Recording Vinyl

Discussion in 'Digital Audio' started by t-rev, May 29, 2009.

  1. t-rev macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2009
    #1
    I have a SoundMaster record recorder. I used Adacity and the USB port to record a few of my old vinyl records. I now have Adobe Soundboard or Roxio CD Spin Doctor. The SoundMaster has the red/white RCA cables, what would I need in order to plug that into my uMBP? Is there some sort of adapter that would improve the quality?
     
  2. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #2
    So this turn table has both a USB and an audio ooutput and you are not hapy with the quality of the built-in audio interface and want to use the audio RCA cable to some other interface? Is that it?

    Do you know the problem is with the USB interface and not with the tone arm, cartridge or the turn table itself. Or maybe the record is just worn out?

    Do you have a budject? I'm thinking you will need so spend over $200 for a good interface that does 24-bits and 192 samples per second. But then you are going to also want to upgrade the other parts and the sky is the limit with audiophile grade turn tables
     
  3. GoCubsGo macrumors Nehalem

    GoCubsGo

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2005
    #3
    Just as ChrisA eventually said, you need an interface of sorts to use RCA cables, otherwise, you're destined to use USB forever ... for e ver.
     
  4. t-rev thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2009
    #4
    I guess I shouldn't say that I'm not happy with the USB interface, I thought that the RCA route might produce a little better sound and was wondering exactly what the correct cable I need for that is.
     
  5. GoCubsGo macrumors Nehalem

    GoCubsGo

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2005
    #5
    You are correct, RCA will produce a better sound but you need an interface. I am curious, are you recording things that are available via MP3 today or are these rare albums that you cannot find in iTunes or Amazon (or sites like it)? I ask because I love just listening to vinyl. There is something lost with an iPod that shuffles hours of music whereas 45 minutes per side and you're set. I have a very small collection that I am building, much of which I own in digital format.
     
  6. jeffy.dee-lux macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2003
    Location:
    montreal
    #6
    he could always just get an RCA to 3mm adaptor and go through the line-in if he's got one in his mac, though unless this turntable has it's own amp, he'd need to plug it in through a separate amplifier, though those aren't too hard to find in basements and garage sales.
     
  7. UltraNEO* macrumors 601

    UltraNEO*

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2007
    Location:
    近畿日本
    #7
    5mV/47kΩ

    You sure that would work?

    I'm think the OP needs a Phono Preamp first! Most turntables don't actually amplify the signal, therefore at default it should be 5mV/47kΩ. The typical in-line level of the Mac requires a minimum of 450mV/100kΩ, hence integrated power amps have a separate input for phono/turntables.
     
  8. jeffy.dee-lux macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2003
    Location:
    montreal
    #8
    ya, so if the OP has an old amp/tuner sitting around in the basement, that would do the trick.
     
  9. UltraNEO* macrumors 601

    UltraNEO*

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2007
    Location:
    近畿日本
    #9
    Only if it has a Line out.

    What the OP really needs is an inexpensive "op-amp" with RCA in and RAC out. This will amplify the signal to regular 'in-line' levels.
     
  10. hakukani macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    Location:
    Hawaii
    #10
    Phonographs need to correct for the RIAA EQ curve, as explained here:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RIAA_equalization
     
  11. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #11
    No. The signal on the vinyl record is compressed. The signal needs to go into a phono preamp first where the RIAA compensation is applied which boosts the high frequencies. All "modern" records are recorded using same kind curve which has to be removed before playback.

    That said you can preform this function in software, however I think it's best applied with a real phono preamp.

    The question for the OP is --- How much are you willing to spend? and How importent is audio quality. For example do you hear the studio room aucustics and can you tell where on the cymble the dummer is hitting, Are you concerned with stero "sound stage"? Are do you just want to hear the song?

    THere are some cheap ways to record that are good enough for many people but you could also spend $5,000. It makes no sense to reecommend anything without knowing your goals.

    But we do know that the simple USB turn table is not good enough for you. The very simple suggestion you not be much better so I'm thinking you are looking at maybe $100 to $250
     

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