Regarding "n-wireless."

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by ZiggyPastorius, Oct 29, 2007.

  1. ZiggyPastorius macrumors 68040

    ZiggyPastorius

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2007
    Location:
    Berklee College of Music
    #1
    Okay, so I'm a completely noob, and have no idea what this even means...I was reading one day in a comparison of a Mac and a PC, something about the Macbook's wireless card having something (something about an "n") that makes it like 10x faster with a compatible router, and something that gives it like a 1000x speed boost or something, I have no idea x_X

    I know that's really vague, but does anyone think they can explain the cards in the Macbooks a little better to me and what I need in a router to get this supposed "speed boost," assuming I didn't completely misunderstand?
     
  2. mankar4 macrumors 6502a

    mankar4

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2007
    Location:
    USA
    #2
    there are 3 wireless standards out in the mass market: b, g, and n. b is a max of 11mbps, g is 54mbps, and n theoretically goes to 300mbps, but it's hard to achieve that. the macbooks have a built in wireless card that is compatible with wireless n routers in addition to wireless b and g. Note that you will only take advantage of your wireless n laptop capabilities if you have a wireless n router.
     
  3. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Location:
    Northern/Central VA
    #3
    There are more than 3 standards (legacy, a and y come immediately to mind,) however everything else is essentially correct (except none of the advertised speeds are real-world.) If your wireless AP has 3 antennas, it's likely to be n compatible (It's still a draft spec, so interoperability won't be 100%- Dlink works for me with my MacBook.) Each successive standard for home networks has increased the range at which it will work, as well as resilience to interference. If you have connection issues away from the AP, or microwave/cordless phone issues, 802.11n is the way to go (with WPA security if you have older Apple cards or WPA2 if not and a long, random key for either.)
     
  4. Bunker macrumors member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2007
    #4
    Had anyone matched and benchmarked the performance of Mac's Wireless-N with non-Apple Airport Extreme product like Linksys or DLINK?
     
  5. ZiggyPastorius thread starter macrumors 68040

    ZiggyPastorius

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2007
    Location:
    Berklee College of Music
    #5
    Okay, I kind of understand now. How exactly do I know if my router is "n-compatible"? Does it just say on the front? I'm not near it right now so I can't check, but I'll look later.
     
  6. killmoms macrumors 68040

    killmoms

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2003
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    #6
    Unless you bought it relatively recently (in the last eight months) it's unlikely it's draft-n compatible. It's still pretty limited penetration, mostly because the spec for 802.11n is still unfinished, hence the "draft." If it is, it's probably advertised as a specific feature on the box or whatnot.
     
  7. Matiek macrumors member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2007
    #7
    Are any of the Draft-N routers panning out right now or are they still trying to approve the draft. I've heard a lot of negative feed back about Draft-N routers not living up to the hype.

    Also, I'm looking at buying the airport extreme but I've heard that it's not compatible with an older o/s like 10.2, even if it has a wireless card; which, is what my room mate has. Does anyone know if I can get my room mates machine to work by plugging it into the LAN port?

    Is there another Draft-N router out there that would suit me better? I like the airport because of the USB port and the ability to plug my external hard drive into it.
     

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