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I often work away from home, and occasionally abroad, so I'm always looking for ways to slim down the number of chargers and cables I need to pack alongside my 13-inch MacBook Pro to see me through the trip. I've used global travel adapters with USB ports in the past, but nothing quite like Zendure's just-launched Passport II Pro, which I've been trying out at home for a few weeks now.

zendure-passport-ii-pro.jpg

This 61-watt GaN USB-C travel adapter is an evolution of Zendure's popular Passport, the world's first travel adapter with an auto-resetting fuse. That device was followed by the 30-watt Passport Pro, which introduced GaN technology and the ability to charge a tablet and an additional four devices.

The Passport II Pro goes one better, however, as it's the world's first 61-watt GaN travel adapter with 5-USB ports and an auto-resetting fuse. Judging by Zendure's highly successful Kickstarter campaign, this adapter is drawing a lot of interest, so let's take a closer look at what it can do.

Features

The first thing that caught my eye about the Passport II Pro was the side-mounted 61-watt USB-C port, which packs enough power to charge a 13-inch MacBook Pro. Apple's charging plugs have never been particularly compact, but the UK variant that comes with the 13-inch MacBook Pro is particularly bulky and not a great shape to pack.

zendure-passport-ii-pro-apple-mb-charger.jpg

By contrast, the Passport II Pro is more compact and several grams lighter than the Apple UK plug (170 grams versus 225 grams). That's thanks to Zendure's use of GaN technology, which means the adapter can deliver enough power to a notebook without increasing bulk. (Zendure claims a 20 percent reduction in size compared to the Passport GO, although it is a few grams heavier.)

Aside from the 61-watt USB-C port, there are 3x USB-A ports (12 watts) and an additional USB-C port (also 12 watts) on the bottom of the adapter, so that's five ports in all. When all the ports are used together, the 61-watt USB-C port drops to 45-watts output, and the other USB ports drop to 12 watts in total.

zendure-passport-ii-pro-ports.jpg

The adapter's slot-loading plug is compatible with sockets in over 200 countries, including the US, UK, Europe, Canada, Japan, Mexico, Asia, the Middle East, and more.

Meanwhile the adapter's front-facing plug slots offer the same compatibility and let you charge a sixth device. They're also protected by a child-proof shield to prevent them from sticking stuff into the socket. You can insert three-prong plugs into the PassPort Pro II, but the middle plug won't be grounded. It also works with polarized plugs, but Zendure says to make sure the device is double-insulated before doing so.

zendure-passport-ii-pro-uk-plug.jpg

The Passport II Pro doesn't convert voltages up or down, but most modern electronics have no problems running between 100V and 250V, and I had no issues with anything I plugged into it. That said, always check before connecting something.

The auto-resetting fuse cuts power to connected devices in the event of a power surge, and then reactivates within a minute to continue charging. The fuse has also been increased to 10 amps, where previous adapters had just 6 amps, so it's able to power many high-power devices like hairdryers and electric kettles.

Design and Performance

The build quality of the Passport II Pro is nice and solid, and feels like it would stand up well to knocks when stowed. I also found the sliders that switch out the slot-loading plug pins easy to use.

zendure-passport-ii-pro-macbook-charger.jpg

Extending more than one combination of pins out is impossible by design, as you can't move the sliders if one set of pins is already protruding. You also have to press down on the sliders slightly to get them moving, so they stay securely stowed inside the adapter chassis when not in use.

The front-facing socket holes accepted all the plug types I tried inserting, and I didn't have to force any of them in to get past the child-proof shield, which isn't something that can be said for other universal plug adapters I've used.

zendure-passport-pro-2.jpg

The size and shape of the adapter makes it easy to plug and remove from sockets, and it's much more amenable to packing than the Apple 13-inch MacBook charger, which I think is a big win.

It's a shame the same can't be said for the row of USB ports on the bottom of the chassis. When used with a U.K. socket, the location of these ports can make plugging in USB cables difficult without completely unplugging the adapter, and the tiny LED that indicates USB charging status isn't really visible. Other travel adapters mount USB ports along the top, making them easier to work with, at least when I've used them at home. Your experience may differ depending on the region and socket standard.

Using the Power Delivery port on its own, I was able to fully charge my 2020 13-inch MacBook Pro in a little over two hours, which is the same speed I can get from Apple's charger. This time increased to just over three hours when I also plugged in a 12.9-inch iPad Pro, Apple Watch, AirPods Pro, Sony WH-1000XM3 headphones and an iPhone 11 Pro all at the same time, which is pretty impressive. When I stopped using the Power Delivery port, the surplus power was redistributed to the other USB ports and all the accessories I had plugged in got an expected charging boost.

Summing Up

The Passport II Pro is a well-engineered evolution of Zendure's earlier products, and charged everything I threw at it at home, 13-inch MacBook Pro included, without breaking a sweat. Apart from the underside location of four of the available five USB ports, there's very little not to like here.

The GaN charging is a boon, the "Press and Slide" one-handed operation works well, the mix of USB-C and USB-A ports offers flexibility, and it's all housed in a compact and ergonomic industrial design. Altogether, the Zendure Passport is the best travel adapter I've used so far, and I'm looking forward to taking it abroad with me when that becomes possible again.

Passport-II-Pro1200x1200-2.jpg

How to Buy

The Zendure Passport II Pro is already being mass produced and scheduled to ship next month. The adapter is available in black or white, and can be pre-ordered on the Kickstarter page for $45, which includes a 35 percent discount off the retail price, after which it will be available to buy on the Zendure website for $69 with worldwide shipping.

Note: Zendure provided the Passport II Pro for the purposes of this review. No other compensation was received.

Article Link: Review: Zendure's Passport II Pro 61W Travel Adapter Can Power Just About Everything, Including a MacBook Pro
 

whyamihere

macrumors 6502a
Jun 30, 2008
586
1,165
'nati
Done! Who knows when I'll be able to int'l travel again, but can still use it at home in the meantime. FYI that $45 goes to $55 if shipping to the US.
 
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magicvash

macrumors member
Apr 22, 2014
51
91
Like the concept but I was hoping that the rise of GaN meant we could get chargers with higher wattages so that one could charge their laptop at 60W, their iPad at 20W or whatever, and still have some room left to charge their phone and watch at reasonable speeds.
 
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justperry

macrumors G5
Aug 10, 2007
12,021
9,081
I'm a rolling stone.
Like the concept but I was hoping that the rise of GaN meant we could get chargers with higher wattages so that one could charge their laptop at 60W, their iPad at 20W or whatever, and still have some room left to charge their phone and watch at reasonable speeds.

There are already 100 Watt and even 120 Watt chargers.

Just an example of multiple high Amp charging....

Screenshot 2020-07-24 at 18.35.01.png
 
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Infinite Vortex

macrumors 6502a
Mar 6, 2015
503
959
My usual problem with these types of adapters, ones that plug directly to a power socket, is that it forces you to be within a certain distance from the one power socket with everything you happen to want to charge. As I'm sure we've all experienced at one time or other, places like hotel rooms, don't always offer the most convenient positioning of available power socket (assuming the is one at all!) to places you'd put a laptop or places you'd put your phone to charge while you sleep.

So it's all presumptive of all things converging into the one point and that point being a convenient place. Failing that, is presumptive that all of my desired cables are like 2m+ long in order to achieve that flexibility… and that's quite a pain. Convenience is often about what you require and when, and the need to converge all of your devices to the one point isn't always the most convenient.

Not saying that's I've got a better solution other than carrying around multiple charges (which I do) but there's always a perspective that doesn't fit the mould.

PS Not to mention that if this was either lost or broken what exactly happens to your ability to charge… well… anything?!
 
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bluespark

macrumors 68020
Jul 11, 2009
2,457
2,840
Chicago
Seems like a great device for international travelers. I may get one. Would love to see one with even more power so I could charge my MBP and other devices simultaneously.
 
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Infinite Vortex

macrumors 6502a
Mar 6, 2015
503
959
Seems like a great device for international travelers. I may get one. Would love to see one with even more power so I could charge my MBP and other devices simultaneously.

The great thing about USB-C charging with the MBPs is that they'll charge with basically anything USB-C PD. Even a 15W phone charger will do the job. The only difference is the time it takes. On short trip (assuming I'm on a short trip… or any trip at all for that matter) I'll simply take a 45W Samsung Note 10 charger to charge my MBP (or phone or tablet). It charges it "fast enough" especially given I shouldn't be spending that level of time on my MBP anyway.
 
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Northbynorthwest

macrumors newbie
Aug 29, 2016
15
8
Looks practical, but really don't like it that they use the Europlug design for Europe rather than Schuko (and yes, it's almost impossible for this to feature a Schuko design without looking like a monster).

I've always found Europlug to be a bit flimsy and they fall out of contact with the socket if you plug anything too heavy into it. Schuko is studier because its larger.
 
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zorinlynx

macrumors 604
May 31, 2007
6,815
11,952
Florida, USA
Every time I see UK and EU plugs I feel bad for them using such a massively bulky plug. It's impossible to make anything that plugs in tiny without doing crazy tricks because the plug has to physically be so big!

I do bet they have a lot less trouble with overloaded plugs cooking in an outlet, though. Those pins are freaking BEEFY.
 
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justperry

macrumors G5
Aug 10, 2007
12,021
9,081
I'm a rolling stone.
Looks practical, but really don't like it that they use the Europlug design for Europe rather than Schuko (and yes, it's almost impossible for this to feature a Schuko design without looking like a monster).

I've always found Europlug to be a bit flimsy and they fall out of contact with the socket if you plug anything too heavy into it. Schuko is studier because its larger.

Shuko is not better because it is bigger, it's more stable because the plug goes into the wall outlet, it has support from the (Fitting) wall outlet.
It adds bulk to the charger, you won't find any, it's also not needed because chargers don't need ground.



Every time I see UK and EU plugs I feel bad for them using such a massively bulky plug. It's impossible to make anything that plugs in tiny without doing crazy tricks because the plug has to physically be so big!

I do bet they have a lot less trouble with overloaded plugs cooking in an outlet, though. Those pins are freaking BEEFY.

That's the UK plug, yes, way too bulky, the EU plug is much better than the flimsy US plug, safer as well, only the tips are made of metal, there's no way to touch the prongs while inserting it while it's "live".
 
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dasmb

macrumors 6502
Jul 12, 2007
293
226
There are already 100 Watt and even 120 Watt chargers.

Just an example of multiple high Amp charging....

That 120W charger PLUS an adapter would take up as much room in my luggage as the Passport II and is a much more versatile pairing. I'll buy one for sure once it's a real product.

60W is enough to trickle charge overnight, but it's not enough to charge an MBP that is in actual use, meaning GPU active and one or more cores pegged. I can say this with certainty because we have 60W chargers randomly throughout our office and when I'm plugged in to one it's common I will lose power within 2 hours.
 
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arfung

macrumors member
Jun 27, 2015
40
14
I can’t find a link to order this thing — only the early bird signup. Is it available for sale?
 
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justperry

macrumors G5
Aug 10, 2007
12,021
9,081
I'm a rolling stone.
That 120W charger PLUS an adapter would take up as much room in my luggage as the Passport II and is a much more versatile pairing. I'll buy one for sure once it's a real product.

60W is enough to trickle charge overnight, but it's not enough to charge an MBP that is in actual use, meaning GPU active and one or more cores pegged. I can say this with certainty because we have 60W chargers randomly throughout our office and when I'm plugged in to one it's common I will lose power within 2 hours.

(IMHO) The above charger does not solve anything, when in a different (Plug) region you probably use other devices so a separate adapter is still needed.
This one is an all in one, like the iMac, many people don't want a screen and a computer in one, same goes for this charger.
 
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Neepman

macrumors 6502a
Jul 31, 2008
636
878
You gotta feel sorry for all these travel-based gadget companies because international travel is dead until 2022 and business international travel is dead forever. I'm regularly dealing with companies that are cutting their T&E budgets for 2021 by 80%. The maturation of video conferencing tech and its forced adaptation due to Covid has ended business travel permanently.
 
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poematik13

macrumors 6502a
Jun 5, 2014
943
770
My plugbug duo does the job for international travel. It charges my laptop, watch, and phone all at once, and it's not restricted to a certain wattage since you can plug in any MBP charger brick into it.

I don't see how this product is better than plugbug.
 
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Grey Area

macrumors 6502
Jan 14, 2008
360
856
Looks practical, but really don't like it that they use the Europlug design for Europe rather than Schuko (and yes, it's almost impossible for this to feature a Schuko design without looking like a monster).

I've always found Europlug to be a bit flimsy and they fall out of contact with the socket if you plug anything too heavy into it. Schuko is studier because its larger.

On an adapter like this I very much prefer the flat Europlug, to maximize compatibility. In Europe the Europlug-sockets are typically recessed and thus provide some mechanical support for the plug. As a consequence the Europlug still works in Schuko-sockets, whereas Schukoplugs don't fit into Europlug-sockets.
 
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justperry

macrumors G5
Aug 10, 2007
12,021
9,081
I'm a rolling stone.
Snip... whereas Schukoplugs don't fit into Europlug-sockets.

Huh, where do you get that from?
The standard shuko has metal ground pieces on the side, and then there are the oddballs with a third ground prong, if it's the latter you are right, but those are not really standard except for just 2 places IIRC.
 
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Grey Area

macrumors 6502
Jan 14, 2008
360
856
Huh, where do you get that from?
The standard shuko has metal ground pieces on the side, and then there are the oddballs with a third ground prong, if it's the latter you are right, but those are not really standard except for just 2 places IIRC.

I should have been more specific. I mean recessed sockets specifically made for the flat Europlugs, for example like this triple socket:
PL_tripleEuroplug_socket.jpg

The prongs of a Schuko-plug would fit, but the plastic walls prevent the plug from going in deep enough.
This type of socket is uncommon on walls nowadays, but a lot of extension cords have them.
 
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justperry

macrumors G5
Aug 10, 2007
12,021
9,081
I'm a rolling stone.
I should have been more specific. I mean recessed sockets specifically made for the flat Europlugs, for example like this triple socket:
PL_tripleEuroplug_socket.jpg

The prongs of a Schuko-plug would fit, but the plastic walls prevent the plug from going in deep enough.
This type of socket is uncommon on walls nowadays, but a lot of extension cords have them.

No worries
I never saw these (In wall) ones, I travelled a lot, not one single time I bumped into these ones, I did see extensions cords with these though.
 
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wackymacky

macrumors 68000
Sep 20, 2007
1,540
51
38°39′20″N 27°13′10″W
Not sure it’s the ideal time to release a travel adaptor in middle of the pandemic with international tourism numbers looking to be 60-80% down.

I already have a bunch of adaptors, but may check it out once I can fly internationally again if means one less thing to pack.
 
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CarlJ

macrumors 603
Feb 23, 2004
5,528
9,700
San Diego, CA, USA
Every time I see UK and EU plugs I feel bad for them using such a massively bulky plug. It's impossible to make anything that plugs in tiny without doing crazy tricks because the plug has to physically be so big!

I do bet they have a lot less trouble with overloaded plugs cooking in an outlet, though. Those pins are freaking BEEFY.
The UK plugs are also carrying twice the voltage. And I’ve heard numerous folks from the UK remarking that our US plugs look terribly small and unsafe (not that they are unsafe, just they perceive them that way). All a matter of what you’re used to.
 
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steve62388

macrumors 68030
Apr 23, 2013
2,945
1,709
Every time I see UK and EU plugs I feel bad for them using such a massively bulky plug. It's impossible to make anything that plugs in tiny without doing crazy tricks because the plug has to physically be so big!

I do bet they have a lot less trouble with overloaded plugs cooking in an outlet, though. Those pins are freaking BEEFY.

UK plugs have a number of safety features that contribute to their size.

 
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thefourthpope

Contributor
Sep 8, 2007
1,162
441
DelMarVa
As usual, a thorough and helpful review. My next trip out of the States won’t be for at least a year, but this is definitely on my list for upgrading my travel kit.
 
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