Replacing i5 CPU with i7 in 27" iMac

Discussion in 'iMac' started by boretskymj, Nov 28, 2009.

  1. boretskymj macrumors newbie

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    Nov 28, 2009
    #1
    I ordered the wrong iMac, I thought I upgraded to the i7 when I ordered and when I reviewed the order form I didn't initially see that it was configured with the i5 CPU, now that I have it I know I can go purchase an i7 2.8Ghz chip from NewEgg, but how easy is it to replace the CPU in an iMac. Do I ask the Apple Store or where would I goto for this help?
    :confused::confused::confused:
     
  2. BelowTheBelt macrumors regular

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    Aug 16, 2009
    #2

    Call Apple if the unit has not shipped and ask for the upgrade simple as that.

    If the unit is in transit, call Apple and let them know you will not be signing for it and why it will be coming back to them. Once they see it's on the way back they will ship out the upgraded i7 to you.

    If you have the iMac now and you are under 14 days call them and tell them you require some more speed and need to upgrade, in most cases there will be no restocking fee.

    Just call Apple see what they say as I would not recommend attempting to change it yourself; yeah it can be done but it might be a little tricky and you sure would not want to bust something and be Snafu.
     
  3. 300D macrumors 65816

    300D

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    #3
    Return it within the 14 days and get the one you want.

    Replacing the CPU will void your warranty.
     
  4. MovieCutter macrumors 68040

    MovieCutter

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    #4
    Not to mention the time and money it'll take to do that, even though it's likely next to impossible, will cost you FAR more than $200+ a restocking fee if you have to pay that.
     
  5. RexTraverse macrumors 6502

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    #5
    Likely next to impossible? It's a socketed processor that isn't soldered onto the logic board.

    Time? The iMac glass panel is held on by magnets and the LCD screen is held on by 8 Torx T10 screws. Not exactly a time consuming breakdown.

    Money... maybe. But what the OP is saying is exactly what I plan on doing in about 1.5 years when Intel will be retiring LGA 1156 for their next socket technology. Will get the best processor that will work in the socket at clearance prices.
     
  6. MovieCutter macrumors 68040

    MovieCutter

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    #6
    Good luck with that...:rolleyes:
     
  7. DoFoT9 macrumors P6

    DoFoT9

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    #7
    the only thing that stopped me from doing a custom upgrade was the fact that the upgrade to the i7 from apple was cheaper then buying the CPU from an external source. its very easy to do.
     
  8. RexTraverse macrumors 6502

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    #8
    You've never built a computer or taken apart your Mac before, have you? :cool:
     
  9. 53x12 macrumors 68000

    53x12

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    #9
    What is that suppose to mean? :rolleyes:
     
  10. MovieCutter macrumors 68040

    MovieCutter

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    #10
    I've done more take-aparts and disassemblies of Macs from iMacs to Power Macs to MacBook Pros and Powerbooks, more than I care to remember. I worked for Apple for 3 years, disassembling this and that...I just don't think it's worth the hassle over the $200 to do the upgrade up front. And even for future upgrades, as long as you don't need your warranty, have fun. But again...good luck.

    It means what it says.
     
  11. RexTraverse macrumors 6502

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    #11
    You're making it sound like some big deal when it's really a pretty simple upgrade for anyone who knows even the slightest about what they're doing.

    And, the way you phrase it sounds like the entire warranty is being chucked out the window for replacing the CPU, which isn't true (at least in the US). Yeah... you're probably out of luck getting warranty service on the CPU, but if something happens to another component, I challenge Apple to prove that my swapping the CPU directly caused the SuperDrive to die, the Hard Drive to crash, or the LCD to fail.
     
  12. MovieCutter macrumors 68040

    MovieCutter

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    #12
    Keep telling yourself that. You're opening up a computer in a way it isn't meant to be opened as per the warranty, and replacing a part that is not deemed user replaceable. In my experience, the warranty ends there.
     
  13. 300D macrumors 65816

    300D

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    #13
    It is. "Warranty void if removed" is a pretty clear sign.

    If you submit a claim all they have to do is say you violated your warranty contract by breaking the CPU seal and its 100% void.
     
  14. 53x12 macrumors 68000

    53x12

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    #14


    +1 couldn't agree more.
     
  15. Mintin8 macrumors 6502a

    Mintin8

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    #15
    You can challenge them, but they wont care.
     
  16. 300D macrumors 65816

    300D

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    #16
    Keep telling yourself that. Opening the computer and replacing a part does not in any way alter the warranty. IF you break something in the process or break the CPU seal, THEN its totally void.
     
  17. RexTraverse macrumors 6502

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    #17
    Well duh. That's what I said... the warranty is void on the CPU and obviously if I damaged anything in the process of replacing the CPU. But the warranty is still valid for the other components. Warranty Law in the US protects me there.
     
  18. Techhie macrumors 65816

    Techhie

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    #18
    I love when people think that AppleCare is going to conform to their ideals, when it is actually quite the opposite. Apple reserves the right to repair things at their discretion, based on whether or not they think you tampered with any internal components not considered to be user serviceable. If you change the CPU, they will charge you for any repairs that are needed afterwards, plain and simple. Maybe they wouldn't notice if you threw in the original chip before sending it in, but odds are they ware going to void the warranty if they notice anything amuck on the logic board. You can challenge bureaucracy all you want, but at the end of the day you are just another idiotic customer who thinks he knows what he is talking about.
     
  19. RexTraverse macrumors 6502

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    #19
    I'm not doing anything of the sort. Apple has a legal obligation to prove that something I did to an unrelated component directly caused the damage to a component that I am requesting warranty service on.

    Yes, opening up the case is a risk but a calculated risk if the user knows what they're doing and is willing to accept the consequences if something goes wrong. What I'm seeing is here is just a lot of FUD and doomsday scenarios.
     
  20. MovieCutter macrumors 68040

    MovieCutter

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    #20
    Dude, I worked for Apple. It won't work the way you dream it to be. If they find out you swapped the CPU, they won't cover any other problems...simple as that. I'm just telling you how it is based on my experience WORKING FOR THE COMPANY WHO'S WARRANTY YOU ARE CHALLENGING!!! I'm not telling you you can't or shouldn't do it...I'm just telling you reality in the sense that Apple won't cover your f*** up should it or anything else happen.

    Wrong, wrong WRONG, wrong wrong Wrong WRONG!!! You're asking for trouble kid.
     
  21. DoFoT9 macrumors P6

    DoFoT9

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    #21
    i dont see why this debate has to become all "legal or not legal", its more on morals and the mindset of the person who wants to do it. if they want to change the CPU then they have clearly thought about the implications of their actions and accepted them. if they assume that they are covered by warranty and they are indeed not covered by warranty then they have only themselves to blame.

    personally i think i would try it, especially if future CPU upgrades allow for it (which it looks like they will) and apple supports the CPU. i would probably wait for the warranty to be void first though ;)

    moviecutter: what would happen if say, i upgraded the CPU, then something went wrong (e.g. screen dies, or something unrelated) and i changed the old CPU back. there was no evidence of swapping the CPU. how would that go? is it easy to tell if somebody has modified the computer? :D
     
  22. MovieCutter macrumors 68040

    MovieCutter

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    #22
    That's exactly what I'm saying. If they wanna switch their CPU, go for it. But don't assume that Apple will honor the warranty if you're an idiot in the process. As for whether or not there is evidence of the swap if you put back the original, I don't know. I haven't taken apart one of these yet, and I'd have to ask my buddies at Apple whether there is any way to detect whether the original CPU has been tampered with. I just can't stand the naivity on this board sometimes. "I can do anything I want and Apple is required to honor the warranty as long as I don't break something in the process", well i got news for you bub...if it's not an Apple-recognized USER replaceable part, they don't have to honor squat.
     
  23. DoFoT9 macrumors P6

    DoFoT9

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    #23
    thanks for the reply :) there is nothing i can say to counteract what youve said, because i dont know the rules. so thank you for pointing it out :)

    i imagine that apple are pretty strict on the warranty area :( so the chances of getting away with something like this wouldnt be that high.
     
  24. RexTraverse macrumors 6502

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    #24
    First, you need to relax.

    Second, I don't think anyone here disagrees that if, in the process of an upgrade, that Apple will NOT cover any damage you do to other parts in the process, that Apple will NOT cover the replacement part, or that Apple will NOT cover the part you replaced if it was somehow damaged in the process. That's just common sense and an understood risk.

    Example, if I swap the hard drive in a MacBook Pro, that doesn't mean that my prematurely exploded battery is not covered under warranty. The basis of the naysayers in this thread appears to be "You're gonna royally screw up so don't even try".
     
  25. Techhie macrumors 65816

    Techhie

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    #25
    I think you may be misinterpreting either the AppleCare agreement, or something an employee told you. The warranty is voided if you do something that isn't defined as an end user alteration. If you replace the hard drive in your 2007 non-unibody MacBook Pro and they can tell that you did it, they will NOT fix anything else under warranty, regardless of whether it is related or not. The naysayers on this thread are the wise ones who have seen people like you think they are hot stuff when they go up against a multi-billion dollar corporation, and then get shut down.

    Feel free to replace the CPU (you obviously know what you are talking about), and then come back to us when you have an unrelated problem and Apple refuses to fix it. :rolleyes:
     

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