Reading a PC HD on a Mac

Discussion in 'macOS' started by peter tron, Jun 12, 2013.

  1. peter tron macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2012
    Location:
    wye, ashford, kent, uk
    #1
    hi all,

    i am having a boot loop issue with my pc atm, so i really need to take out the hd and plug it into my mac to transfer important files.

    i have read that this can be done.
    the pc hard drive is ide and internal.
    apparently i can put this into an external ide desktop hd enclosure?
    then i want to plug that into my mac and transfer files directly onto a waiting dvd-r on my mac to burn straight away.
    i don't wish to transfer any files directly onto my mac hd.

    can anyone advise?

    br

    baz
     
  2. hallux macrumors 68020

    hallux

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2012
    #2
    The Mac can read the drive but it won't write to it. If it's an IDE drive (dang that's old!) you can't just use an IDE enclosure for a desktop drive as they're actually a different interface.
     
  3. peter tron, Jun 12, 2013
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2013

    peter tron thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Location:
    wye, ashford, kent, uk
    #3
    no, i won't be wanting to write to the ide pc hd in the enclosure, i just want to transfer files from it.

    can you explain a bit more about the interface issue?
    so can i get a hd enclosure that will be compatible with my internal ide hd?
    how is the ide enclosure a different interface from the internal ide hd, as they're both ide?

    edit:

    actually, it is an maxtor stm3250820as ata

    and that means it is sataII

    will this make things easier, with regards to buying a compatible enclosure for it so i can then read it on my mac?
     
  4. hallux macrumors 68020

    hallux

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2012
    #4
    Actually, ATA is another term for IDE. I saw 2 different results when searching that drive, one is IDE and one is SATA.

    This is a laptop IDE connector
    [​IMG]

    This is a desktop IDE connector
    [​IMG]

    This is a SATA connector (doesn't matter if it's desktop or laptop.
    [​IMG]
     
  5. peter tron thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Feb 7, 2012
    Location:
    wye, ashford, kent, uk
    #5
    cheers for getting back to me!

    i just cracked the case to see.
    there's a sata cable plugged in.
     
  6. peter tron thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #6
    i was talking to someone over at overclockers uk, and they told me that i can't plug a pc hdd into a mac, only to another pc hdd?
     
  7. hallux macrumors 68020

    hallux

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2012
    #7
    Does that person have ANY experience with Macs? I've been here and done this, you can plug any Windows-formatted drive into a Mac but depending on how it is formatted you may only be able to read the data but not modify it. As long as you have the ability to plug the drive in, at the very least you'll be able to read the data.

    Here's a breakdown:
    NTFS - Read only
    FAT32 - Read/write
    FAT 16 Read/write
    ExFAT - Read/write

    Most likely the drive is formatted in NTFS.
     
  8. peter tron thread starter macrumors newbie

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    wye, ashford, kent, uk
    #8
    i was using a 3rd party application on my pc called 'HFSexplorer' which enabled me to view/read the contents of my external terrabyte drive.
    it was formatted to run on my mac, so when i plugged it in to the pc, it wouldn't read, until i downloaded HFSexplorer.
    i couldn't modify/delete/move any of the files on there, but it would let me extract them to the desktop

    when you mentioned (at the very least) the pc HDD will probably be in NTFS so therefore 'read only' on the mac, does that mean (like HFSexplorer on the pc) i will be able to drag files from it onto a waiting DVD-R sitting on the mac desktop?
     
  9. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #9
    This should clear up a lot of questions about drive formats:

    Format A Hard Drive Using Disk Utility (which is in your /Applications/Utilities folder) Choose the appropriate format:

    HFS+ (Hierarchical File System, a.k.a. Mac OS Extended (Journaled) Don't use case-sensitive) NTFS (Windows NT File System)
    • Read/Write NTFS from native Windows.
    • Read only NTFS from native Mac OS X [*]To Read/Write/Format NTFS from Mac OS X, here are some alternatives:
      • For Mac OS X 10.4 or later (32 or 64-bit), install Paragon (approx $20) (Best Choice for Lion)
      • For 32-bit Mac OS X, install NTFS-3G for Mac OS X (free) (does not work in 64-bit mode)
      • For 64-bit Snow Leopard, read this: MacFUSE for 64-bit Snow Leopard
      • Some have reported problems using Tuxera (approx $36).
      • Native NTFS support can be enabled in Snow Leopard and Lion, but is not advisable, due to instability.
    • AirPort Extreme (802.11n) and Time Capsule do not support NTFS
    • Maximum file size: 16 TB
    • Maximum volume size: 256TB
    • You can use this format if you routinely share a drive with multiple Windows systems.
    exFAT (FAT64)
    • Supported in Mac OS X only in 10.6.5 or later.
    • Not all Windows versions support exFAT. See disadvantages.
    • exFAT (Extended File Allocation Table)
    • AirPort Extreme (802.11n) and Time Capsule do not support exFAT
    • Maximum file size: 16 EiB
    • Maximum volume size: 64 ZiB
    • You can use this format if it is supported by all computers with which you intend to share the drive. See "disadvantages" for details.
    FAT32 (File Allocation Table)
    • Read/Write FAT32 from both native Windows and native Mac OS X. [*]Maximum file size: 4GB.
    • Maximum volume size: 2TB
    • You can use this format if you share the drive between Mac OS X and Windows computers and have no files larger than 4GB.
     
  10. old-wiz macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2008
    Location:
    West Suburban Boston Ma
    #10
    I would think your issue is more with physically attaching the drive to a Mac due to the question of the interface ide/sata/etc. Once the Mac recognizes the drive you should have no problems reading from it.

    An external caddy might be a way to go.
     
  11. peter tron thread starter macrumors newbie

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    wye, ashford, kent, uk
    #11
    yep, it's definitely SATA.
    so an external caddy is essentially another word for enclosure?

    i realize i cannot delete/write to it, but if by meaning "read", will that mean i can click on a file on the PC HDD and drag it onto a waiting dvd-r on my mac desktop?
     
  12. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #12
    Yes, "read" includes copying.
     
  13. peter tron, Jun 16, 2013
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2013

    peter tron thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #13
    excellent!

    i have looked around at various SATAII HDD enclosures, but can you (or any of you other guys) suggest a reputable/trustworthy brand of enclosure/caddy to buy?
     
  14. chown33 macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    #14
    Most people say "enclosure" or "case". I've never heard "caddy" used to mean a disk enclosure. I usually think of a CD caddy, something that's rare to find these days:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caddy_(hardware)

    Here's another idea: a SATA docking station that connects to your computer by USB. To find examples, visit amazon.com and search for keywords usb sata dock. There's a range of prices and features, but also make sure you read and understand the return policy of the vendor, in case you don't like what you buy.

    There are also SATA dock vendors other than the ones on Amazon. Vendors like newegg.com, macsales.com, etc. Google the keywords from above.
     
  15. peter tron thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Feb 7, 2012
    Location:
    wye, ashford, kent, uk
    #15
    enclosure or caddy seems to be just term preferences for the same thing.
    although caddy's, like you said, are older (from what i have read).

    question:

    i have tried searching the internet for comparisons between "enclosures" and "docking stations", but i cannot locate anything that explains to me the differences between the two.
    docking stations appear different from enclosures cosmetically, but apart from that, are they essentially the same (or not?).
     
  16. chown33 macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    #16
    An enclosure is something you put the SATA drive in, and then close up the case. If you want to remove or swap the SATA drive, you usually have to unscrew the case and disconnect the drive. Here's one example:
    http://eshop.macsales.com/item/OWC/MSTG800U3K/

    I have a Firewire-only version of this case, and the rear plate must be unscrewed. The whole assembly then slides out (see pics on that page for views of rear panel). The drive slides onto a SATA connector on the circuit, and is held in place by 4 screws through the enclosure's slide-out circuit board.

    This particular case is more expensive than a Firewire-only or a USB-only case. So don't take that price as representative, except with other dual-interface cases.


    A docking station is basically a box with a hole on top, with a SATA connector at the bottom of the hole. You place the drive in the well, and it connects electrically, but there is no physical mounting (no screws). If you lift the drive, the docking station stays behind on the surface of your desk.

    Some docking stations have friction-fit, and/or ejector tabs. Others might have additional features.

    You should look at several and see which one you like best, and what price. There's only so much description someone can provide, and beyond that it's best for you to go to a vendor website and look at pictures. That's one reason I gave links and websites, so you could go there and look at pictures.
     
  17. peter tron thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Feb 7, 2012
    Location:
    wye, ashford, kent, uk
    #17
    ah, i see!

    upon browsing, i see that the pro's for enclosures revolve around the fact that once a drive is inserted, it is quite rigidly secure, by means of being held securely by at least four screws.

    docking stations pro's seem to be their ability to hold more than one drive at any one time (?), or the fact that if you are swapping between hard drives a lot, a docking station makes it a lot more accessible.

    as for me, i will only be concentrating on the one drive, so an enclosure sounds just right for me.
     
  18. peter tron thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2012
    Location:
    wye, ashford, kent, uk
    #18
    can you recommend any enclosures?

    it is SATA
    3.5inch

    i live in the UK

    i've checked amazon/ebay and pc world

    amazon and ebay generally come up with 'Startech'
    pc world generally sell 'Dynamode'

    is there any real need to shell out £50 instead of £15-£20?

    i would appreciate any recommendations etc

    baz
     

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