Review: Eve's Energy Strip Gives You Three HomeKit-Compatible Outlets

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Eve, a company that makes HomeKit-enabled smart home products, launched its latest accessory, the Eve Energy Strip, in April.

The Eve Energy Strip offers three HomeKit-connected outlets, each of which can be controlled independently through the Eve app, the Home app, and through Siri, so you can make standard home products and appliances smart.


Design

Design wise, the Eve Energy Strip feels a bit large and overly thick for a three outlet power strip, but it has an attractive and well-made aluminum enclosure with a black plastic top, so it looks sharp enough that it doesn't need to be hidden away. It measures in at 10.9 inches long, 2.5 inches wide, and 1.3 inches thick.


There are three well-spaced sockets on the Eve Energy Strip, which are placed far enough away that even multiple larger power adapters can fit as long as you're careful with placement. As with most power strips, horizontally oriented power adapters have the potential to block other outlets, depending on position.

There are indicator lights for surge protection and grounding at one end, along with three power buttons and LED status indicators. Each button has one, two, or three dots, corresponding to each of the sockets on the Energy Strip.

There's a thick 6.3-foot black cable at one end, which is about standard for power strips. 6.3 feet is long enough that it can be placed behind a desk or TV stand while remaining accessible for use. With app and Siri controls available for remote access, the Energy Strip does not necessarily need to be put in a fully accessible place.


Standard protections you might expect from a power strip are included, such as overcurrent, overvoltage, and surge protection.

Overall, this is a nice looking power strip that's ideal if it needs to go in a place where it might possibly be visible. I tuck my power strips and cables away in boxes to hide them as best I can, but if I had to have a visible power strip, I'd want a design like this. As I mentioned above, I do wish it were smaller, but there's a lot going on under the hood to justify the size.


Functionality

Each of the three outlets on the Energy Strip is HomeKit-compatible, which means you can add HomeKit connectivity to three devices that wouldn't otherwise be able to be controlled using HomeKit features.

I have a lot of HomeKit devices already so I don't have much that's not already connected to HomeKit, but the Energy Strip is ideal if you have a less connected setup because it offers three outlets in one device. Fans, humidifiers, heaters, fancy lamps, and other appliances that are not normally able to be connected to HomeKit are ideal for this kind of setup.


HomeKit functionality in this case is limited to on and off controls and automation, so that's something to be aware of. You'll be able to power lamps, appliances, or other devices on or off through this Energy Strip using the Home app, Eve app, or HomeKit commands, but there are no other direct control options.


You can add the outlets to HomeKit scenes with other HomeKit products and you can set up automation schedules, so you can do something like have a fan come on at a specific time or turn off a computer at night.

The Energy Strip connects to a HomeKit setup over WiFi, and you're going to need a 2.4GHz network because it won't connect to 5GHz. I had to switch my phone over to 2.4GHz to connect, and that's always a hassle, especially if you don't have your 2.4GHz and 5GHz networks split and easy to connect to. On the plus side, since this is a direct Wi-Fi connection, there's no need for a bridge.


In addition to turning devices off/on and adding automation controls, the major feature the Energy Strip boasts is power monitoring. You can tell exactly how much power your devices are consuming, their estimated total cost, and an estimate of how much it will cost to run your devices over a period of a year.

The power consumption and cost estimate metrics are for the entire Eve Energy strip, so you cannot see a breakdown for each outlet.

Eve App

The Eve app offers full control over the Energy Strip, allowing you to change its name, assign names to each plug for Siri voice control purposes, and turn outlets on and off, but what you're going to want to use the Eve app for primarily is checking on those above mentioned in-app metrics, because that info is not available through the Home app or via Siri commands.


In the Eve app, you can see power status (aka if an outlet is on or off), current consumption (energy being drawn right now), total consumption (energy draw over time), projected cost (what it might cost to run for a year based on the last week, day or minute), and total cost (the total estimated cost of energy use to date).


There is, unfortunately, no way to break down energy usage on a per outlet basis, with the Eve app calculating these figures based on the entire energy draw of all of your items that are plugged in.


You can see total consumption broken down further by hour, day, week, or month, and export power usage measurements from each day into another app if you like.


The total cost estimate can also be broken down by hour, day, week, and month so you can see your projected cost estimates in the way that makes the most sense to you.

My Eve app estimates a lamp and a computer have cost me $0.14 over the course of the last week or so, and will cost somewhere around $16 to run for the entire year. These totals are calculated on a projected cost per country and can be customized in the Eve app's settings.


Cost per kilowatt hour varies by location, so you will want to customize this setting. Here in California, we pay somewhere around 19.82 cents per kilowatt hour, while in other states, that rate is much lower.

Home App

When it comes to the Eve Energy strip, Home app controls are limited. You can turn each individual outlet on or off using in-app toggles, but that's just about all you can do.

You can also rename outlets, change their room, change what they identify as, and do other similar management things, but you can't see power usage.


In both the Home app and the Eve app, you can automate the outlets to come on at a specific time and incorporate them into HomeKit scenes with other HomeKit products.

Siri

Siri controls are limited to turning each individual outlet on or off and getting the power status, aka if a particular outlet is turned on or off.

Bottom Line

If you have a few non-HomeKit devices that you've been wanting to hook up to your smart home setup, the Eve Energy Strip is a good way to do it.

It's also useful if you want to make sure a particular appliance isn't drawing too much energy or using energy when it's off, making it ideal for suspect appliances like fans, computers, and more.


Being able to control each outlet individually in HomeKit is useful, because you can turn off one item that's plugged in without affecting the others, something not usually possible with a standard power strip.

The Eve Energy Strip is expensive and is going to cost more than individual HomeKit-enabled smart plugs, but it is one of the few HomeKit-enabled power strip options on the market.

How to Buy

The Eve Energy Strip can be purchased from Amazon for $99.95.

Article Link: Review: Eve's Energy Strip Gives You Three HomeKit-Compatible Outlets
 

walstib

macrumors member
Jul 5, 2007
30
58
0
Carpinteria, California
Looks like a neat product, but I have been so disappointed with the performance of previous Eve products — sensors, motion detectors, and their button — that I hesitate to buy anything else they make.
 
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jclo

Editor
Staff member
Dec 7, 2012
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2,840
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California
Looks like a neat product, but I have been so disappointed with the performance of previous Eve products — sensors, motion detectors, and their button — that I hesitate to buy anything else they make.
I haven't tested the motion detectors, but I have the Eve Flare, Light Strip, and a few of the temperature sensors that consistently work well for me. I think some of the Bluetooth devices are problematic in homes without a lot of Apple products/HomeKit devices because of range issues, but the WiFi devices don't have that problem (this one is WiFi). I haven't run into any problems with the Energy Strip at all during the last two weeks, but it can always vary with different home setups.
 
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LogicalApex

macrumors 6502
Nov 13, 2015
494
434
0
This is a deal breaker for me, especially at $100 price tag.
Yeah this is the most shocking omission. The Siri control is neat, but the real value of smart outlets is being able to get a very detailed and accurate picture of power consumption. Savings yielded is where you can have a positive ROI on these devices.
 

aggiesrwe03

macrumors regular
Jan 25, 2009
188
10
0
TEXAS
Wemo smart mini is $16 on Amazon right now you can buy 6 of them for the price of this power strip... These smart outlet devices are getting cheaper everyday Eve missed the mark with a $100 price point... I'd be in it at $50
 

Arbuthnott

macrumors member
Jul 4, 2008
86
83
0



Eve, a company that makes HomeKit-enabled smart home products, launched its latest accessory, the Eve Energy Strip, in April.

The Eve Energy Strip offers three HomeKit-connected outlets, each of which can be controlled independently through the Eve app, the Home app, and through Siri, so you can make standard home products and appliances smart.


Design

Design wise, the Eve Energy Strip feels a bit large and overly thick for a three outlet power strip, but it has an attractive and well-made aluminum enclosure with a black plastic top, so it looks sharp enough that it doesn't need to be hidden away. It measures in at 10.9 inches long, 2.5 inches wide, and 1.3 inches thick.


There are three well-spaced sockets on the Eve Energy Strip, which are placed far enough away that even multiple larger power adapters can fit as long as you're careful with placement. As with most power strips, horizontally oriented power adapters have the potential to block other outlets, depending on position.

There are indicator lights for surge protection and grounding at one end, along with three power buttons and LED status indicators. Each button has one, two, or three dots, corresponding to each of the sockets on the Energy Strip.

There's a thick 6.3-foot black cable at one end, which is about standard for power strips. 6.3 feet is long enough that it can be placed behind a desk or TV stand while remaining accessible for use. With app and Siri controls available for remote access, the Energy Strip does not necessarily need to be put in a fully accessible place.


Standard protections you might expect from a power strip are included, such as overcurrent, overvoltage, and surge protection.

Overall, this is a nice looking power strip that's ideal if it needs to go in a place where it might possibly be visible. I tuck my power strips and cables away in boxes to hide them as best I can, but if I had to have a visible power strip, I'd want a design like this. As I mentioned above, I do wish it were smaller, but there's a lot going on under the hood to justify the size.


Functionality

Each of the three outlets on the Energy Strip is HomeKit-compatible, which means you can add HomeKit connectivity to three devices that wouldn't otherwise be able to be controlled using HomeKit features.

I have a lot of HomeKit devices already so I don't have much that's not already connected to HomeKit, but the Energy Strip is ideal if you have a less connected setup because it offers three outlets in one device. Fans, humidifiers, heaters, fancy lamps, and other appliances that are not normally able to be connected to HomeKit are ideal for this kind of setup.


HomeKit functionality in this case is limited to on and off controls and automation, so that's something to be aware of. You'll be able to power lamps, appliances, or other devices on or off through this Energy Strip using the Home app, Eve app, or HomeKit commands, but there are no other direct control options.


You can add the outlets to HomeKit scenes with other HomeKit products and you can set up automation schedules, so you can do something like have a fan come on at a specific time or turn off a computer at night.

The Energy Strip connects to a HomeKit setup over WiFi, and you're going to need a 2.4GHz network because it won't connect to 5GHz. I had to switch my phone over to 2.4GHz to connect, and that's always a hassle, especially if you don't have your 2.4GHz and 5GHz networks split and easy to connect to. On the plus side, since this is a direct Wi-Fi connection, there's no need for a bridge.


In addition to turning devices off/on and adding automation controls, the major feature the Energy Strip boasts is power monitoring. You can tell exactly how much power your devices are consuming, their estimated total cost, and an estimate of how much it will cost to run your devices over a period of a year.

The power consumption and cost estimate metrics are for the entire Eve Energy strip, so you cannot see a breakdown for each outlet.

Eve App

The Eve app offers full control over the Energy Strip, allowing you to change its name, assign names to each plug for Siri voice control purposes, and turn outlets on and off, but what you're going to want to use the Eve app for primarily is checking on those above mentioned in-app metrics, because that info is not available through the Home app or via Siri commands.


In the Eve app, you can see power status (aka if an outlet is on or off), current consumption (energy being drawn right now), total consumption (energy draw over time), projected cost (what it might cost to run for a year based on the last week, day or minute), and total cost (the total estimated cost of energy use to date).


There is, unfortunately, no way to break down energy usage on a per outlet basis, with the Eve app calculating these figures based on the entire energy draw of all of your items that are plugged in.


You can see total consumption broken down further by hour, day, week, or month, and export power usage measurements from each day into another app if you like.


The total cost estimate can also be broken down by hour, day, week, and month so you can see your projected cost estimates in the way that makes the most sense to you.

My Eve app estimates a lamp and a computer have cost me $0.14 over the course of the last week or so, and will cost somewhere around $16 to run for the entire year. These totals are calculated on a projected cost per country and can be customized in the Eve app's settings.


Cost per kilowatt hour varies by location, so you will want to customize this setting. Here in California, we pay somewhere around 19.82 cents per kilowatt hour, while in other states, that rate is much lower.

Home App

When it comes to the Eve Energy strip, Home app controls are limited. You can turn each individual outlet on or off using in-app toggles, but that's just about all you can do.

You can also rename outlets, change their room, change what they identify as, and do other similar management things, but you can't see power usage.


In both the Home app and the Eve app, you can automate the outlets to come on at a specific time and incorporate them into HomeKit scenes with other HomeKit products.

Siri

Siri controls are limited to turning each individual outlet on or off and getting the power status, aka if a particular outlet is turned on or off.

Bottom Line

If you have a few non-HomeKit devices that you've been wanting to hook up to your smart home setup, the Eve Energy Strip is a good way to do it.

It's also useful if you want to make sure a particular appliance isn't drawing too much energy or using energy when it's off, making it ideal for suspect appliances like fans, computers, and more.


Being able to control each outlet individually in HomeKit is useful, because you can turn off one item that's plugged in without affecting the others, something not usually possible with a standard power strip.

The Eve Energy Strip is expensive and is going to cost more than individual HomeKit-enabled smart plugs, but it is one of the few HomeKit-enabled power strip options on the market.

How to Buy

The Eve Energy Strip can be purchased from Amazon for $99.95.

Article Link: Review: Eve's Energy Strip Gives You Three HomeKit-Compatible Outlets
I discovered to my great disappointment that the Eve power plugs do not link by WiFi. If out of range of Bluetooth they don’t work with HomeKit. This is a bit of a surprise, and even more so that it is not mentioned in Eve’s documentation, nor in this review.

If this power strip is similarly limited, then its usefulness is somewhat restricted.

In my view, a definite don’t buy unless it is for use very close to a Bluetooth hub of some sort.
 

Ant2369

macrumors regular
Jul 20, 2011
104
87
0
Connecticut
Wemo smart mini is $16 on Amazon right now you can buy 6 of them for the price of this power strip... These smart outlet devices are getting cheaper everyday Eve missed the mark with a $100 price point... I'd be in it at $50

I agree $50 is a much more realistic price point. I have an eve switch and it’s got quite the delay when turning lights on and off
 
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Jimmy James

macrumors 601
Oct 26, 2008
4,513
2,819
0
Magicland
Tired of basic items with wireless functionality having a huge price tag. Seems opportunistic. Avoiding that whole market.
 

nutmac

macrumors 601
Mar 30, 2004
4,150
2,009
0
Wemo smart mini is $16 on Amazon right now you can buy 6 of them for the price of this power strip... These smart outlet devices are getting cheaper everyday Eve missed the mark with a $100 price point... I'd be in it at $50
I use WeMo Mini myself but getting 3 of them isn't exactly the same as getting Eve Energy Strip.

WeMo lacks:
  • Energy monitoring
  • Surge protection
  • Indicator lights for surge and ground
  • Not a power strip
If Eve Energy Strip had per outlet energy monitoring, I would be okay with $100. Koogeek sells a HomeKit power strip similar to Eve, but discounted to about $60. Very similar feature set, but with 3 USB-A connectors (only outlets are HomeKit) and without surge and ground indicator lights.
[doublepost=1557355926][/doublepost]
I discovered to my great disappointment that the Eve power plugs do not link by WiFi. If out of range of Bluetooth they don’t work with HomeKit. This is a bit of a surprise, and even more so that it is not mentioned in Eve’s documentation, nor in this review.

If this power strip is similarly limited, then its usefulness is somewhat restricted.

In my view, a definite don’t buy unless it is for use very close to a Bluetooth hub of some sort.
As indicator on the review, Eve Energy strip uses Wi-Fi for more immediate response.
 

Hatul

macrumors newbie
May 9, 2019
2
0
0
Whats the point with a surge protector if Eve does not stand behind it. They clearly stated on their amazon listing that they do not guarantee anything but the energy strip itself. Any damage caused to a connected device or and damage caused by a strip failure is not their responsibility. THEY MUST BE KIDDING !
Also as for metering. An interesting experiment is to connect an eve energy between the wall and the energy strip and to realize that in fact the measure quite different consumption! How can you trust this device !?!?
I’m returning mine. Can’t believe I was so dumb to pay 100$ for this.
 

H3LL5P4WN

macrumors 68020
Jun 19, 2010
2,181
2,163
0
Pittsburgh PA
Joule rating? Insurance coverage for devices connected to it?

These are kind of important considerations for a surge protector.
 

Onelifenofear

macrumors regular
Feb 20, 2019
132
217
0
London
So what use are smart sockets? What would people use them for?

A table lamp? Hue / smart bulb is a better idea
Computer? Sure you could switch one on if you set it up right but they don’t like having plug pulled.

Seriously I have no idea what use these have. The smarts need to be in the device and it it needs to be powered on all the time.
 

BaracksPhallusPalace

macrumors member
Apr 3, 2017
66
148
0
Wemo smart mini is $16 on Amazon right now you can buy 6 of them for the price of this power strip... These smart outlet devices are getting cheaper everyday Eve missed the mark with a $100 price point... I'd be in it at $50
The difference between those products and the Eve stuff is that the Eve devices work via Bluetooth with your Homehub once setup. I believe the Wemo devices work entirely over WiFi, and that has it's own set of issues. Coming from my own experience, nearly all of the WiFi only HomeKit devices suck, and they expose your home network to the internet which many people such as myself aren't really comfortable with.
 

CarlJ

macrumors 68030
Feb 23, 2004
2,967
4,507
0
San Diego, CA, USA
I find it a little odd that the review of a power strip doesn't address two key factors of a power strip:

1. What is the maximum rated load (amps/watts) - important for something the article suggests using to control heaters and such.

2. For a power strip offering surge suppression and such - for $100 - is there any provision for replacing the actual surge suppression parts, or is this power strip considered disposable if it gets any sort of overload situation? I'm running a couple of iDevices Switch units, which are plugged into high-end TrippLite surge suppressors - if the surge suppressors do their job, the Switches will be protected. This Eve unit commingles these two separate functions, so it appears it would all have to be replaced.