Become a MacRumors Supporter for $50/year with no ads, ability to filter front page stories, and private forums.

MacRumors

macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
63,855
31,392


Several months ago, Hyper introduced a series of accessories under the "HyperDrive Next" family, bringing a variety of options for USB-C hubs and other products. I've recently spent some time testing out some of these accessories, and I've found them to offer an assortment of capabilities across price points to suit a variety of users.

hyper-usb-hubs-ssd.jpg

USB4 NVMe SSD Enclosure

Priced at $119.99, Hyper's USB4 NVMe SSD Enclosure offers support for a speedy external drive inside a robust aluminum enclosure protected by a silicone bumper to cushion against impacts and provide IP55 dust and water resistance. The enclosure supports M.2 NVMe PCIe Gen 4/3 SSDs up to 16 TB with a snap-in installation process that requires no screws. SSDs in 2230/2240/2260/2280 sizes are supported.

hyper-ssd-enclosure-parts.jpg

For testing, I paired Hyper's enclosure with a 2TB WD_BLACK SSD that supports up to 7,300 MB/s transfer speeds, allowing me to push the enclosure to its limits without being capped by the SSD. The installation process was as simple as advertised, and all I had to do was pop open the enclosure by hand, slide the SSD into the drive slot, secure it with a rubber secure grip, peel off the protective film on a preinstalled thermal pad, and close everything back up. An extra thermal pad and secure grips are provided in the box in case you need them.

hyper-ssd-enclosure-open.jpg

A 0.5-meter USB4 cable is included with the enclosure, and upon plugging the enclosure in to my MacBook Pro, I was able to quickly format it for APFS with Disk Utility to work with macOS. An illuminated Hyper logo on the enclosure shines through an opening in the silicone bumper, giving you some information about drive status. The logo shines a steady white when the enclosure is powered on and the drive is idle, and it blinks while data is being read from or written to the SSD. The logo will blink red if detects an SSD is not connected.

Hyper says the enclosure supports up to 3,800 MB/s transfer speeds, and in my testing with a 16-inch M1 Pro MacBook Pro I saw both read and write speeds registering around 3,100 MB/s with the WD SSD. That's plenty fast for most users, allowing for fast file transfers and even the ability to work with large projects directly from the external drive. I was able to copy a ~28 GB folder with roughly 17,500 items in it to the drive in around 15 seconds.

hyper-ssd-speed-test.jpg

The enclosure gets slightly warm even when not in active use, with the finned aluminum design of the enclosure and small Hyper logo-shaped holes in the silicone bumper helping move heat away from the drive. The heat was not a concern in any of my testing, as it remained comfortable to touch.

Overall, I was pleased with the performance of the enclosure, and it's a convenient solution for backing up data or just adding extra storage. At $119.99 before adding in the cost of the SSD itself, it's pricier than some other solutions, but when you consider the higher-end specs it offers, it's within the same price range as many other options from trusted brands.

Hyper is currently sold out of the SSD enclosure on its own site, but does have it available through Amazon.

10 Port USB-C Hub

At the low end of Hyper's USB hub range is the 10 Port USB-C Hub priced at $99.99. It includes support for a single external display at 4K60Hz over HDMI while offering a pair of 10 Gbps USB-C ports, two USB-A ports (one at 10 Gbps and one at 5 Gbps), SD and microSD 4.0 card slots supporting up to a theoretical maximum of 312 MB/s, Gigabit Ethernet, and a 3.5 mm combo audio jack.

hyper-10-port-usb-hub-front.jpg

There's also a USB-C port with PD support at up to 140 watts, allowing for passthrough power to your computer if you hook up an external power adapter. Otherwise, the hub will run in bus-powered mode off of your computer. The hub connects to the attached computer over an integrated USB-C cable, which ensures you always have the proper cable with you but introduces a potential failure point for the whole accessory. The cable does feel fairly thick and sturdy with some strain relief reinforcement around where it enters the hub, so hopefully it will remain durable over the long term.

This is a compact, lightweight (97 grams) hub in a very dark gray or almost midnight aluminum finish, and in my testing it's proven to be a solid option for on-the-go use cases. It slips easily into a computer bag or sleeve and offers a really nice selection of ports to help you make use of a wide variety of accessories you might run across.

hyper-10-port-usb-hub-rear.jpg

With support for a single external display, this may not be for true power users, but the vast majority of people are likely to only need to connect to a single display, especially in travel environments where this hub excels. A more powerful dock with additional display support and even more ports would likely suit these users better at more fixed home and office locations.

Hyper is currently sold out of the 10 Port USB-C Hub on its own site, but it is available through Amazon and Best Buy.

Dual 4K HDMI 7 Port USB-C Hub

Hyper's mid-range Dual 4K HDMI 7 Port USB-C Hub priced at $149.99 offers fewer ports than the lower-end model but with enhanced display support. It includes two HDMI ports (one HDMI 2.0 at 4K60Hz and one HDMI 1.4 at 4K30Hz), a pair of 10 Gbps USB-C 3.2 Gen 2 ports, a single 10 Gbps USB-A port, a 3.5mm combo audio jack, and a USB-C port allowing you to optio... Click here to read rest of article

Article Link: Review: Hyper's USB Hubs and SSD Enclosure Offer an Array of Connectivity Options
 
  • Like
Reactions: hovscorpion12

LavaLevel

macrumors member
Feb 26, 2024
46
114
Those look really great for on the go for a notebook!

For Mac mini you just can't beat the form factor of Qwiizlab's hub. It gives you 3 USB 1 USBC 1 storage & mini storage card slots, plus an optional USB to power for charging and finally NVMe SSD *and* SATA SSDs

Coming from a Mac Mini (2012!) physical drive, none of the drive speeds really matter to me. It all seems so amazingly fast from over a decade ago!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Justin Cymbal

Populus

macrumors 601
Aug 24, 2012
4,912
7,194
Spain, Europe
That SSD enclosure looks pretty good! A bit bigger than what I’d like, but it seems good quality and with good heat dissipation.

However, it’s a bit expensive at $120 and not sold on Europe yet.

Anyways, it’s a good purchase if you’re getting an SSD before they rise their prices. I already have four Samsung T5/T7 SSDs: 512GB, 1TB SSD, 2TB and a T7 Shield of 4TB. And I think I have enough storage for now…
 

bodhisattva

macrumors 6502
Dec 7, 2008
271
421
So many of these on the market, it's difficult to know which are quality and which are quick production to make a buck. I love when I take a chance and the product turns out to be incredible.
 

tomchr9

macrumors member
Apr 10, 2024
36
61
Maybe an outlier case, but I have been looking for an USB-C hub/dock that includes a serial port. No luck:(
 

bzgnyc2

macrumors regular
Dec 8, 2023
120
146
Does anyone know if these new USB4 NVMe SSD enclosures present the NVMe drive natively to the host or as a USB device? In particular is the device's SMART status visible to the host?

I believe most TB3 enclosures present the NVMe drive basically natively meaning the drive can be managed same as if it was mounted internally and as such SMART status comes across.

However, I understand that USB3 and below enclosures present under a USB protocol such that getting SMART status and similar is nonstandard and varies by the enclosure's chipset (meaning no builting MacOS support and unlikely 3rd party support).

However, unclear to me about USB4 -- as the seeming merger of Thunderbolt 3 and USB3 -- is it presenting NVMe drives natively like Thunderbolt 3 or like a generic USB storage device?
 

bzgnyc2

macrumors regular
Dec 8, 2023
120
146
Maybe an outlier case, but I have been looking for an USB-C hub/dock that includes a serial port. No luck:(

Serial port as in RS-232 (RS-422/485/etc)? As much as I appreciated their simplicitly, I haven't seen one of those in a while. I suspect you're stuck using a regular USB hub/dock with a USB<->serial dongle...
 

tomchr9

macrumors member
Apr 10, 2024
36
61
Serial port as in RS-232 (RS-422/485/etc)? As much as I appreciated their simplicitly, I haven't seen one of those in a while. I suspect you're stuck using a regular USB hub/dock with a USB<->serial dongle...
Yep, I know these are old, but it would be nice to have an RS-232 serial port included, since I need it to connect to some old equipment.
 

jayducharme

macrumors 601
Jun 22, 2006
4,550
6,104
The thick of it
I like the SSD enclosures and would love to replace my 16 tb standard hard drive. But SSDs are still priced higher than some entire computer systems.
 

HDFan

Contributor
Jun 30, 2007
6,700
2,927
2TB WD_BLACK SSD that supports up to 7,300 MB/s transfer speeds,

Which one is that? Couldn't find on the WD website.
 

Greybeard2017

macrumors member
Dec 7, 2020
58
84
2TB WD_BLACK SSD that supports up to 7,300 MB/s transfer speeds,

Which one is that? Couldn't find on the WD website.

Take advantage of irrational PCIe Gen4 NVMe speeds up to 7,300MB/s2 read and 6,600MB/s2 write (2TB1 and 4TB models)

Although as those speeds are irrational they might not be achievable in practice
 
  • Like
Reactions: HDFan

Ifti

macrumors 68040
Dec 14, 2010
3,943
2,449
UK
So what exactly is new here?
The market is flooded with similar hubs already, as it is with SSD enclosures as well. The Hyper enclosure actually looks a far bit larger then others I've used in the past too, but you'll get the same performance from others already on the market - the OWC 1M2 is a similar size, but incorporates a huge heatsink for better heat dissipation too, still making it my Go To SSD enclosure when it comes to desktop use and speed.....
 

Ifti

macrumors 68040
Dec 14, 2010
3,943
2,449
UK

Take advantage of irrational PCIe Gen4 NVMe speeds up to 7,300MB/s2 read and 6,600MB/s2 write (2TB1 and 4TB models)

Although as those speeds are irrational they might not be achievable in practice

They couldn't have tested with this drive - the drive comes with a built on heatsink already, hence wouldn't fit in the mentioned enclosure in the first instance......well, not if you want to close it at least! lol

I believe the standard SN850 (without built on heatsink) is up to 7000MB/s.

Either way, you'll never get anywhere near these speeds through any current external enclosure anyways.
 

pksv

macrumors member
Mar 12, 2024
90
145
SSD enclosure: OUT OF STOCK
and it's been like that for a long time. Can you get some info on when it will be back in stock?

So what exactly is new here?
The market is flooded with similar hubs already, as it is with SSD enclosures as well. The Hyper enclosure actually looks a far bit larger then others I've used in the past too, but you'll get the same performance from others already on the market - the OWC 1M2 is a similar size, but incorporates a huge heatsink for better heat dissipation too, still making it my Go To SSD enclosure when it comes to desktop use and speed.....
New is that it's USB4/TB4 with ASM2426PD chip. When you compare it to other USB4/TB4 cases with the same chip you'll see that sizes are very similar. What is good about this one is that it's silent, well built, toolless, and has a built-it heatsink it fins as a top case.
 

Kyle Andrew

macrumors newbie
Oct 18, 2018
11
14
Can anyone clarify? The amazon listing suggests a maximum sized SSD of 4TB but the article states 16TB.
 

Michael4Mac

macrumors newbie
Dec 13, 2022
5
0
SSD enclosure: OUT OF STOCK
and it's been like that for a long time. Can you get some info on when it will be back in stock?


New is that it's USB4/TB4 with ASM2426PD chip. When you compare it to other USB4/TB4 cases with the same chip you'll see that sizes are very similar. What is good about this one is that it's silent, well built, toolless, and has a built-it heatsink it fins as a top case.
Does USB4 mean that Thunderbolt4 is automatically supported? I am trying to make sense of the statement that "... testing with a 16-inch M1 Pro MacBook Pro I saw both read and write speeds registering around 3,100 MB/s..." since my understanding is that the MacBook Pro line is limited to 10Gb/sec with USB, which means that 1,250 MB/s is the theoretical maximum (3,100 MB/s is about 24.8 Gb/s, against a theoretical 10 GB/s limit for USB and 40 GB/s limit for T3 and T4).
 

Ifti

macrumors 68040
Dec 14, 2010
3,943
2,449
UK
Can anyone clarify? The amazon listing suggests a maximum sized SSD of 4TB but the article states 16TB.

Its 4TB.
2260 and smaller sized NVMe SSDs aren't available in 16TB yet as far as I'm aware - I've seen 8TB but the price is too high and availability too low......
 

bigmadwolf

macrumors newbie
Apr 25, 2024
1
0
Does USB4 mean that Thunderbolt4 is automatically supported? I am trying to make sense of the statement that "... testing with a 16-inch M1 Pro MacBook Pro I saw both read and write speeds registering around 3,100 MB/s..." since my understanding is that the MacBook Pro line is limited to 10Gb/sec with USB, which means that 1,250 MB/s is the theoretical maximum (3,100 MB/s is about 24.8 Gb/s, against a theoretical 10 GB/s limit for USB and 40 GB/s limit for T3 and T4).
I have a Jeyi brand enclosure that uses the ASM2464 chip and the SSD shows up as attached via PCI-E. Performance is great. Have a Kioxia SSD in there. Link speed reported as 40 GB/s. Have it daisy chained into a Thunderbolt 3 dock at the moment.

1714049961138.png
1714049971486.png
 
Last edited:
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.