Refurb Alum Macbook 2.0GHz has only 150GB?

Discussion in 'MacBook' started by CSilver, Jan 31, 2009.

  1. CSilver macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2009
    Location:
    Canada
    #1
    Ummm, I was wondering if my Macbook is normal or not...
    I received my refurb Macbook on friday morning jan 30th. I didn't get to play with it for the whole day and now I am starting to understand stuff and all that. I found something interesting though...

    I thought the Alum Macbook 2.0GHz comes with 160GB of hard drvie??
    How come mine has only 149.5 GB on the about this Mac info...?

    Any ideas?? Should I call the apple customer service??
     
  2. Tallest Skil macrumors P6

    Tallest Skil

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2006
    Location:
    1 Geostationary Tower Plaza
    #2
    Call every hard drive manufacturer and yell at them. Apple has nothing to do with their lie.

    To them, a kilobyte is 1,000 bytes, but to an OS, a "kilobyte" (really a kibibyte) is 1,024 bytes.
     
  3. Lexoticstylez02 macrumors 6502a

    Lexoticstylez02

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2007
    Location:
    Orlando, Florida
    #3
    The amount stated is never equal when using hard drive storage. I can't remember the exact reason why but anything you buy using storage will be this way. My 16GB iPhone is really only 14.6GB and my 250GB HDD on my Alum MB is 232.57GB.

    EDIT: What he said ^^
     
  4. CSilver thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2009
    Location:
    Canada
    #4
    Lol so I guess I was just not told or knew about this FAT LIES made by Hard Drvice Manufacturer :mad: Thanks for the quick reply ;)
     
  5. 5280m macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2009
    #5
    Its because when you buy a hard drive on a computer it always has the * saying "Actual formatted capacity may be less."
     
  6. KnightWRX macrumors Pentium

    KnightWRX

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2009
    Location:
    Quebec, Canada
    #6
    The kibibyte (and mebibyte, gibibyte, etc..) term was coined after Hard drive manufacturers switched to the 1 KB = 1,000 bytes method of marking their drives. This is recent, barely 10 years ago. Ever since then though, HD makers have been inflating their drive's size with this method.
     
  7. Chundles macrumors G4

    Chundles

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2005
    #7
    Oh god, do I have to explain this again?

    1000 bytes IS A KILOBYTE. The HDD manufacturers are correct in what they are providing.

    SI prefixes are unwavering standards, if it's 1024 bytes IT IS NOT A KILOBYTE regardless of what the computer or long standing convention says.

    If I buy a 500GB hard drive I expect it to have 500,000,000,000 bytes which, because a computer thinks that a kilobyte is 1024 bytes (using the "near enough is good enough" school of thought that has worked so well in the past) it will report it as having about 465 "GB".

    Either it needs to say 465GiB or 500GB. 465GB is false.
     
  8. KnightWRX macrumors Pentium

    KnightWRX

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2009
    Location:
    Quebec, Canada
    #8
    It wasn't so until 1998, when the IEC established the Mebi, Kibi, Gibi notation. Before then, it was widely accepted and standardised that 1024 bytes = 1 kilobyte.

    Also, before this came to past, HD manufacturers used the 1024 bytes per KB like everyone else. It might have changed, but it doesn't mean we need to forget history and who changed this standard for their own profit.

    In case you're wondering, computers don't "approximate". The 1024 is a very round and exact number. It is exactly 10000000000. 1000 on the other hand, is far from round, it is 01111101000. Hence why computers never used the round decimal numbers to actually count anything.
     

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