Raise to wake too sensitive?

KimHansenDK

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Original poster
Jul 29, 2011
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I have noticed that my new Apple Watch Series 2 is waking up the screen at the slightest movement of my wrist. The Apple Watch Series 1 that I had last year did not do this. I would prefer to actually have to raise and turn my wrist in order to wake the screen. It seems too sensitive.

Have anyone experienced this issue? Is it a hardware problem - do I need to exchange it for a new one?
 

Relentless Power

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Jul 12, 2016
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My Apple Watches all react the same when Raise to Wake is activated. They are fairly sensitive with raising the wrist. Your best option is to deactivate it, which you can use tap the screen to activate the display for 15 seconds or 70 seconds.

Your Watch isn't defective. Previous WatchOS updates have increased the sensitivity with Raise to Wake.
 
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KimHansenDK

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Original poster
Jul 29, 2011
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Thanks a lot - I guess I just have to get used to the increased sensitivity ;)
 

Newtons Apple

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Mar 12, 2014
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I have noticed that my new Apple Watch Series 2 is waking up the screen at the slightest movement of my wrist. The Apple Watch Series 1 that I had last year did not do this. I would prefer to actually have to raise and turn my wrist in order to wake the screen. It seems too sensitive.

Have anyone experienced this issue? Is it a hardware problem - do I need to exchange it for a new one?
Common when you get you new watch. Just try to ignore.
 
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BigMcGuire

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Jan 10, 2012
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I'm torn on this... I am a programmer so most of my work day is sitting at my desk. If I have Raise to Wake ON - the watch turns itself on quite frequently as I am a pretty rapid typer. However, if I turn Raise to Wake Off, which has a noticeable effect on battery life, when I do want it when I'm walking, I don't have that. Would be cool to activate Raise to Wake during non-work hours (kinda like DND).

I think it is kinda funny - my wife and I both sleep with our Apple Watches. Whenever we turn or toss - both our watches light up under the covers (or above) - lighting up the room if Raise to Wake is on. (Doesn't bother me, always makes me smile).

The whole point of a watch is to be able to quickly check the time when someone asks or if you need to. I can definitely increase my watch's Battery Life if I have it off but if I'm carrying something with my right hand, I can't check the time.

So I'm leaning to leave it on but getting used to the watch lighting up a ton and using more battery life is going to be a lesson in self control for me. Like above posters, I'd rather have it too sensitive so when I want it, it always works.
 

big samm

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Oct 27, 2008
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I never use that feature, i just tap once on the screen and that’s it! Im sure im saving a ton of battery
 

BigMcGuire

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I never use that feature, i just tap once on the screen and that’s it! Im sure im saving a ton of battery
Yeah I believe I'm doing the same, especially since while I'm at the office for 8-10 hours, the watch isn't constantly lighting up many many times per hour. I am debating whether or not to just live with it because in my tests, even if I have raise to wake on, I'll end the day at 80%+. With it off, (and no workouts), I can end the day at 96%. So a loss of 10% or less just to have convenience.
 

Lowhangers

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Nov 26, 2017
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I turned raise to wake off on my series 3. I move my arm constantly and I don't like it going on all the time. I get even better battery life with it off too.
 

BigMcGuire

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I tried turning off raise to wake but, there were too many times my right hand was busy and unable to tap to wake so, I turned it back on.
This is where I am. I’ve had it off but too many times I was carrying something and I couldn’t check the time. I changed oil in my car and someone asked me for the time. Nope, I couldn’t. So it’s back on for me. Now if I’m typing for work I’ll turn on theatre mode then turn it off. But leaning more towards what you said.
 

dgreening

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May 12, 2010
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I always had RTW off but decided to try leaving it on. I agree the battery is impacted a little and I really don't like it lighting up everytime I move my wrist. It really bothered me driving last night so I just put it in Theater Mode. It is easier to turn off and on the going into settings and it acts the same way. I put it in Theater mode at night and when I work out. So far it seems to be a good compromise.
 
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Dino F

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Sep 16, 2010
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Now if I’m typing for work I’ll turn on theatre mode then turn it off.
...so what exactly does Theatre mode do that turning off RTW doesn't? Doesn't turning theatre mode, on, stop the screen from lighting up, which is the same as turning RTW, off? What's the difference?

:confused:

I also have to add that RTW is indeed far too sensitive - even on my Series 0 42mm Space grey watch, the slightest movement of my wrist, will light up the screen, even when I don't necessarily raise my arm up.

For instance, with both my wrists resting on the table, with palms downwards in a typing position, if I roll my left wrist (with the watch) to the left slightly so palm is now facing to the right, and then roll it back so palm is downwards again, the screen will light up, even though my arm hasn't been raised.....

I think Apple should have had this feature as an actual raise to wake - so you physically have to raise up your arm to light up the screen and not just move your wrist (which is how it currently works).
 
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BigMcGuire

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...so what exactly does Theatre mode do that turning off RTW doesn't? Doesn't turning theatre mode, on, stop the screen from lighting up, which is the same as turning RTW, off? What's the difference?

:confused:

I also have to add that RTW is indeed far too sensitive - even on my Series 0 42mm Space grey watch, the slightest movement of my wrist, will light up the screen, even when I don't necessarily raise my arm up.

For instance, with both my wrists resting on the table, with palms downwards in a typing position, if I roll my left wrist (with the watch) to the left slightly so palm is now facing to the right, and then roll it back so palm is downwards again, the screen will light up, even though my arm hasn't been raised.....
It allows me to more easily turn RTW back on with a flick up and press vs grabbing my phone and turning RTW back on. So when I want RTW on, I can very quickly turn it back on. So Theatre mode is a temporary block of RTW for me because when I'm exercising or out of the office, I want RTW on but at the office, home, and in bed at night I want it off so I turn on theatre mode.

But yeah, it is very sensitive. That said, when I do want RTW it works every time so I guess that is what it is trying to do.
 
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Dino F

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It allows me to more easily turn RTW back on with a flick up and press vs grabbing my phone and turning RTW back on. So when I want RTW on, I can very quickly turn it back on. So Theatre mode is a temporary block of RTW for me because when I'm exercising or out of the office, I want RTW on but at the office, home, and in bed at night I want it off so I turn on theatre mode.

But yeah, it is very sensitive. That said, when I do want RTW it works every time so I guess that is what it is trying to do.
...doesn't having theatre mode turned on, disable all the notifications though?
 

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