Resolution for LCD monitors

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by wildernessbob, Aug 20, 2007.

  1. wildernessbob macrumors member

    wildernessbob

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2006
    Location:
    Pender Island, BC, Canada
    #1
    Hello all knowing peoples,
    I need to buy an LCD monitor, but i'm a bit confused about the whole resolution situ. i'm looking at 22" monitors with resolutions of 1680x1050 but as far as i can tell my powerbook g4 1.67 GHz has a max resolution of 1440x960. is this going to be a problem?
    also, what's the diff between 16:10 and 16:9 aspect ratio. i read somewhere that some monitors will squeeze an image in to fit the aspect ratio. with CAD I can't afford to have any image distortion.
    thyanks,
    wb
     
  2. Aea macrumors 6502a

    Aea

    Joined:
    May 23, 2007
    Location:
    Denver, Colorado
    #2
    22" monitors should definitely have no lower then full HD (1920 x 1080) or else it will look ugly to the vast majority of people. Also, it doesn't matter what (within reason) you plug in, you can have a 30" ACD with it's huge resolution connected to a 1440x900 laptop and OSX will configure the second display to use its native resolution. Nothing to worry about :)
     
  3. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #3
    Your Mac can use an external display in one of two ways: mirroring and spanning. Mirroring means that the two displays show the same thing. This will be limited to the highest commonly possible resolution, and it may result in a distorted picture on one or both displays.

    Spanning means that each display is independent and shows something different. Both displays are free to display at native resolution, and as long as you pick an appropriate resolution, there is no distortion on almost any display.

    Basically, you want to use Spanning. You can purchase a display that uses whatever resolution you want, and then you will get that resolution on the external display and continue to get 1440x960 on the internal display. Neither display will be distorted.

    Does that make sense?
     
  4. wildernessbob thread starter macrumors member

    wildernessbob

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2006
    Location:
    Pender Island, BC, Canada
    #4
     
  5. Aea macrumors 6502a

    Aea

    Joined:
    May 23, 2007
    Location:
    Denver, Colorado
    #5
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...E&N=2010190020 1109909240&bop=And&Order=PRICE

    Granted, not cheap, but 1080p (Full HD) offers 17.5% more "viewable area," and when you get into the larger screen sizes it becomes pretty important.
     
  6. plinden macrumors 68040

    plinden

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2004
    #6
    You won't find any 22" monitors with more than 1680x1050, but there are 24" monitors with 1920x1200 resolution - for instance the Dell 2407WFP
     
  7. Aea macrumors 6502a

    Aea

    Joined:
    May 23, 2007
    Location:
    Denver, Colorado
    #7

    Hmm, you're right. You are right, but 1680 x 1050 seems really small for a 22" screen to me. Guess you have to see it in person.
     
  8. wildernessbob thread starter macrumors member

    wildernessbob

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2006
    Location:
    Pender Island, BC, Canada
    #8
    how is it that 20" and 22" monitors can have the same resolution?
    wb
     
  9. Krevnik macrumors 68040

    Krevnik

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2003
    #9
    Lower density of the pixels (aka DPI).

    So a 22" monitor will have a lower DPI than a 20" monitor of the same resolution. If you are doing graphics work across multiple machines or monitors, getting displays with similar DPI or dot pitch values will help make sure that 1" on one display, is 1" on another.

    I wouldn't worry about distortion/stretching as long as you use the native resolution of the panel.
     

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