Reset PRAM - do I need to be fully charged?

Discussion in 'MacBook' started by AeroBar, Sep 15, 2016.

  1. AeroBar macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2009
    #1
    Hello,

    I've noticed that my MacBook battery runs down very quickly. For example, I'm lucky if I get through a 2 hour movie on Netflix and if I use my VPN a 45 minute TV episode can use over 50%. Other Netflix users, and the VPN provider, have told me that this is far from normal.

    I googled the problem and saw that resetting the PRAM is a possible solution.

    I can't find any mention though, of whether my MacBook needs to be plugged in or fully charged or whether it matters either way.

    Can somebody let me know?

    Also, if anyone knows of other possible causes I would be grateful.

    Cheers
     
  2. DeltaMac macrumors 604

    DeltaMac

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2003
    Location:
    Delaware
    #2
    The PRAM reset does not depend on the battery at all, so it could be discharged, fully charged, even missing, and the PRAM reset will still finish.
    That's assuming you are plugged in to your power adapter when you do the reset.
    To answer your question more directly - the condition of the battery does not affect the PRAM reset.

    How old is your MacBook?
    Is your battery in good condition?
    You can see more information about that in your System Information/System Report, then the Power tab.
    What is the "Cycle Count" on your battery?
    Also, what is showing for "Full Charge Capacity"
     
  3. AeroBar thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2009
    #3
    Thanks for responding and the information on the PRAM reset.

    The MacBook is a Mid-2012.
    In the System Report, the Cycle Count is 994 and Condition is Normal.
    Full harge Capacity is 3805.
     
  4. DeltaMac macrumors 604

    DeltaMac

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2003
    Location:
    Delaware
    #4
    Right.
    Your battery is now at approx. 66% of original design capacity (66% health.)
    You are also close to the design number of 1,000 charge cycles.
    Apple uses a health figure of 80% as one of the tests to qualify a battery for replacement.
    That means that you can expect noticeably shorter battery life at that 80% level.
    Yours, at 66%, is well under that - so, if you would like better battery life, replace your battery.
    Some users continue to use their battery well beyond that design life of 1,000 charge cycles, but replacing your battery is really the only way to get that battery life that you expect.
     
  5. AeroBar thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2009
    #5
    Okay, thanks once again for the information and the help.

    I can't afford a new battery at the moment but I'll replace it as soon as I can.

    Can you tell me how you calculated the 66% ?

    Cheers
     
  6. DeltaMac macrumors 604

    DeltaMac

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2003
    Location:
    Delaware
    #6
    Your present Full Charge Capacity is 3805 mAh
    The new (original) Full charge capacity for your battery is about 5750 mAh (you can find this out with a search on the 'net)
    Present (3805) / New (5750) = about 66%
    The Coconut Battery utility will also give you some other information similar to that.
     
  7. Mike Boreham macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2006
    Location:
    UK
    #7
    Have you tried calling Apple and explaining the situation? You are only just outside the 12 months warranty and battery health is well under the normal criteria for replacement. I would not be at all surprised if they replaced it free.

    Your experience might decide me to get Applecare for my one month old MacBook.
     
  8. DeltaMac macrumors 604

    DeltaMac

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2003
    Location:
    Delaware
    #8
    I agree, it's possible that Apple might replace the battery. However, the OP's MBPro is a 2012 model, so might be more than 4 years old, well past even AppleCare extended warranty, although OP didn't say when they purchased the MBPro.
    But, it won't hurt anything to ask. I would anticipate that, barring visible swelling, or other indication of a hazardous condition, that Apple will simply say that a 4-year-old battery is just a normal result of use and age, and probably not a warranty exception.
     
  9. Mike Boreham macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2006
    Location:
    UK
    #9
    You're right I had a brain malfunction and was somehow thinking it a current generation MacBook.
    Four years is not unreasonable, although Apple did once replace a battery for me well outside twelve months. And then they made an error and sent me two! When I told them they just told me to keep both. This was in the days of user changeable of course.
     
  10. AeroBar thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2009
    #10
    Thanks again for the information and help. ;)
    --- Post Merged, Sep 17, 2016 ---
    For a moment there you had me thinking I WAS within my AppleCare period. A brain malfunction of my own. :)

    Thanks for the input anyway. I might actually contact Apple and see what they say. Can't do any harm. The worst it could be is a no. ;)
     

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