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Varth Dader

macrumors member
Original poster
Dec 21, 2011
31
13
I've been noticing a good number of people buying both sizes (serially, if not simultaneously) with intent of returning the one that doesn't fit. I've also seen people buy multiple styles with intent to return ones they didn't like.

Since try-ons are now readily available, do you think this will diminish? I get that the initial hours/days of the preorder was somewhat a blind rush, but do you think the ratio of returns is diminishing?

It kills me to think that a good number of us could have our watch if people didn't order without doing the research (like using the measuring guide Apple provided far in advance).

Go try them out folks! :) and take a friend (preferably significant other) so they can say it looks too big or too small! (twss)

And so as to not merely be sour grapes as I wait for mine, I would love to chat about the logistics aspect of returns w/liberal returns policy and impact on fulfilling orders.

Anecdotally I gotta guesstimate the returns ratio as being a good 5-10% which is enormous.
 

Spink10

Suspended
Nov 3, 2011
4,261
1,020
Oklahoma
Ordered a bunch of different watches because Apple was stupid enough to offer try on appointment after preorder. Sold them all for profit. Ended up with a free Apple Watch to keep!
 

Varth Dader

macrumors member
Original poster
Dec 21, 2011
31
13
^this. Can't begrudge the capitalism, kudos. People still got the watches you sold.

More concerned with proper returns because those perfectly good items just disappear forever until there is a refurbishment process in place, which is like a year later for a new product.

----------

(Sorry to post to my own post so early)

For Apple Watch 2 what if they had try-ons, say, a month early before taking preorders, but when preordering, giving preferential treatment for those that have a try-on certificate?
 

za9ra22

macrumors 65816
Sep 25, 2003
1,441
1,898
...More concerned with proper returns because those perfectly good items just disappear forever until there is a refurbishment process in place, which is like a year later for a new product....

They don't 'disappear forever'. If past history is anything to go by, these returns - basically unused watches - will go through inspection and then be sent to Apple stores for exchange stock.

It'll probably take no more than a few months or so before some, along with returned and subsequently refurbished devices, end up being sold online in Apple's refurb store. How many months is largely dependent on when the supply chain has stabilized, and wait times are zero, but it certainly won't take a year.
 

jmh286

macrumors member
Apr 22, 2015
53
21
For Apple Watch 2 what if they had try-ons, say, a month early before taking preorders, but when preordering, giving preferential treatment for those that have a try-on certificate?

That would be kind of unfair to those of us that have to drive pretty far to get to an Apple Store. On top of that, I doubt they would change the size so dramatically that you would require a whole new try-on to find out if it would fit. This was a whole new product line for Apple, thus the confusion.
 

Phoenixx

Suspended
Jul 3, 2015
377
556
I've been noticing a good number of people buying both sizes (serially, if not simultaneously) with intent of returning the one that doesn't fit. I've also seen people buy multiple styles with intent to return ones they didn't like.

It's kind of hard to have any sympathy for Apple if they have a high return rate for the watch, when they effectively refused to allow it to be sold in a wide variety of locations, and people were effectively forced to have to buy a bunch of different watches online, try them out and send back the ones they don't want in order to make a choice.

If an individual wants to know what colour iPad to buy, they go to any of the numerous outlets and have a look, and it would have been much better if Apple had followed the same strategy with the watch.

Apple got the wrong idea about this being a piece of jewellery rather than a piece of wearable tech, they had to get into this ridiculous and slow appointment based approach. I could understand this a bit more with the Edition versions of the watch, maybe even with the more expensive versions of the Apple Watch (stainless steel), but not with the Apple Watch Sport, which can hardly be considered jewellery.
 

maflynn

macrumors Haswell
May 3, 2009
73,575
43,562
I've been noticing a good number of people buying both sizes (serially, if not simultaneously) with intent of returning the one that doesn't fit. I've also seen people buy multiple styles with intent to return ones they didn't like.
That's the downside of apple's return policy, If they charged a restocking fee then perhaps that will slow things down. With that said, people are taking advantage of an apple policy, they are doing nothing wrong, and while I may not go down that path, I'm not necessarily going to be upset by them.

It's kind of hard to have any sympathy for Apple if they have a high return rate for the watch, when they effectively refused to allow it to be sold in a wide variety of locations, and people were effectively forced to have to buy a bunch of different watches online, try them out and send back the ones they don't want in order to make a choice.
The OP is specifically mentioning people buying at a store. Your explanation really doesn't hold water for people walking into an apple store and now they can do these same at a Best Buy.

but not with the Apple Watch Sport, which can hardly be considered jewellery.
I don't know, in the various picture galleries, the space gray with some of the various bands look really nice. I don't think you can issue a blank statement like that. The apple watch (either the SS or sport) is a beautiful watch.
 

Phoenixx

Suspended
Jul 3, 2015
377
556
Your explanation really doesn't hold water for people walking into an apple store and now they can do these same at a Best Buy.

You do realise that there are plenty of places around the world where Apple has decided not to build Apple stores, and where Best Buy does not exist. You also realise that the Space Grey version of the watch, is using the same colour as an iPhone and an iPad. There is not doubt they look nice too, but if you shrink one and strap it to your wrist that hardly makes it jewellery.

I'd suggest you check some facts, before you insult people and tell them their opinion doesn't hold water, that way you won't make yourself look like a fool.
 

maflynn

macrumors Haswell
May 3, 2009
73,575
43,562
You do realise that there are plenty of places around the world where Apple has decided not to build Apple stores, and where Best Buy does not exist
Yes I do, but the OP is asking what he witnessed personally in a store and I was addressing that, not internet sales.
 

Phoenixx

Suspended
Jul 3, 2015
377
556
've been noticing a good number of people buying both sizes (serially, if not simultaneously) with intent of returning the one that doesn't fit. I've also seen people buy multiple styles with intent to return ones they didn't like.

Since try-ons are now readily available, do you think this will diminish? I get that the initial hours/days of the preorder was somewhat a blind rush, but do you think the ratio of returns is diminishing?

No mention of the OP witnessing this in an Apple store, only it being connected to the preorder, which was done online AND in store.
 

maflynn

macrumors Haswell
May 3, 2009
73,575
43,562
For Apple Watch 2 what if they had try-ons, say, a month early before taking preorders, but when preordering, giving preferential treatment for those that have a try-on certificate?
I think supply was the major factor on why people were unable to try them on, plus they thought the appointment process would help keep crowds to a minimum. All in all, though I think the appointment idea was largely a fail.

I wonder if the they'll do anything different for the next gen, to help increase sales.
 

JayLenochiniMac

macrumors G5
Nov 7, 2007
12,819
2,389
New Sanfrakota
Yes I do, but the OP is asking what he witnessed personally in a store and I was addressing that, not internet sales.

The OP was back in May, a time when you couldn't buy any Watch in a store. It was online order only, i.e., people ordering online before or after the fact (seeing them in person or attending the try-on).
 

ckip10

macrumors member
Apr 22, 2013
36
31
Lincoln, Alabama
I was one of those that made a couple of returns before settling on the SS. I imagine Apple thought about this as wearable items have to actually be worn to see if someone likes them or not.
 

Nell

macrumors 6502a
Jun 25, 2012
583
262
London
I bought mine (a 42mm silver sport, fact fans) with the intention of trying it for two weeks and returning it if I thought it wouldn't work for me in the long term. Loved it from the get go so no return was necessary.

I do think the returns rate for the watch could well be unusually high though but I guess we'll probably never really know.
 

kdarling

macrumors P6
I think supply was the major factor on why people were unable to try them on, plus they thought the appointment process would help keep crowds to a minimum. All in all, though I think the appointment idea was largely a fail.

Worse, it was actually a bit annoying.

I walked into an Apple Store right after launch. Nobody looking at Watches at all.

Me: can I try one on?
Staff: you need an appointment.
Me: (looking around) seriously?
Staff: Uh, yeah. But I think we can give you one right away. Just give us your name, email, etc. (And you think Google collects info!)

Plus I knew more about how it worked, than the staff who had just seen them for the first time, the day before.
 

maflynn

macrumors Haswell
May 3, 2009
73,575
43,562
I walked into an Apple Store right after launch. Nobody looking at Watches at all.

Me: can I try one on?
Staff: you need an appointment.
Me: (looking around) seriously?
Staff: Uh, yeah. But I think we can give you one right away. Just give us your name, email, etc. (And you think Google collects info!)

That's ludicrous, I can see apple in their meetings, lets find ways to turn customers away and annoy them.

Thankfully that policy wasn't enforced when I visited the apple store and all I had to do is wait for an available salesman. I did have to give my apple id, and of course I got some survey email after my visit.

I wonder if they'll institute a similar policy when the 6s comes out later this year.
 
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