refurb vs new 17"

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by raymondthimmes, Dec 17, 2010.

  1. raymondthimmes macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2008
    Location:
    Columbus, Ohio
    #1
    So I am planning to purchase a new laptop soon. Preferably a 17" mbp.

    I was pricing out a new vs. refurbed and the difference seems to be a considerable savings on the core i5 model? close to $420?

    What is the main difference between the new and refurbed models? Is it just that it's not "fresh off the lot"?

    thoughts? thanks!
     
  2. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #3
    Or just returned by a consumer.

    Some people believe you're better off with a refurb because they go through a more thorough examination, verification process to ensure they are not defective. Personally, I go with new, but I've not really heard of any complaints by people going the refurb route.
     
  3. jenzjen macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    #4
    Only with Apple due to their warranty do I go rfb unless I really need to have it. Only one issue in about 10 orders, and Apple gave me a partial credit for my trouble so no complaints from me going rfb.
     
  4. tasslehawf, Dec 17, 2010
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2010

    tasslehawf macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2003
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    #5
    Since Apple is the only one that sells refurb (for the most part), but you always pay sales tax when you buy from Apple, you may get a better deal buying a new one from an online reseller (such as Amazon or MacConnection) than buying a refurb + tax.

    Apple new: $2299 + $189.67 tax = $2488.67
    Apple refurb: $1869 + $154.19 tax = $2023.19
    Amazon: $2,097.44 + free 2 day shipping if you have Amazon Prime (or $4 next day)

    MacConnection has some good deals on BTO configurations which you can only otherwise get from Apple.

    AppleInsider has a comparison chart of Mac deals: http://www.appleinsider.com/mac_price_guide/

    (I used Texas sales tax)
     

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