Retina without glossy screen

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by sofianito, Jul 8, 2012.

  1. sofianito macrumors 65816

    sofianito

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    #1
    Although the reflections have been reduced in the retina model, I would still prefer the retina without glossy because I spend more than 8 hours in front of the computer and I cannot control the light conditions. I wonder how crisp would be the retina without the glossy screen, and whether Apple would offer it in the next versions...
     
  2. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #2
    Doubtful, apple spent a lot of time, effort and money to develop the extremely thin display. I don't think they'll want to add another layer to create the matte screen.

    Just look at their other laptop line ups. The MBA and 13" MBPs do not offer a matte screen. I think at this point you'll be waiting fora very long time for a matt screen.
     
  3. terraphantm macrumors 68040

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    #3
    At the pixel density of the retina display, an AG coating might cause some details to be lost. I suspect you'd get all sorts of speckle patterns and other similar artifacts
     
  4. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #4
    Brightness may be another issue. There are complaints now that the retina screen is not as bright as the classic MBP. Adding another coating/layer that will impacts lighting will certainly have a negative impact
     
  5. sofianito thread starter macrumors 65816

    sofianito

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    #5
    I thought the glossy was an extra layer too...

    Maybe an antiglare film would do the job? http://www.radtech.us/Products/ClearCal-Displays.aspx

    Any owner of rMBP wants to try it? :p
     
  6. mark28 macrumors 68000

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    #6
    The matte screens are brighter than then the glossy displays. Maximum brightness on the glossy display ( and also the retina display ) is 3-4 bars below maximum of the Matte screen ( samsung screen atleast ).
     
  7. terraphantm macrumors 68040

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    #7
    Compare two otherwise identical screens, and the glossy will always be brighter. Simple physics.
     
  8. mark28 macrumors 68000

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    #8
    None of the Glossy Macbook Pro were able to match the brightness of my Matte MBP in real life. You people can think of as many reasons why the Glossy screens should be brighter, in real life this is not true. I haven't seen a Glossy MBP in person that was as bright as the screen on my MBP.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  9. terraphantm macrumors 68040

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    #9
    They didn't even test the high res glossy (or any non-retina 15" glossy for that matter). Again, with two otherwise identical panels, the glossy will always be brighter.
     
  10. mark28 macrumors 68000

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    #10
    First of all, glossy screens are not the same as Matte screens, they can't be identical as they have special chemical processing to reduce glare.

    And your statement about Glossy screens is completely false as this has been disproven so many times. I have personally never seen 1 Glossy MBP that has a brighter screen than my MBP.

    If Matte screens were less bright, then there would have been alot of Glossy MBP that have brighter screens, yet all the glossy MBP are more dark. So your hypothesis can't be true.
     
  11. Xian Zhu Xuande macrumors 6502a

    Xian Zhu Xuande

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    #11
    I wouldn't expect any worthwhile increase in 'crispness' between a glossy Retina screen and a matte Retina screen. There's no particularly meaningful technical reason to.

    And for what it's worth, I wouldn't expect it to ever come about from Apple. It would have to be a third-party solution.

    And though unsolicited, as a designer with the RMBP and an industry-loved matte Apple cinema display on my Mac Pro, the level of gloss on the RMBP is the sort of thing which becomes a non-issue for most people as soon as they stop actively thinking of it and start using the laptop to get things done. Unless you're working outside under a changing environment (e.g. under leaves filtering the sun), I suppose.
     
  12. terraphantm, Jul 8, 2012
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2012

    terraphantm macrumors 68040

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    #12
    Take the apple 27" LCD vs the 27" displays offered by NEC, Dell, HP, etc... They all use the same LG panel. But the non-apple displays are matte. Guess which is brighter.

    Find me measurements from a glossy and matte 15" MBP with the high res display. I dont want an apples to oranges comparison. If its been disproven so many times, disprove it.

    And it isn't a "special chemical process" to reduce glare. It's just a coating. It can be removed if you're extremely careful
     
  13. Mal macrumors 603

    Mal

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    #13
    The "glossy" isn't an extra layer on the Retina MacBook Pro. They've simply made the front glass layer of the actual LCD extend all the way to the edges of the frame. All LCD displays have a plastic or glass layer that forms the front of the display, and to make them matte, there's an anti-glare coating that's applied. With the Retina models, there's either still some coating or they've simply used less reflective glass (not 100% sure), but there's no extra layer that makes it glossy.

    BTW, all of those anti-glare films are going to affect the clarity of the display, although the severity will depend on the quality of the film and the care taken while applying it.

    jW
     
  14. GCWB macrumors member

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    #14
    My contribution.

    I had a Mid 2010 Macbook Pro with a Matte Display for 2 years. It was beautiful... I hated the glossiness of the regular MBP for the exact same reasons. I didn't need to see my own face when working.

    Now I have the rMBP (I was precarious to do so as I didn't want the same issues as you, but I took the dive) and it's fine. It's not matte, but it's downright close.

    I must add that I haven't put myself in extreme situations, such as watching a movie sitting in the sun (which in these conditions, may I say, I could see my face with the matte version too). I'm just saying as a previous Matte user that has the same worries as you, I would believe in the glossy rMBP screen's capabilities.

    In fact. It's more of a Satin display. If that makes any sense whatsoever.
     
  15. Pagga macrumors 6502

    Pagga

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    #15
    I wonder what our second world war grandfathers would feel about this definition ...
     
  16. Voodoofreak macrumors regular

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    #16
    rofl!!!!
     
  17. GCWB macrumors member

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    #17
    Hahahaha damn you and your out of context jokes!
    I suppose I should have rephrased that :p
     
  18. wethackrey macrumors 6502

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    #18
    I'm with you. My last several MacBook Pros have been BTO with matte screens. I tried a glossy screen and it was a huge pain trying to orient it so either the window glare or the ceiling lights weren't somewhere in my field of view. Thankfully, when my 17" matte screen MBP was stolen a year ago, the local Apple store had a matte screen in stock. The store manager said "Yeah, the 17" machines are usually purchased by media professionals who demand a matte screen, so I make sure I have at least one in stock."

    Which brings up around to the MBPr. I'm typing this on my new MBPr and I have to say it's impressive. It's sitting here next to my "old" 17" matte screen. The MBPr is just easier on the eyes and the glare is pretty much non-existent. I can maneuver the thing so I can see a window reflection, but I have to work at it. It is really a night and day difference between the retina and the previous glossy screen. At this point, given the chance, I don't think I'd order a matte display instead.
     
  19. Mojo1 macrumors 65816

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    Jul 26, 2011
    #19
    I cannot comment about the utility of adding an anti-glare film to a Retina MBP.

    But when I was getting ready to buy a 13" MBP I researched all the available films. I settled on the $35 Power Support anti-glare film. It is the most expensive that I came across but it also garnered the most favorable professional and user reviews.

    Unlike less expensive films (including the RadTech) the Power Support film does not introduce color-shifts or visible artifacts. I compared my 13" MBP with the film to my early 2008 15" MBP with a matte display. I could not see an appreciable difference between the displays. (I also use the film on an iPad.)

    I like to apply the film as soon as a new MBP is removed from its box; that way I avoid having to clean the display. I had to dab away a few dust specks with the edge of a microfiber cloth. The Power Support film is relatively thick so it is easy to apply; I wound up with zero dust or bubbles under the film. A year later it still looks good as new. No glare or reflections too!
     

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