Reading the iPad in direct sunlight really won't be bad at all.

Discussion in 'iPad' started by christall109, Feb 12, 2010.

  1. christall109 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2007
    #1
    The other day I was outside in direct sunlight and I could see fine on my iPhone. It was really sunny and there's about a 15 inches of snow on the ground which added a very tough glare. One thing I noticed, and I did have a good pair of sunglasses on at the time, that reading an LCD (like the iPhone's) in direct sunlight isn't bad at all. In fact, I thought it almost looked like eInk.

    What's all the big fuss about eInk anyway?

    I think Apple made the right choice going with an LCD. However, Pixel Qi's screen would be the best. Let's just hope that tech gets up to Apple's standards soon.
     
  2. samcraig macrumors P6

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    Jun 22, 2009
    #2
    Polarized sunglasses will do that
     
  3. christall109 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Jun 15, 2007
    #3
    Just a quick note too, I took of the sunglasses and didn't think it was that bad without them.

    Maybe it's my young eyes.

    I always laugh when my Dad has to hold his hand out about 3 feet away from his face when he tries to look at my iPhone without his glasses... I'm terrible.
     
  4. Julien macrumors G3

    Julien

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    Jun 30, 2007
    Location:
    Atlanta
    #4
    Laugh now but hope you live long enough to be laughed at yourself.:eek:;)
     
  5. Sketh macrumors 6502

    Sketh

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    Sep 14, 2007
    #5

    The Pixel Qi's screen has horrible viewing angles, but once that technology matures it'll be interesting to see how much it's used.

    I'm not on board with all of the people saying you can't stare at an LCD screen for hours at a time reading.

    What do you think you do online?
     
  6. dave1812dave macrumors 6502a

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    May 15, 2009
    #6
    I agree with you 1000%. I spend tons of time reading on various LCD screens and strangely enough I've found that for reading books via the Kindle app, my Touch is far superior to reading on my 25" LCD monitor. I use different reading glasses for viewing each--so it's not like I'm straining to see the PC monitor--it's just that for heavy text reading, the Touch works great for me. Having said that, I can spend countless hours on line, using the 25", or my 23" without any eye issues. I could be wrong, but I don't think Kindle-happy people really have spent any time even TRYING to read on a Touch. IF they did, I can't imagine them ALL saying that LCD screens are so terrible for reading on.
     
  7. chrisqmalibu macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2010
    #7
    Here is how I use the iPad as e-reader under direct sunlight. I use white on black mode, maximum brightness, polarized sunglasses and moving it around a bit :)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NksXmYdji1A


     
  8. Ciclismo macrumors 6502a

    Ciclismo

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    Jun 15, 2010
    Location:
    Germany
    #8
    I don't understand why people are making such a fuss - probably because by focussing on one of the few faults it validates, in their mind, their poo-pooing.

    It's also not an issue here in New Zealand - were told to stay the hell indoors or in the shade during the brightest times of day (11am-2pm or so) because we have one of the highest rates of skin cancer in the developed world, thanks to the thin ozone layer.
     
  9. chrisqmalibu macrumors newbie

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    Sep 20, 2010
    #9
    For some, e-reading is a major feature. Some people can read and do read still :)

     
  10. Ciclismo macrumors 6502a

    Ciclismo

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    Jun 15, 2010
    Location:
    Germany
    #10
    And it is for me too - the reason I bought the iPad was because of the mass of required readings I was issued for this semester. One of my politics papers alone had around the 60 odd different readings, some in excess of 300 pages long. But when I am doing some serious reading, even with an e-ink display or paper book, I do this inside so that I can remove myself some of the distractions present outside. And reduce my risk of skin cancer.

     

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