Quick UV filter question.

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by MichaelBarry, Jun 25, 2009.

  1. MichaelBarry macrumors member

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    #1
    Does a UV filter reduce the amount of light going to the sensor i.e will I get a slower shutter speed?

    I was thinking of buying one, just to have constantly on my lens as protection.

    How about this one?

    Hoya UV standard filter

    (on a very low budget). :)
     
  2. Phrasikleia macrumors 601

    Phrasikleia

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    #2
  3. MichaelBarry thread starter macrumors member

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    #3
    THANKS! I'll definitely invest more after seeing that. didn't really think it made a significant difference.
     
  4. MichaelBarry thread starter macrumors member

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    #4
    although the description says that the filter is coated on both sides? is the filter still bad or is this just a really good deal?

    Hoya 55mm Standard UV Filter
     
  5. Phrasikleia macrumors 601

    Phrasikleia

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    #5
    The feature to look for is "multicoated." Hoya's abbreviation for these filters is HMC.
     
  6. Westside guy macrumors 601

    Westside guy

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    #6
    I think buying cheap UV filters for protection just degrades your photos. If you really feel the protection is necessary, spend the money and get a good filter.

    Personally I stopped putting protective filters on my lenses. They mainly (in my opinion) just protect the lens from small scratches, which wouldn't degrade the image quality anyway. But I know some people feel very strongly the opposite way.
     
  7. toxic macrumors 68000

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    #7
    it's possible, but i doubt it will be enough to reduce shutter speed.

    every piece of glass (and air molecule, for that matter) between the subject and the sensor reduces light. this was a problem a few decades ago when making zoom lenses - zooms require more glass than primes, and there would be too much light loss as a result. now we use multicoated glass, so it's no longer a problem.

    i believe there should be charts showing the light loss of different UV filters (at least within the same manufacturer). i think the best filters let in 99%+ of the light. uncoated ones will allow much less.
     
  8. Doylem macrumors 68040

    Doylem

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    #8
    Whenever I buy a lens (and it's not very often... :(), I buy a skylight filter too (reasonable quality...). It's mostly to give me peace of mind, so I won't be worrying about damaging my lens. And, IMO, an unworried photographer takes better pictures... :)
     
  9. joro macrumors 68020

    joro

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    #9
    Agreed. When I bought all my new L Lenses, I went ahead and capped them off with Hoya UV Filters just to protect the glass. I'd rather scratch a $40 filter than a $1,500 lens! :D
     
  10. jampat macrumors 6502a

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    #10
    What do you need protection from? A filter provides limited protection in a fall, it mainly keeps junk off the front lens element and can (in some cases) slightly increase the weather resistance of some lenses.

    When shooting concerts I use a filter as tons of water/sweat come flying off stage and I would rather not be wiping down the lens every hour. When taking shots in a controlled environment, there is no need for a filter.
     
  11. Doylem macrumors 68040

    Doylem

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    #11
    True enough. And if I ever shoot in a controlled environment, I'll let you know... ;)
     
  12. jbernie macrumors 6502a

    jbernie

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    #12
    Even in a controlled environment I wouldn't necessarily avoid one, so you may not have small pebbles flying at your lens, but it isn't impossible to get a scratch.

    I have a scratch on one lens of my driving glasses, no idea how it got there as nothing hit them... no playing football.. not crazy antics... just my normal average life... $160 later to replace the lenses.....
     
  13. MichaelBarry thread starter macrumors member

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    #13
    brought a Hoya HMC UV filter last night so the decision has been made. :)

    also brought a minolta 50mm 1.7 last night too so need one for that too haha.
     
  14. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #14
    I have always had a good UV lens on my cameras; I agree with both Doylem and jrotunda85 - a good lens can be very expensive and it makes sense to protect it from scratches, and falls (as I can attest from personal experience).

    Cheers and good luck
     
  15. cutsman macrumors regular

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    Jun 1, 2006
    #15
    For me, I always shoot with the lens hood as protection. This has been sufficient for me... so far... ;)
     
  16. telecomm macrumors 65816

    telecomm

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    #16
    I always shoot with the lens cap on. Unbeatable protection. :D
     
  17. LittleCanonKid macrumors 6502

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    #17
    I personally always shoot with the camera and lens in an empty, dust-less room! Works like a charm! :D
     
  18. HBOC macrumors 68020

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    #18
    i used to use one, but only when i am shooting at the beach or something, but even then i am probably using a split grad anyways.

    Lens are coated from the factory. And most of the time, i have some sort of filter on the lens, as most of my shooting is nature/landscape/waterfalls..
     
  19. telecomm macrumors 65816

    telecomm

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    #19
    Hey... not a bad idea! You're probably getting better exposures than I am.

    Seriously, though, scratches and dust are not as big a deal as people might think.

    Skeptical? Check out this (posted in another thread here a little while back).
     
  20. MichaelBarry thread starter macrumors member

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    #20
    WOW! :D:p
     

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