RAID question

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by matteusclement, Apr 9, 2012.

  1. matteusclement macrumors 65816

    matteusclement

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Location:
    victoria
    #1
    It's kind of a PC question, but you are all so smart here I can't help myself.

    I am rebuilding my PC video editing rig and am realizing the headache that I am going to go through with my RAID1 set up.

    The redundancy that I am looking for is just to make sure I have mulitple copies of my captured footage. Could I just do this with software just as easy with out the future worries of moving computers?
    if so, what would I use?
     
  2. Keebler macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2005
    Location:
    Canada
    #2
    Hi Matt,

    I would say that depends on what type of footage you have- client footage for your own footage? Is it something you'll be keeping long-term or just to back up while you're working on a client project?

    Also a RAID can be set up for different purposes. I have a RAID set up inside my Mac Pro for work projects. It's set up for both redundancy and to boost the performance of the hard drives slightly. I can't remember what RAID number that is however. Lol It's 2 x 1 TB drives so it still shows up as 1 TB

    I have an external array set up with 4×2 TB drives. It's set up as a raid +10 (so it shows up as 4 TB instead of 8 TB). This set up is purely for my own home videos and photographs and other documents. Just for giggles I back this up on to another Raid.

    Personally, if this is work related, it would depend on the type of media I'm using. If it's tape media, you can always recapture a tape. If it's digital files from an SD card or clients camera, you can always transfer the files back over to hard drive if you suffer crash. That said it's also important to backup your project files as you go along just in case you suffer a crash, your progress is saved.

    Cheers
    Keebler
     
  3. luke.mac1 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    #3
    I wasn't aware you could boost performance and have redundancy... unless you have a third drive.

    Raid 0 would boost speed, have no redundancy and show up as 2TB. Raid 1 would have redundancy, wouldn't boost speed and would show up as 1TB. I'm not aware of any other raid levels that use less than 3 drives.
     
  4. matteusclement thread starter macrumors 65816

    matteusclement

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Location:
    victoria
    #4
    you're right. raid 10 needs 4 drives and then you get all of the above.
     
  5. luke.mac1 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    #5
    I would say that a drobo is pretty much the easiest thing ever for this stuff. You can even get one with e-sata... they're expensive though and I'm not sure whether they would actually be fast enough for your needs.
    I love mine though :) It saved an awful lot of configuration and hassle.
     
  6. matteusclement thread starter macrumors 65816

    matteusclement

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Location:
    victoria
    #6
    I just need back up. I won't run anything from it.
     
  7. MaynardJames macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2008
    #7
    RAID 1 mirrors data between drives. So, if you have two drives in a RAID 1 setup, then all of the data is written to both of those drives. This gives a read performance boost, as data can be read from both drives simultaneously. This is of course, assuming your implementation supports multiple read/writes.
     
  8. luke.mac1 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    #8
    Really?? If I had known that I would've used it back in the days when I was using striping... maybe I wouldn't have lost all of my data! Ah...to be naïve about backing up! I won't make that mistake again. I've had everything backed up for almost 10years now. :D
     

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