Regular 13 inch Macbook Pro or 13 inch Machbook pro with retina display?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by hammerton, Oct 25, 2012.

  1. hammerton macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2012
    #1
    Hi everyone,

    I'm looking to purchase a 13 inch Macbook pro as a graduation gift to myself and I was wondering if I should purchase the 13 inch retina display macbook pro or should I just purchase the regular 13 inch macbook pro. Keeping in mind that the regular macbook pro comes with a dedicated graphics card, optical drive but at the expense of less ram, slower hdd and no retina display in comparison to the 13 inch rMBP?

    If I purchase a Macbook through my school I get ~$100 CDN off. So a regular 13 inch Macbook pro is $1099 CDN and a 13 inch rMBP is $1599 CDN.

    So which do you think is the better option at the moment?

    Thank you for your time.
     
  2. switon, Oct 25, 2012
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2012

    switon macrumors 6502a

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    Sep 10, 2012
    #2
    RE: that cMBP 13"...

    Hi,

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't believe the 13" cMBP comes with a discrete GPU, both the 13" cMBP and the 13" rMBP use integrated GPUs...

    So, it basically boils down to whether the Retina display plus SSD is worth the extra $500 CDN to you. Of course, the cMBP has an optical drive while the rMBP does not, but the rMBP has two Thunderbolt ports and two USB3 ports but no Ethernet and no Firewire 800 while the cMBP has only one Thunderbolt port but does have Ethernet and Firewire and two USB3 ports. Because of daisy-chaining, the second TB port on the rMBP will serve to expand to provide ethernet and Firewire (once the Belkin dock is available, that is). The rMBP does have a HDMI port for a second/third external HDTV display. So, it really depends upon your intended use as to which machine is best for you.

    Switon
     
  3. hammerton thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Oct 25, 2012
    #3
    Ah right, sorry about that. But what I meant by "dedicated" gpu was that the 13" cMBP comes with a NVIDIA GeForce GT 650M where as the 13" rMBP does not.

    And sorry, bit of a newbie question. Why is the regular MBP abbreviated to cMBP?
     
  4. switon, Oct 25, 2012
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2012

    switon macrumors 6502a

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    #4
    RE: Once again...

    Hi,

    I believe the 13" cMBP does NOT come with the GT 650M discrete graphics GPU. The 15" cMBP does, but not the 13". Correct me if I am wrong.

    The c of cMBP stands for "classic" as opposed to "retina" for rMBP.

    Switon
     
  5. NewishMacGuy macrumors 6502a

    NewishMacGuy

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2007
    #5
    cMBP = classic Macbook Pro

    ...and the cMBP-13 doesn't have and NVIDIA GPU, the 2011 model is Intel HD-3000 and 2012 is Intel HD-4000 (just like the rMBP).

    The two differences that you are missing are weight (advantage rMBP-13) and upgradeability (huge advantage to cMBP-13). The rMBP is limited to 8GB forever. That should be fine for now, unless you want to run VMs. It's also massively expensive to upgrade the storage in the rMBP, whereas you can get a 256GB SSD for ~$200 and a 750GB hybrid drive for ~$130for the cMBP-13.
     
  6. hammerton thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Oct 25, 2012
    #6
    Ohh ok. Thanks for the input.

    So with that information, would you recommend the cMBP over the rMBP at this point? Should I go with 8gb and 750gb upgrade or should I purchase the upgrades separately and install them myself?
     
  7. skaertus macrumors 68030

    skaertus

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Location:
    Brazil
    #7
    You should get the rMBP. The cMBP also comes with an integrated video card and is a thing of the past now. I wouldn't buy it for half of its price.
     
  8. Maczor macrumors regular

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    Oct 23, 2012
    Location:
    LU, Switzerland
    #8
    Not to be (too) rude or something... but seeing that you having no idea what you're talking about, just makes we wanna tell you: "Want to gift yourself? Get a box of lollipops instead. You'll be just as much of a winner."... but well, it's your money, your graduation... enjoy the lollipops! ;)
     
  9. hammerton thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Oct 25, 2012
    #9
    Hah, thanks I guess.

    I really wish you would of helped me out instead of being so pretensions... Everyone needs to start somewhere.
     
  10. Rizzm macrumors 6502a

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    Feb 5, 2012
    #10
    The price difference is the size/weight and retina display.

    If you can deal with size/weight of the classic then get that.
    If you need/want the retina screen then get that one.

    The classic is a much better deal if you can live with the small resolution. You can do any upgrades yourself as you need them down the line.
     
  11. Maczor macrumors regular

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    Oct 23, 2012
    Location:
    LU, Switzerland
    #11
    The only thing I can "help" with is telling you: Get whichever you think looks the best and you can afford... I honestly believe that there's no point in comparing each model in extreme detail because you are clearly not a power user. That being said, I'm confident ANY of the current models will fit your needs just fine and you'll be happy... At most, ask yourself the following question: Do you LOVE to play games? If you do, then try picking a model with a dedicated GPU ( do please visit http://www.apple.com and check out the PROPER specifications... otherwise you'll end up buying a 11" MBA and later on you'll be wondering why your GT 650M performs worse than on other people's 15" Retina Macbook Pro ).

    Again, sorry, but that's the most I can help with...
     
  12. hammerton thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Oct 25, 2012
    #12
    That's exactly the sort of information I need. Thank you, I really do appreciate it.

    I completely agree, I am not a power user nor do I plan on playing games on the MBP (I have a desktop for that).

    The issue is that I have been comparing, reading and watching reviews of the new 13" rMBP but I still can't believe that Intel HD 4000 GPU is powering that massive 2560x1600 resolution, is it really that powerful? And then I come on these forms and see that the rMBP suffers from a few issues like image retention (or is that only for the 15" rMBP?) and choppy scrolling.

    So it's just that I'm torn between getting the outdated cMBP or the rMBP with some issues.
     
  13. Maczor, Oct 25, 2012
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2012

    Maczor macrumors regular

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    LU, Switzerland
    #13
    Before HD 4000, notebooks had HD 3000... and those HD 3000 notebooks were powering external monitors of 2560x1600 just fine. Based on what logic would a newer and faster HD 4000 not be able to push the same amount of pixels it's weaker version can push?

    People are just exaggerating with all this integrated graphics crap... Facts are: HD 4000 is a decent GPU, it's clearly nowhere near the performance / power of dedicated GPUs, but it's decent. IT WILL WORK FINE !!!

    Also... of course no product is perfect. I am convinced that the IR issue is many times also exaggerated. I'm not saying that there aren't unlucky people out there who REALLY suffer because of IR problems, but they are the minority. The majority complaining about IR are usually exaggerating... they are in panic and are nitpicking... It's easy to find problems when you are LOOKING for them and it's just as easy to exaggerate and make a quite minor problem seem HUGE... scaring others and spreading the panic.
     
  14. mushtama macrumors member

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    Feb 14, 2012
    #14
    It depends on your needs - the 13" rMBP offers no extra power compared to the cMPB except for the speed increases found with the SSD. If you feel that the retina display would be of use to you then go for it.

    Otherwise you may consider the cMPB and upgrade RAM and SSD yourself for less than the cost of the rMBP. Not sure about $ CDN but I can get 8GB ram for GBP £32 and a 256GB SSD for £123.

    Trouble is though that the cMPB is slightly heavier and thicker than the rMPB.
     
  15. yanksrock100 macrumors 6502a

    yanksrock100

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    Oct 30, 2010
    Location:
    San Diego
    #15
    I would say rMBP. If you are going it be using that computer for prolonged use (a few hours a day), you will be very thankful for that great screen. Plus there are speed increases from the SSD.

    However, it isn't cheap. If you can afford it, rMBP would be a better buy. It has newer tech, its lighter, thinner....
     
  16. mushtama macrumors member

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    Feb 14, 2012
    #16
    I have the 13" cMBP myself and use it for the best part of 8 hours a day or so. What do you mean by being thankful for the screen in the rMBP? I personally don't have any trouble with the screen in the cMBP.
     
  17. johnnyvh macrumors newbie

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    Jun 24, 2012
    #17
    He just means that the Retina display is really great. If you used the Retina display for a couple of times, then you'll get used to it and you'll never want to go back to the older displays. (Just what i heard, i don't own a macbook at the moment). But i'm considering to buy a new macbook. Deciding between the MBA 13 inch high spec, 13 inch rMBP or the 15 inch..
    The 13 inch MBA would be fine for you and me, but the 13 inch rMBP has that nice Retina display and is also the size i wan't, 13 inch. But the 15 inch is a real powerhouse and has more value for the money, comparing to the 13 inch rMPB. If you just use it for browsing, texting, just basic thinks the MBA will fulfill your needs. If you do a lot of gaming, the 15 inch is the best option. The 13 inch rMBP is in the middle i think.. only have the integrated GPU.
     
  18. Flaskekork macrumors newbie

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    Oct 25, 2012
    #18
    i'm in a similar positon as the thread starter...

    I stand between the low-end rMBP and the high-end cMBP (but upgrade to a 128 SSD)

    I used/use my MacBook 13'' (2007), for the interwebs and basic gaming - with basic i mean: mini games... but I would want my new MB to be able to handle League of Legends... so... that being said, which is the better fit?

    performance wise the high-end cMBP 13'' is better, but the screen is so freakin' amazing in the rMBP... dunno what to do :(

    Will the retina suffice for my "needs"?
    is there a huge difference in the i5 in the rMBP and the i7 in the cMBP?
    How warm does the computer get?

    A friend of mine played league of legends on his three year old cMBP 15'' at mid settings, and the thing got pretty warm. So I just wanna know if it will handle the game... I want to avoid that the game, literary burns my new MBP, whether it's a classic or retina :p
     
  19. yanksrock100 macrumors 6502a

    yanksrock100

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    Oct 30, 2010
    Location:
    San Diego
    #19
    I just mean it will be a much better experience. The retina screen is INCREDIBLY clear. 2560x1600 is a super high resolution for any screen. The cMBP has ~1,000,000 pixels, while the rMBP has ~4,000,000. Also, it is an IPS panel, which will have better quality, viewing angles, ect.
     
  20. mushtama macrumors member

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    Feb 14, 2012
    #20
    Ah ok cool, thanks for the heads up! I'll try and go down to an apple store this weekend to see what it's like :) I think my dad's interested in one haha
     
  21. NewishMacGuy macrumors 6502a

    NewishMacGuy

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2007
    #21
    I can't tell you what's more important to you, only you can decide that. It's either:

    rMBP-13 for lighter weight, retina screen, 2 thunderbolt ports

    or

    cMBP-13 for upgradeability to 16GB, ethernet, DVD, more storage space, less money

    and

    Buying the "upgrades" from Apple should only be done when you have no other choice (rMBPs) as they are RIDICULOUS EXPENSIVE compared to the DIY options.

    For me, I was planning to buy a base rMBP-15, but instead found a 2011 cMBP-15 for $900 that I'm upgrading with a 750GB hybrid drive & 16GB for $175. It will suit me just fine for a year or two until the next gen rMBP-15 arrives with 802.11ac, Haswell, more RAM, cheaper flash drives, and minus the bugs. In my mind the rMBPs aren't yet fully baked enough for me to want to keep them long term so it makes no sense to spend the $2k now when for $1.1k I can get virtually the same performance with a little more weight and a slightly less pretty screen.

    I also happen to think that both the rMBP-13 and cMBP-13 are a bit rich for their spec, so when my wife wanted to update her ancient Macbook, I did the same for her as I did myself and bought her a 2011 cMBP-13 for $725 and upgraded it. When Apple gets realistic on the price of the rMBP-13 and gives it Haswell integrated graphics, 802.11ac, 16GB ram, cheaper flash drives, and bug fixes, I'll get her one.
     
  22. idunn macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2008
    #22
    Enticements and price of Version A

    In considering the 13" retina, one might reflect if the first iteration of the MacBook Air was worth it? Novel, unique, stylish, yes; also underpowered and overpriced. The Air has since grown up and is a significantly better computer and value. The Version A retina models, particularly the 13", may very well be in a similar category.

    No doubt the 13" retina is beautiful and tempting, but, at $2,000 to obtain decent storage, aggressively overpriced to obtain essentially a retina screen, less weight, and a more svelte shape. The other specs in relation to the standard MBP are the same or better in the formers case, and an SSD significantly less installed on one's own. So worth it? If one doesn't mind spending the money.

    Bearing in mind that a year or less from now when likely upgraded, the Version A models may seem rather weak in comparison. Apple has always shorted the 13" models in comparison to what they might be, and what the 15" remains; so who knows if they'll ever get with the program and offer discreet graphics in the 13". Nonetheless, with Haswell and so forth it could be that for the same high cost one is then receiving a truly capable computer in power and storage (with some teething problems sorted out, as well)—something by rights it should be right now at the onset.

    But the price of being at the leading edge. With possibly a lot of the gloss of these models having worn off in a year or so.
     

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