Ram compatibility question.

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by M-B-P, Nov 27, 2014.

  1. M-B-P macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 15, 2010
    #1
    I'm looking to purchase more RAM for a 2009 MBP and a 2010 MBP, upgrading from 2GB and 4GB respectively. The laptops are used primarily for school and watching media, no gaming.


    Will this be compatible:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...-cables-_-na-_-na&Item=N82E16820231704&cm_sp=

    Is this a good purchase in terms of performance?

    And what exactly do I need to look for when checking compatibility?
    The number of pins and anything else?
     
  2. snaky69 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    #2
    Use the crucial memory checker available on their website, they'll give you the full specs you need to properly match those you have. From there, just buy the same thing from whatever brand strikes your fancy.

    With that said, that RAM you posted up is compatible with neither of your machines. The clock speed is too high and it is unlikely to want to downclock itself, it is low voltage which might not work in older models as well.

    Both your 2009 and 2010 MBP's can accept a maximum of 8GB RAM (2X4GB).
     
  3. M-B-P thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 15, 2010
    #3
    Thanks for your response. I attached a screenshot of a compatible stick from Crucial.

    So to clarify I need:

    • 204 Pins
    • 1.35V Voltage
    • 1066 MT/S Speed
    • DDR3
    • PC3-8500

    Any flexibility with those specifications?
    For instance will PC3-12800 be compatible?
     

    Attached Files:

  4. snaky69 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    #4
    Most of the time, you should be able to install memory that is 1 step faster than what is currently in the computer. In theory, the memory should downclock itself to match the logicboard.

    That doesn't always work though. If the place you're buying from has free returns you can give it a try, otherwise I'd stick with what you have.

    RAM speed is all but unnoticeable, so there'd be no real tangible benefit to going higher.
     

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