quick question about the Mac Pro

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by slakjaw, Aug 20, 2012.

  1. slakjaw macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2012
    #1
    Hello,

    I switched to Apple back in 2010 and I got a macbook pro. I edit photos in Lightroom and Photoshop and it has been a great tool for this. I felt it was plenty fast with the 12 Mpix files from my D700 and D300 cameras. However, when working with the huge files coming out of the Nikon D800 the performance is pretty poor.

    I don't know much about the Mac Pro but I was thinking about getting one just because it is upgradeable... Do you guys think the current Mac Pro is something I could use for the next 3 or 4 years? The new Macbook pro's are nice but not that much less money for something that might not last as long?

    I apologize if this is a dumb question I don't know very much about computer hardware. Appreciate any replies. Thanks.
     
  2. derbothaus macrumors 601

    derbothaus

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2010
    #2
    Maybe try adding more Memory (RAM) to your current Mac. You can at least get 8GB in there. If you are at 8 maybe try 16GB. If that does not help you would then need to look at desktops that can support more (32GB/64GB) of memory. Large photos generally are memory starved more than anything else.
     
  3. LeandrodaFL macrumors 6502a

    LeandrodaFL

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2011
    #3
    The current MacPro is kind the one you have. Wait till early next year, as according to Tim cook, Apple wil release a fully refresehd line of MacPros.
     
  4. avemestr macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2012
    #4
    Where do "early" in "early next year" come from?
     
  5. PowerPCMacMan macrumors 6502a

    PowerPCMacMan

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2012
    Location:
    PowerPC land
    #5
    Quarter 1 or Quarter 2 of 2013. That is a rough guess, but really we don't know when.

     
  6. avemestr macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2012
    #6
    Tim Cook wrote (if we take the quote at face value): "Although we didn’t have a chance to talk about a new Mac Pro at today’s event, don’t worry as we’re working on something really great for later next year."

    If refreshing in Q1 or Q2, people will moan about Haswell being "right about the corner". On the other hand, if Apple waits until Haswell is actually ready, it might be 2014 before we see a refresh...

    So perhaps Q1 or Q2 is the best guesstimate at the moment. That would silence (some) of the Haswell-crowd. But then again, a Q1 or Q2 launch would spec-wise only be catching up with the competitors. IF we see a new MP in first half next year it'll have to be "new" in some way, as Apple seldom likes playing catch-up.
     
  7. Yebubbleman macrumors 68030

    Yebubbleman

    Joined:
    May 20, 2010
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    #7
    Mac Pro towers are fairly upgradable, though they are seriously behind current tech. My advice is that if you are considering one, consider getting this:

    http://store.apple.com/us/product/FC560LL/A

    It's actually very appropriately (and reasonably) priced given the age of the components inside. As for your MacBook Pro situation, if you bought a 2010 model, then you shouldn't need an upgrade to the 2012 models quite yet. You would see performance gains, but they are not worth it unless you sold your 2010 model.
     
  8. Melbourne Park macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2012
    #8
    Yes, the price of it is not too far north of Hacktintoshes, plus its easily upgradeable. Including putting in a 6 core Xeon CPU, which on multi-threading apps like Lightroom, will gain you another 50% in performance. RAM can go to 32GB without too much cost. The 16 memory cards cost more again though. Check the cost of memory ... but it will run 64GB (the single CPU has 4 RAM card slots).

    Downsides are lack of USB-3 (which can be added via a card), and no thunderbolt.

    If one looks at the cost of good monitors, the cost of the Mac Pro is right now relatively cheap, considering its long life.

    I bought the twin CPU model, which is slower unless one's app multi-threads.
     

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