your replies about this. I guess i'm not doing it bad, but should still learn the codes.
     
  6. THX1139 macrumors 68000

    THX1139

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2006
    #6
    I make my living doing web development and my primary tool of choice is Dreamweaver. What you use to create your site is not as important as it's functionality and design. Sure, you can't use iWeb for professional results... but Dreamweaver CS4 and 5 are professional products that work very well. Don't let anybody tell you otherwise.

    And it's not always about WYSIWYG interface. I use Dreamweaver because I can knock out a website fast when needed. I do a lot of freelance work where other designers hand off page design templates to code. Then their client sends the written content and I have to put together a 60-100 page website in a few days. I wouldn't want to do that by hand. Using a CMS would be better, but often the client doesn't want that or can't afford it. Dreamweaver also works well for maintenance. I can launch Dreamweaver, update and upload a page in just a few minutes. Again, coding by hand would kind of suck. Time is money!

    Use the tools you need to complete the job and don't worry what about what others think unless your work is crap.

    If I needed to hire someone and had the choice between two people - one who codes by hand, and the other who knows Dreamweaver really well - who do you think I would hire? That's easy... the Dreamweaver guy. Why? Because clients don't care about pretty code from a purist point of view. They just want their website yesterday and Dreamweaver will get you that result quicker. Sure you need to know the technology and be able to work in code view, but to rely strictly on hand coding is ridiculous nowadays. Most professionals use a combination of a WYSIWYG type application, a bit of hand coding, and maybe a script editor. I've worked freelance at a lot of studios that were doing major development and none of them were coding strictly by hand. There simply isn't enough time to work that way.

    You can't do or fix what you can't understand. You don't have to write it by hand, but if it's not working, you need to be able to see the code and know what it's doing. Coding by hand is a great way to learn, but once you know what your doing, take time to learn a faster way. Unless it's just going to be a hobby.
     
  7. cyberdesignz macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 16, 2010
    #7
    When i was the Beginner, I don't like codes but quickly i came to know what are the Importance of Learning Code - I suggest you that If you have poor Coding then try to Learn them first - Its really helpful to You & With professional coding you can able to Establish Creative Website Designing - :)
     
  8. Yamcha macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2008
    #8
    I'm sort of the same position you are, I'm much more skilled and have more experience with photoshop and illustrator then coding. But I think its really important to be able to learn how to code XHTML/CSS, and one of the many reasons is you learn to understand the limits of coding..

    I'm actually have some basic knowledge of coding, not enough to code any of my works, but I do plan on learning it, and I think all designers should..
     
  9. 76ShovelHead thread starter macrumors 6502a

    76ShovelHead

    Joined:
    May 30, 2010
    Location:
    Florida
    #9
    Yea. Im Definitely stronger in a WYSIWYG application, but occasionally, i will use a quick editor like coda or page spinner to update content like the date, update links, reroute buttons to different pages. Ultimately i was afraid that if i didn't know how to code a whole website then i won't be a "professional" but as one of the posters stated that clients don't care about code - they hire professionals because they aren't, and as long as it looks good. Cant hurt to learn it though, and i wouldn't mind it seems interesting. I haven't tried Dreamweaver CS5 yet, as my hard drive for my PC is back at seagate and Im awaiting my replacement for the second time this month, Im stuck use Nvu instead. Thanks for all the replies i appreciate the support.
     

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