raspberry pi, getting started

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by mrgreeneyes, Apr 23, 2016.

  1. mrgreeneyes macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2007
    Location:
    Orleans,Canada
    #1
    hey i really would like to purchase a raspberry pi. to have as a media player on my tv.

    where is the best site to buy t online?


    thanks
     
  2. stera8 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2014
    #3
    Yes. I agree that amazon is great. Also check out the website Adafruit. They deal with many different projects regarding the raspberry pi. The Pi 3 just released.
     
  3. JeffyTheQuik macrumors 68020

    JeffyTheQuik

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2014
    Location:
    Charleston, SC and Everett, WA
    #4
    For burning the SD cards, I use Apple Pi-Baker.

    Using DD can be dangerous to any of your Mac's HD, especially if you mistake the of= part. From my QNX days, dd (disk dupe) is a great utility, but it can and will overwrite your HD, and not say "sorry". I'm not sure about whether there's an "are your sure?" in the Mac version, as I don't want to find out, and spend a day restoring my Mac.
     
  4. pastrychef macrumors 601

    pastrychef

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2006
    Location:
    New York City, NY
    #5
    If you have a Micro Center near you, they are selling the Pi 3 for $30. But it's in store only...

    In regards to dd, there's no "are you sure?", but you do need to use sudo.
     
  5. Darth.Titan macrumors 68030

    Darth.Titan

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2007
    Location:
    Austin, TX
  6. rctlr macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    May 9, 2012
    #7
    Raspberry Pis are great.
    I've had mine be a bittorrent sync server, Stunnel Relay, Plex Media Server, and Airplay Service for Audio setup.

    they are very versatile.
     
  7. chrono1081 macrumors 604

    chrono1081

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Location:
    Isla Nublar
    #8
    +1 for Adafruit. They're an awesome small company with lots of tutorials, how to's, and code libraries they created. I use them for all of my Arduino/Raspberry Pi needs.
     
  8. CarlJ macrumors 68020

    CarlJ

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2004
    Location:
    San Diego, CA, USA
    #9
    +2 for Adafruit. Their underlying motive seems to be "it'd be cool if we could make a living helping people learn and make neat things", which closely aligns with that of the Raspberry Pi Foundation itself. They're a one-stop shop for all the things you might need for Raspberry Pi and Arduino (and similar) projects, they have good support forums, they do tutorials on many of the things they sell (especially their own designs, of which there are many), and they have a nice informative youtube channel. Plus LadyAda has pink hair. What's not to like?

    I also strongly suggest poking around the official Raspberry Pi site - https://www.raspberrypi.org - check their blog and forums. Lots of good info to be found therein.

    If you happen to live within driving distance of a MicroCenter, that's pretty much your only chance to get one right away, if you're eager. Failing that, Amazon Prime is good if you're in a hurry. Otherwise I'd go with Adafruit (interestingly, some Adafruit-specific stuff is also available via Prime on Amazon). I have ordered a number of bits from the British suppliers (e.g. PiSupply and ThePiHut), and they get all the good stuff (the Raspberry Pi being an English invention), but shipping from the UK can make you tear your hair out at times.

    FWIW, new hardware from the Pi Foundation tends to appear with absolutely no warning (they're almost better at this than Apple). This morning they released a new 8Mp camera module (an upgrade from the existing 5Mp board). The first I knew of it was a new product announcement email from ThePiHut.

    (Also, "dd" is not "disk dupe" - go look it up on wikipedia if you're curious - and just like most Unix commands, it does precisely what you tell it to do, even if that isn't what you meant - as they say, "it gives you enough rope to shoot yourself in the foot".)
     
  9. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #10

    The name "dd" is actually a really obscure joke and was, I think not intended for duplicating disks, that use came later. The joke makes sense only to people as old as me who can still remember the old IBM mainframe operating system called OS/360. In support of dd not being used at first for disks lok at the two parameters "if=" and "of=" these are input and output FILES. The dd command's purpose was to copy bytes between files while doing some kind of transformation on the bytes and/or block sizing (as on tape) The commands purpose was to translate data from other computers like the IBM360. Then some smart guy figured it would work for making copies of disks or parts of disks and other uses.
     
  10. JeffyTheQuik macrumors 68020

    JeffyTheQuik

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2014
    Location:
    Charleston, SC and Everett, WA
    #11
    Love the "back story" on these commands! For 46 year old operating systems (*NIX), we need to remember where these came from!
     
  11. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #12
    It's worse the just 'dd' being an obscure joke the name "UNIX" is a non-obscure joke. It is a direct reference to another OS called "Multics". Multics was a very complex OS that was way ahead of it's time. The name "unix" was meant to be a jab at the overly complex Multics system.

    Multics did one thing I wish modern OSes would do. They moved the entire file system into virtual memory. (A very advanced and hard to get your head around concept in the 1960's) So conceptually, there was no external storage all the files would appear to be in RAM. There was no need to "read" or "write" data. I wish it was Multics that survived to this day, but Unix took over and it is now (with is variants) the world's #1 OS. It runs on every Mac, Every iPhone and very Android phone. (yes I'm called linux a unix variant)
     

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