Restore action in Terminal?

Discussion in 'macOS' started by Leetah, Mar 29, 2009.

  1. Leetah macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2009
    #1
    Hi!

    I inserted this command in the Terminal> rm -rf /private/var/.elm_cache but with the space after var/ so> rm -rf /private/var/ .elm_cach and now Im experiencing some problems, especially with passwords and accessing accounts settings. Is there anyway I can restore default settings or what can I do?

    Really need help.
     
  2. lostngone macrumors demi-god

    lostngone

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2003
    Location:
    Anchorage
    #2
    Not pretty...

    Do you have any back-ups?

    Did you do this as root or with elevated privileges(sudo)? Looking at my /private/var I don't see much you could hurt as a default user.

    I would say re-install...
     
  3. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2006
    Location:
    The Ivory Tower (I'm not coming down)
    #3
    rm is a very dangerous thing to be using. You'll probably have to reinstall if you don't have a backup to be sure everything is working correctly.
     
  4. RoninXI macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2006
    Location:
    Vermilion, Ohio
    #4
    The only thing I see wrong is rm -rf /private/var/ .elm_cach
    should be rm -rf /private/var/\ .elm_cach
    That forward slash is an escape telling it that the path is not complete keep going it will then keep looking past spaces til it hits the end of the line or a space. Terminal read rm -rf /private/var/ because it reads the space as the end of the path. Think of it this way, when you use the move command
    mv /path/to/file /new/path/to/file
    that space told it "that is the end of the first path, now look for destination path."
     
  5. Cromulent macrumors 603

    Cromulent

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2006
    Location:
    The Land of Hope and Glory
    #5
    Looks like a reinstall is your only option or maybe a backup if you have one. Let it be a lesson not to mess with the Terminal unless you know what you are doing - especially when using the rm -rf command.
     

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