Re-calibrating Mini expectations - it's a headless rMBP 13

Discussion in 'Mac mini' started by johngwheeler, Oct 19, 2014.

  1. johngwheeler macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2010
    Location:
    I come from a land down-under...
    #1
    Like many (most?) people here, I was greatly disappointed by the removal of the quad-core i7 option.

    However, after looking through some benchmarks and comparing the prices of various Apple configurations, I've adjusted my expectations of what the Mini is for.

    Instead of seeing it as something close to a 15-inch Retina MacBook Pro (which it almost was, bar the graphics), if you think of it as screen-less 13-inch rMBP, then it's position and price sort of make more sense.

    The mid or top-level Mini with the optional PCIe SSD (& this is important!), is likely to perform as well as the equivalent rMBP at about $600 less (assuming 2.8GHz i5)

    Once you factored in the keyboard, mouse & a display, assuming you don't already have these, it's about $200-300 less, which is the "saving" you have for not needing a mobile solution.

    Most people are pretty happy with the performance of their mid or high-end rMBP 13, so we'd expect to see the same with the new Mini.

    It should be quite a responsive little machine with enough power to do anything people are using their laptops for, provided it's using an SSD.

    The previous quad-core models represented exceptionally good value for certain tasks (I use mine as a development workstation and VM server), but undoubtedly eroded some of the iMac or Mac Pro market at the lower end.

    It's a pity this good deal has now come to an end, but the current offering isn't awful, just not as good as it used to be.
     
  2. ViktorEvil macrumors member

    ViktorEvil

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2014
    Location:
    England
    #2
    I was disappointed about the lack of Quad core i7 and iris Pro etc but I bought one anyway.

    I needed a Mac mini to connect to my Thunderbolt Display so I got the
    2.6Ghz i5
    8GB Ram
    1TB fusion drive.

    It's not ideal I know but I think it will last me 2 years or so whilst I save up for a MacPro or Retina iMac.

    I'm only using it for xcode, browsing and email etc. It will then go on to replace the ageing C2Duo Mac mini I use as a HTPC connected to my TV.

    I think this 2014 version is just a stop gap until next year (broadwell or skylake).
     
  3. bounou macrumors 6502

    bounou

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2012
    #3
    Seems like we are exactly in the same boat, got the same mini as you for the same reasons, will probably get a Mac Pro when they release the Haswell processors.

    Mine shipped today and should get it thursday, same time as the iPad.
     
  4. ViktorEvil macrumors member

    ViktorEvil

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2014
    Location:
    England
    #4
    Are you in the UK?
    I've not had shipping confirmation yet
     
  5. bounou macrumors 6502

    bounou

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2012
    #5
    Canada, just got it this morning, was preparing for shipment most of the weekend and i had shipment notification email this morning when i woke up.
     
  6. ViktorEvil macrumors member

    ViktorEvil

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2014
    Location:
    England
    #6
    Mine says it should be with me between the 24th and 28th October but it's still not shipped yet. I can wait a few days I suppose :)
     
  7. Samuelsan2001 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2013
    #7

    The most sensible post I've seen on here in ages.
     
  8. VTECaddict macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2008
    #8
    Yep, that's essentially what it is now. Shame, since the previous mini was positioned as both an entry level Mac as well as a sort of 'semi-pro' desktop and server that was very capable in the quad core i7 guise, save for raw GPU performance. Now the mini is entry level, and slightly less entry level.

    We'll have to wait and see what the future holds for the mini and if Apple brings back more capable configurations when the next gen Intel chips are available. The soldered RAM is a bad sign though, as they probably won't go back from that.

    It is a curious move by Apple, as I would suspect a good chunk of mini buyers are not looking for entry level, but instead want the Mac mini because it's a headless, fairly capable, and upgradeable desktop Mac. People shopping for entry level these days are more likely to go for laptops and tablets anyway, rather than a desktop solution.
     

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