Recommended Settings While Traveling in Japan

Discussion in 'iPhone Tips, Help and Troubleshooting' started by skehan35, Dec 24, 2009.

  1. skehan35 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2009
    #1
    Hi Everyone,

    I'm off to Japan next week and am trying to determine how to configure my iphone so that I don't get hammered by data.

    I'm not planning to make or accept calls so I'm wondering if leaving it in Airplane mode while turning on WIFI makes the most sense. Am I correct to assume that this configuration avoids any downloading of data via a cellular network?

    Btw, I was stunned to learn on ATT's site that the iPhone will work in Japan. First phone I've ever owned that's compatible in Japan.

    Many thanks in advance for your help!
     
  2. -aggie- macrumors P6

    -aggie-

    Joined:
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    #2
    You only need to turn data roaming off. See this link from AT&T on international travel:

    http://www.wireless.att.com/learn/international/roaming/iphone-travel-tips.jsp

    They don't mention using airplane mode, but I would also do that, since you risk getting charged if you answer the phone or check voicemail. It's up to you if you want to be able to receive calls only.

    To be ultra safe, some even take out their sim card.
     
  3. skehan35 thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Dec 24, 2009
    #3
    Thanks for the quick reply. Am I correct to assume that in airplane mode there's zero chance of hopping on a cellular network?
     
  4. -aggie- macrumors P6

    -aggie-

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    #4
    Yes.
     
  5. J&JPolangin macrumors 68030

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    #5
    ...Softbank is the company here that uses the iPhone and it has pretty bad coverage compared to NTT and AU (which is why I won't get an iPhone)...

    My AU phone roams to most other countries in the world with CDMA (there's also GSM phones for other regions that CDMA doesn't cover) so it makes it really convenient to travel with my "Global Passport" phone.

    One thing to note, I hope you have apple care because your battery life WILL be bad once you charge it here in Japan and take it home to use/charge it due to the 100v 50Hz power here...

    Have fun on your trip!
     
  6. skubish macrumors 68030

    skubish

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    #6
    Do you have proof of this somewhere? The charging adapters are rated for 100-240V 50-60Hz. It is converting the AC input to 5V DC anyway so I don't see how this would effect your battery. Also I have charged my iPhone many times while in Japan without issue
     
  7. aristobrat macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2005
    #7
    Airplane mode is probably the best bet. If not, call AT&T and disable voicemail before you go.

    If your phone registers to a tower in Japan and someone calls you, if you don't answer the call (and let it go to voicemail), you'll still incur roaming voice charges.
     
  8. nastebu macrumors 6502

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    May 5, 2008
    #8
    I live in Japan too, and I haven't had this problem with my originally-American iPhone.
     
  9. skehan35 thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Dec 24, 2009
    #9
    Thanks for all the great tips! Interesting note regarding the charger... I've never had issues w/my laptops while in Japan. Odd. Maybe I'll use my Richard Solo charger just in case.
     
  10. sushi Moderator emeritus

    sushi

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    #10
    SoftBank coverage is decent.

    There are places I get reception with my iPhone 3GS where I didn't with my DoCoMo phone or my friend with their AU phone. Reception varies.

    Now in the past, say 10 years ago, there was a huge difference in coverage. But that's changed considerably over time. That's one reason DoCoMo's cell phone market share has plummeted over time.

    Sorry, but this is a bogus statement. Apple universal power adapters accept 100-240V and from 50 to 60 Hz. Anything within those parameters produces acceptable DC power as required.

    Additionally, your comment about Japan's power is incorrect. The Eastern part of Mainland Japan is 100V and 50Hz. However, the Western part of Mainland Japan is 100V and 60Hz. The dividing line is around Nagoya.
     
  11. J&JPolangin macrumors 68030

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    Thule GL @ the TOW
    #11
    Allcon, I live off base and work on base = at home my power is different than my office... any portable unit I use and charge both on and off base has much worse than original battery life (any of my 5 various iPods, my Toshiba laptop, my Sony laptop, my eeePC netbook, my portable DVD players, my cell phones, etc... its all personal experience traveling between the USA, Japan, on-base and off base for business or pleasure)... it was just a recommendation, if you choose not to listen = your choice...

    I don't charge my whitebook on base because of the above experience (and until I PCS to the USA, my whitebook probably won't go TAD with me either).

    BTW, thanks for that tidbit on the 60Hz power, I've never been around Nagoya so I didn't know that...
     
  12. sushi Moderator emeritus

    sushi

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    #12
    Universal power supplies provide consistent DC voltage and amperage when the input is within 100 to 240 volts and from 50 to 60 Hertz. So as long as you have good AC input, you are going to get good DC output and thus the batteries will work fine and last a long time.

    The issue is when the input is not within the range specified above. In your case, you may be experiencing sub 100 volt fluctuations where you live. This is pretty common -- especially in older buildings. This may be why you are having issues with some of your batteries.

    For a solution, you might consider a UPS with voltage boost. That's what I did in my last place where the voltage level was below 100 volts most of the time.

    BTW, on base the voltage can vary as well. However, in the 20 plus years that I've been here, I've never seen it below 100 volts, or much below 110 for that matter. YMMV.
     

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