Recording rap vocals in logic

Discussion in 'Digital Audio' started by DIMEZ, Dec 15, 2010.

  1. DIMEZ macrumors 6502a

    DIMEZ

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2009
    Location:
    MD
    #1
    Ok, before I start I will list the equipment used.
    Macbookpro Unibody running Logic 9
    Focusrite Saffire audio interface
    Rode Nt1a Microphone

    I am new to logic and want to mix down my raw vocals. Can anyone help with what setting or filters i should use?

    How do a give my vocals more of a full sound so it doesn't sound like they're over powering the music.

    Any help or advice would be appreciated! Thanks
     
  2. BlackJack325 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2010
    #2
    Id suggest you look up some tutorials online, but pretty much just listen to the music as a whole.

    Is the music/beats already on Logic?
    and you already recorded the vocals?

    The only "effects" id use on vocals are Reverb and a touch of delay. Mess with the compressor/limiter for a bit. Unless you want some hints of distortion on vocals for a bit extra. Its up to you
     
  3. Xavier macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2006
    Location:
    Columbus
    #3
    Reverb. I wouldn't compress vocals, and use some EQ.
     
  4. DIMEZ thread starter macrumors 6502a

    DIMEZ

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2009
    Location:
    MD
    #4

    Yeah i read some tutorials, even download a few channel strip settings but I figured I would find people with more experience on here so I thought I would ask.

    The beat was already made so I tracked it out in logic.

    Yes i recorded the vocals already.

    thanks for the suggestions so far, I will try it out
     
  5. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2002
    Location:
    toronto
    #5
    if you post a sample of the vocal and a sample of what you want it to sound like, people can be specific about what to try.
     
  6. paolo- macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2008
    #6
    The few times I recorded rap vocals for a friend of mine who came in with pre made beats, he recorded on two tracks. One main vocal and one where he'd punch up certain words or parts, I think that's called adlibbing. I found the adlib track to add another dimension to the mix.

    If the performance was good, there's no need to add too much glitter. You should be able to get something half decent just by mixing it without any effects. He rapped fairly close to the mic so I had to do quite a bit of automations just with the volume of his voice so it would remain pretty constant through the mix. I also compressed it a fair bit so it would sound smoother. I added a really small room reverb so it would sit in nicely with beat. And a small eq curve. For the adlib track you can go a bit more creative for one of his track I put a bit of distortion. But I didn't compress them much so they would add a bit more dynamics to the mix. On the final mix I put a bit of multiband compression so it would tie in together with the mix and bounce a bit more.

    I find that EQ and compression preset are fairly useless. They depend on so much stuff, the presets can give you an idea of how to achieve a certain sound but for the most part they were made for a certain person in a certain situation. But yeah, the adlib track ;)
     
  7. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2002
    Location:
    toronto
    #7
    +1

    i always automate vocals to get a consistent level, then apply compression (and i almost always use compression at record time and mix time, in modest amounts).

    in addition to reverb, usually plate for lead vox, i'll create a pair of delays, one that's short and one that's longer, and pan them opposite one another. these are very subtle and just for adding depth before i apply reverb.

    during automation, i'll also de-emphasize ess sounds before putting on a de-esser, so it doesn't have to work so hard (and it ends up being a lot easier to set and not nearly as destructive as it would be otherwise).

    but the most important thing is getting it right when recording. the right mic, the right positioning, the right performance, the right room, should get you 90% of the way there. the above is the other 10%.
     
  8. DIMEZ thread starter macrumors 6502a

    DIMEZ

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2009
    Location:
    MD
    #8
    thanks for everyone's advice, i am gonna try out these response tonight and see what works best!
     
  9. SFXsource macrumors newbie

    SFXsource

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2009
    #9
    I always use compression on vocals after recording to give it punch without overpowering the music and to smooth out the dynamics. Definitely use compression.
     

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