Replacement for DVDSP

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by cgbier, Aug 1, 2011.

  1. cgbier macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2011
    #1
    Looks like I'll leave the realms of FCP6 and Snow Leopard in not too distant future. While I'm in love with FCP X meanwhile, one thing that bothers me is that DVDSP and even iDVD are EOL'd.

    I need a DVD authoring app (BD maybe somewhen) ... if possible not from Adobe.

    Any ideas or links?
     
  2. SatyMahajan macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2009
    Location:
    Cambridge, MA
    #2
    I know you mentioned if possible not Adobe, but Encore CS5 is a decent application. I have had good success with it in combination with FCPX. If you don't already have any CS5/CS5.5 products, right now you can get the production premium version for half off, or $849, which is a steal.

    http://www.adobe.com/special/offers.html?promoid=IUAXH
     
  3. ppc_michael Guest

    ppc_michael

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2005
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    #3
    +1 for Adobe Encore. It's really the only other serious authoring tool I've come across lately, especially if you need advanced features like scripting.
     
  4. cgbier thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2011
    #4
    Thanks for the advise. So, Encore is it, huh? I'm working in the edumacational field, so I'd get a good discount on it....

    How's about Toast? Will that enable me to build a custom menu and add chapters?
     
  5. idea_hamster macrumors 65816

    idea_hamster

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2003
    Location:
    NYC, or thereabouts
    #5
    If you get the educational discount, I would strongly -- vehemently, even -- recommend paying more and getting the Master Collection.

    You may not think you have any use for, let's say, Indesign, but having the app is a major step toward using it. For instance, I didn't think I needed it, but now I actually compose all my business correspondence in it because the justification engine is light-years ahead of everything else (it's based on the TeX algorithms, and allows for character resizing -- it's great, and doesn't require dealing with TeX (which I also love, even though it's a bit of a PITA)) and it makes my letters look subtly stunning.

    Perhaps the most valuable aspect of Adobe's awesome educational program (as I understand it -- I assume you're in the US?) is that the license is compatible with full professional work and with upgrade pricing in the future, should your situation change.

    There's a lot more in that package -- it's worth a the price tag.

    JMHO & cheers. :)
     
  6. cgbier thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2011
    #6
    Thanks for idea, Mr. Hamster.

    I do some graphics stuff, but use GIMP, Inkscape and Scribus for that. Meets my needs perfectly well.

    Yes, I live in the USA, but my stuff is paid for by the US taxpayer, and I don't want to spend too much of your money. :eek:
     
  7. idea_hamster macrumors 65816

    idea_hamster

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2003
    Location:
    NYC, or thereabouts
    #7
    Got it -- if you aren't going to be keeping the software as your own, then I suppose there is less incentive.

    Also, as a big fan of supporting libre/gratis software projects -- even if only by expanding the body of work created with them -- I'm glad to see you taking an interest in those graphics programs. That said, keep in mind that even though the justification algorithm in Scribus is almost certainly better than that in word processors, it's not close to Indesign's. So for book-legnth and typography-intensive projects, there's a world of difference, but that may be a rare or non-existant part of your work flow.

    It's also very heartening to hear that you to do your part as a sound steward of the public fisc. Bravo!
     

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