RAID 0+1 - Looks ok?

Discussion in 'macOS' started by island, Jan 20, 2008.

  1. island macrumors 6502

    island

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2007
    Location:
    CT
    #1
    Let me know if this looks correct for a 0 + 1 setup RAID.

    ;)
     

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  2. Makosuke macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2001
    Location:
    The Cool Part of CA, USA
    #2
    That does look correct to me, although it looks like you're going to be booting off of that? Not sure what your setup or needs are, but seems like you'd do better to have a separate drive for the OS.
     
  3. island thread starter macrumors 6502

    island

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2007
    Location:
    CT
    #3
    Why wouldn't you want your boot volume to be the one that is RAID 0+1? I don't do video editing but I do want the fastest performance out of the 4 drives I have.

    Thanks for your comments so far.
     
  4. yg17 macrumors G5

    yg17

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2004
    Location:
    St. Louis, MO
    #4

    If something in the OS gets hosed, it's easier to do a clean install if all your data is on a second drive (or partition).
     
  5. Makosuke macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2001
    Location:
    The Cool Part of CA, USA
    #5
    (Little late clarifying my own opinion, but...)

    In addition to the ease of installs/updates/troubleshooting (no way to just pull out the boot drive to test something), there's also that it's sort of a waste of speed.

    Generally a RAID0 setup isn't going to make all that much difference on the sort of disk performance that affects OS loading and operations, and application loads. Where RAID0 excels is raw throughput, for things like video capture.

    Further, if you put your boot disk on the same disk/disk set you're using for your data needs, you're going to be increasing the likelihood of fragmentation and needlessly slowing down whatever operations you want maximum speed for, since the drives will have to seek to do OS operations in the middle of whatever large transfer is going on.

    Thus, it generally makes way more sense to have your data volume be the one with RAID0 and just have a nice speedy single drive (Raptor, for example) for the OS partition, or RAID1 set if you really want the uptime.

    If you want some numbers, have a look at StorageReview's opinions on RAID--their tests are admittedly for Windows, but I expect their conclusion (RAID0 on a boot drive doesn't really get you that much extra speed) would be the same with the MacOS. Linear, large-file transfers (i.e. video capture), is a completely different matter--BareFeats has plenty of benchmarks on that.
     
  6. Wraithe macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2003
    #6
    Actually, that's RAID 10 (1+0)

    What you have set up is correct, but just to keep terms straight, you're setting up a RAID 10 Configuration; a stripe of Mirrors. (RAID 0+1 is a mirror of stripes, if you take my meaning.)

    RAD 10 is actually a pretty decent setup that will allow you to leverage the fast read speeds of your drives, create a single large volume and give you pretty solid chance of keeping a single drive failure from blowing your partition.

    With all respect to the posted who suggested a RAID 0 for a startup volume, make sure you have a good backup, I generally wouldn't recommend RAID 0 for anything other than scratch disks or VM storage, but hey, YMMV.
     
  7. Consultant macrumors G5

    Consultant

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    Jun 27, 2007

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