Become a MacRumors Supporter for $50/year with no ads, ability to filter front page stories, and private forums.

AppleFan22

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jan 3, 2014
276
27
In Recovery OS, Disk Utility has found corruption from its First Aid scan, but it says it can only be resolved in Recovery. The problem is, it was already in Recovery. The same thing appears when I run First Aid in Safe Boot, or normal boot. I've attached a picture of the message that appears.

I'm running macOS Sierra PB 2.

UPDATE:
I might be wrong, but this corruption appears to be putting my Mac into a state where it nearly always crashes, so I need solutions ASAP please!
 

Attachments

  • IMG_0013.JPG
    IMG_0013.JPG
    1 MB · Views: 314

JohnDS

macrumors 65816
Oct 25, 2015
1,183
249
Please run it again, and this time click on "show details" and then post the results.
 

AppleFan22

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jan 3, 2014
276
27
Not sure this is going to be of much help, as it says something about a success!
 

Attachments

  • Screen Shot 2016-07-21 at 03.27.30.png
    Screen Shot 2016-07-21 at 03.27.30.png
    113.1 KB · Views: 523

JohnDS

macrumors 65816
Oct 25, 2015
1,183
249
The second screen shot does not appear to have been run from the recovery partition as the recovery partition does not appear in the disk utility window.
 

AppleFan22

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jan 3, 2014
276
27
The second screen shot does not appear to have been run from the recovery partition as the recovery partition does not appear in the disk utility window.

Just reran the operation, and it came back with the EXACT same results. However, I did run the First Aid for the boot disk (Macintosh HD) and it came up with these results... Sorry I can't upload them here, according the MacRumors server, 2.9MB > 4.9MB... https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B3P6dA-Eo36_TGVDNlp5UFlRZUU

Following these checks, I tried to boot, got past the password screen, and it crashed again...
 

JohnDS

macrumors 65816
Oct 25, 2015
1,183
249
Will it start up if you do a safe boot while holding down the shift key?
 

JohnDS

macrumors 65816
Oct 25, 2015
1,183
249
Does it still crash when you are in safe mode? If not, the problem is one of the log in items in your user account.

Open Users and Groups in System Preferences, go to the Logon Items tab and highlight each item and remove it using the minus button. (Unchecking does not disable the item, it only forces it to load in the background - you need to remove the item altogether to stop it from loading.)
 

AppleFan22

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jan 3, 2014
276
27
Does it still crash when you are in safe mode?

It didn't crash, but that doesn't mean to say it wouldn't crash if I were to use it. It doesn't ALWAYS crash in a normal boot either, just occasionally. However in recent days there have probably been 4 successful boots and 6 crashes...

If not, the problem is one of the log in items in your user account.

This cannot be the problem, as I do not have any apps that launch automatically at log in, except Avira Antivirus, but I've had that without issue for many months now. I'm more concerned that Disk Utility doesn't believe it's in Recovery OS to be honest.
 

Fishrrman

macrumors Penryn
Feb 20, 2009
25,310
10,328
Get an external drive.

Install a copy of the OS on it, so that it's completely bootable "to the finder".

Boot from the external drive.

Launch Disk Utility and "aim it" at your INTERNAL drive.

Problem solved.
 

blackxacto

macrumors 65816
Jun 15, 2009
1,064
112
Middle TN
In Recovery OS, Disk Utility has found corruption from its First Aid scan, but it says it can only be resolved in Recovery. The problem is, it was already in Recovery. The same thing appears when I run First Aid in Safe Boot, or normal boot. I've attached a picture of the message that appears.

I'm running macOS Sierra PB 2.

UPDATE:
I might be wrong, but this corruption appears to be putting my Mac into a state where it nearly always crashes, so I need solutions ASAP please!
This is a test reply, sorry to use your thread.
 

AppleFan22

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jan 3, 2014
276
27
Get an external drive.

Install a copy of the OS on it, so that it's completely bootable "to the finder".

Boot from the external drive.

Launch Disk Utility and "aim it" at your INTERNAL drive.

Problem solved.

Problem not solved, it says the exact same thing!

Is there any way I can access Recovery OS from the external drive? I'm thinking maybe if I used Recovery OS from the external drive, it might leave the internal drive available for Disk Utility to do its stuff?
[doublepost=1469222995][/doublepost]What would happen if I tried to unmount the internal disk, running Disk Utility from the EXTERNAL disk, and ran First Aid then? Would that work?
[doublepost=1469223069][/doublepost]
This is a test reply, sorry to use your thread.

Not a problem, mind if I ask why you need to test your replies?
 

Attachments

  • Screen Shot 2016-07-22 at 22.17.00.png
    Screen Shot 2016-07-22 at 22.17.00.png
    123.8 KB · Views: 276

AppleFan22

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jan 3, 2014
276
27
UPDATE:

Since the external boot didn't work, I tried doing Internet Recovery, which produced a huge list of information, (like, really huge. OS X Mavericks Disk Utility was much better, let's face it). However, after clicking "Repair Disk", it did a load of tasks, then said "Alert. This disk needs to be repaired. Click Repair Disk.". I did that a few times, then gave up. I tried to copy the logs to a Google Drive through the "Access help online" thing, but it froze so I had to do a manual shutdown. Upon boot I was greeted by a lovely flashing folder with a question mark on it, which stayed there. I checked it out on my phone, and official Apple Support said to power off, then boot to recovery, and use the "Choose startup disk" feature. That produced the same result, so I gave up, erased the disk, and reinstalled macOS. Checking Disk Utility now produces totally clean results.

Thanks for everyone's help though!
 
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.