Referees in my resume (applying for a job)

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by Nobita, Jan 2, 2011.

  1. Nobita macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2008
    Location:
    La la land
    #1
    Hi all,

    I'm in a weird situation. In my current job, I'm just finishing a project that will be due around Feb/March 2011. But I decided that it's time for me to move on and look for another job. However in my resume, I put the names of important people in my current job who knows me well.

    What I'm afraid of is, what if the people who decide to interview me for a new job rings my current colleague? They are important people and I'm afraid if they know that I'm leaving, they won't give me credit in this project that we're just finishing off.

    Since this is my first time changing job, I'm not sure what to do... I guess another option is to resign first from my current company, then start looking for another job. But that might leave me unemployed for a few months... (or God knows how long). What should I do?
     
  2. avro707, Jan 2, 2011
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2011

    avro707 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2010
    #2
    Well, I've only really done this in goverment departments, where even though you are leaving, you are just going to another part of the government, and it's all just really the same thing.

    I've also had the fortune of working with really good managers over the years.

    Firstly, in my experience, I don't tell the current manager until I know I've got an interview.

    When I've submitted the claim for position (addressing the selection criteria) and I get an invitation for an interview, that's when I talk to the current management - and discuss the criteria for the next job, so they know what questions they might be asked, and then they are prepared for that.

    Do you think your current management will be quite vindictive if you leave? Have you done the best work you think you've been able to do on the project you are working on? Are there any indications that there are other possibilities within the organisation that you could move into? I've always thought that it's better to keep good staff - rather than getting new ones in all the time who must be trained in the ways of the organisation, etc.

    Also, is your job a permanent full-time one or temporary/contract (which it sounds like it is)? If contract - then your approach could be a bit different.

    I'm sure most new employers will understand these sorts of situations. Whatever you do, don't resign first and then start looking - look first and then weigh up your options. There is nothing stopping you from looking at other jobs from home. And it's not nearly as brazen as a former colleague of mine who would come into work each Wednesday morning and proudly proclaim over his morning coffee, Wednesday was the best day of the week because there were always new jobs advertised that day, then he'd sit at the desk browsing the new jobs for a short while until the first tasks started to roll in.. He applied for lots of jobs, but never seriously intended to leave. Although he grumbled non-stop about his job, he was happy enough to stay there - and he did a fine job of his work (especially since it was such a thankless job).
     
  3. JulesNYC macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2006
    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY
    #3
    I've got umpires in my resume. ;)

    Don't put your references on the resume -- a simple 'References furnished upon request' at the bottom is fine. If and when they ask for them, you can worry about it then. But try to use references from other jobs...and use people from your current job that you trust and can give a heads-up to when the time comes.

    Most importantly, make sure your resume is double-checked with no spelling mistakes.
     
  4. Nobita thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2008
    Location:
    La la land
    #4
    Would it be different if I'm working for the university? One of the reasons why I leave is just because they can't yet afford their promised full time position for me. I feel quite bad because my boss said I will definitely get a full time position this year (but this year has 12 more months coming), and he's fighting hard with the management to keep me there. So at the moment no, I work part time here with hours that looks like full-time hours.

    Hard to say... I've seen people leave a few times, I haven't really got to talk to those people much, but the management seem to be quite disappointed with them. I think I've done my best work on this project. (I hope so!)

    Thanks for the replies – I think I might go with getting reference from my other senior who know what I can do as well. I know he wants me to stay as well. I will also only tell them once I've got an interview... Or would you guys think that the "reference is available upon request" line will be better?
     
  5. avro707, Jan 2, 2011
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2011

    avro707 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2010
    #5
    And often, it doesn't have to be a manager that gives the reference. It's more useful when it is someone you work closely with, as they are more likely to be able to give good answers to the questions they may be asked.

    The references upon request line is a good one.

    And depending on what your new potential job requires in the application for the position - avoid "motherhood" statements like "I have experience in blah". Demonstrate to them how you have used that experience to achieve a benefit - practical examples. Keep it fairly concise as well - don't do long stories.

    If your boss is fighting to get a full-time position for you, then that's a different story. That means that obviously they don't want you to go, and it might be what the boss needs to get the budget for your full-time position. Maybe it's time for one of those "future" discussions to see where things are headed. Good managers should be able to handle this without holding the threat of dismissal.
     
  6. Nobita thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2008
    Location:
    La la land
    #6
    Well, my team is very small, we just have 5 people in the team, and my boss is the only one that work very closely with me. So I don't get many choices. Anyway I think I'll go with references will be provided upon request.

    Hmm, not quite sure what you mean. I work as a programmer, so I typically list projects that I work on, including the main features and programming languages that I used. I'm actually making a jump to work as an iOS programmer, so I don't have any referees that can testify upon my iOS experience. My referee can testify on my general programming and problem solving skills though.

    Well we had the "future discussion" last year. They are finding ways to get me a fulltime contract, however even they don't have enough budget to do that until now. I know they don't want me to go, but I'm wondering if they can handle my leave gracefully... I still want to be friends with them, I still want to talk to them on a regular basis. So I really feel bad for doing this...
     

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